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14:56

Hacks/Hackers and Mozilla want to know: How should we structure an online curriculum for journalists and technologists to learn together?

Hacks/Hackers, Mozilla, the Medill School of Journalism, The Media Consortium, and others are teaming to develop a solid six-week online curriculum that will benefit both "hacks" and hackers.

To make this work, we need feedback from both journalists and programmers on the questions:

  • What topics should be covered?
  • Would you be interested in helping to teach a topic?

Read on for more context, or just jump to the topic suggestions posted below as answers and add your vote, or -- better yet -- ideas.

Quick background

As some of you in the this community may have read, Hacks/Hackers and Mozilla are teaming up to run a six-week peer-to-peer course for "hacks" and hackers. The overall theme of the course will be "Open Journalism on the Open Web," and -- being a peer-to-peer course that is all about "open" -- we need your input and involvement to make the course a success.

As part of Mozilla's ongoing work to keep the web open, we've been supporting a number of exciting education projects through the Mozilla Drumbeat initiative & Peer-to-Peer University (P2PU). Two great examples are the School of Webcraft course -- the ultimate environment in which to learn the craft of open and standards-based web development. -- and the recent Digital Journalism course with Joi Ito of the Keio Graduate School of Media Design.

Course format

Each week the course will focus on a different topic, and each week the participants will be joined by a different subject-matter expert from the field of news innovation. The weekly course readings, online participation, and a seminar are expected to require roughly 4-6 hours.

The topics that we've outlined to date are posted below as answers to this question. Please give them a vote up / vote down to let us know what you think, or -- better yet -- add your own answers.

We also want to know:

  • Courses you want: If you were running the show (and you are!), what topics would you want to see covered?
  • Courses you want to teach: Did I mention that this is a peer-to-peer course? Seriously, what topics are you a subject-matter expert on? Would you be willing to be part of our teaching team?

We need your help to make this happen. Please take a moment to vote on the answers posted below, or comment with your ideas. (Please also indicate your interest in attending, volunteering, or teaching.)

We're hoping to run a pilot course in September, so it would be great to have your quick comments as soon as possible.

Many thanks in advance for your input.

Phillip.
(On behalf of Mozilla)

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl