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June 26 2013

23:13

Razorfish CEO on What’s Next in Branded Content and Storytelling

CANNES – Marketers should be on the lookout for new ways to blend storytelling into branded content, says Bob Lord, Global CEO of Razorfish in an interview with Beet.TV. As an example, he points to a recent effort by Razorfish client Citibank in which the marketer helped to curate the AOL Business channel.
“We bought part of the business channel for Citibank…and that brings us to a different level,” Lord explains in this video interview. “We bought the content ahead of time so we can help shape the content and help Citibank live up to its brand promise.”
To develop successful campaigns today, marketers need to consider media, technology and creativity simultaneously. That’s the premise of his recent book, Converge. “You have to think about these areas concurrently,” he says.
In addition, mediums like video are likely to include more interactivity and two-way communication going forward, he says. ”Video is one of the most effective mediums to engage with your audience and get feedback on your brand.”

June 18 2013

23:01

AOL Makers Tops 40 Million Views in First Year

CANNES – Since its launch 13 months ago, AOL has grown its “Makers” series to 40 million video views, with the number of views rising month over month, says Maureen Sullivan, Senior VP and General Manager Lifestyle Brands and Women’s Content at AOL during an interview with Beet.TV.

Makers is a joint video project between AOL and PBS and tells the stories of pioneering women from Gloria Steinem to Hillary Clinton in a series of professionally produced, short, documentary style videos. The series has been exclusively sponsored by Unilever’s Simple Skin Care brand since its inception. Sullivan said many viewers will often start by watching one video and then stay and watch six or seven more. For more insight into the growth of Makers and how video viewers are engaging with the content, check out this video interview.

AOL is the sponsor of Beet.TV’s coverage of Cannes Lions.

22:51

AOL’s Cahn on AOL On’s Resurgence of Original Content

CANNES – AOL has been supporting their variety of premium original content this week at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. Beet.TV spoke with Karen Cahn, GM of AOL On Original Video for AOL, about their recent developments during the event.

As the first content company on the Internet, Cahn says AOL has gone through a resurgence in creating premium original content.

During the event, AOL celebrated the global launch of Be On, AOL’s global video branded content platform. This summer, AOL will be releasing a full-length documentary film about the story of Napster, Downloaded, which will be available on AOL On and TechCrunch. In addition, AOL’s original content ventures include HuffPost Live, which features 12 hours of streaming content everyday; MAKERS.com, a digital platform for sharing women’s stories; and 15 new shows that were announced during this year’s NewFronts.

“When you watch the  content, you don’t know if you’re watching TV or watching the web, and so that’s really where the industry is going. It’s just beautifully produced content made for consumers that they love and that they share and that they get to talk about,” Cahn says.

June 17 2013

21:20

AOL Adds Biometric Tracking to Video Ad Measurement

CANNES – Using biometric tracking, AOL has begun testing emotional reactions to ads via a partnership with technology firm Realeyes, says Mihkel Jäätma, Managing Director of Realeyes during an interview with Beet.TV at Cannes. The company’s facial recognition software can measure the level of attraction, retention, engagement, impact and other emotions elicited in video ads, he explains.

The goal of the AOL-Realeyes pair-up is to quantify the emotional response to branded video content. Realeyes leans on consumer measurement panels from established firms such as CINT and Toluna. Consumers opt-in to have their facial reactions tracked via Webcams. “We collect info frame by frame for each emotion…and we have a condensed reporting form to show you how a piece of content scores in comparison to other things out there,” Jäätma says. For more insight into the applications of this technology in marketing, check out this video interview.

 

AOL is the sponsor of Beet.TV’s coverage of Cannes Lions.

21:20

AOL Tests Emotional Response to Video Ads

CANNES – AOL is working with brands such as LG and Heineken on its new neuromarketing platform that aims to measure emotional reaction to video ads, says Rene Rechtman, SVP of AOL International. This sort of measurement can help brands better understand whether their creative is actually connecting with consumers in a meaningful way, Rechtman says in this video interview with Beet.TV at Cannes. AOL introduced the new platform in early June and it’s powered by tools from the tech firm Realeyes. The technology relies on consumers’ webcams to measure the emotional response to ads based on their facial reactions. For now, consumers opt in via measurement panels for the tracking. “We all say we engage more with great content but we don’t have the data and technology to provide that, so now we can provide that data to ourselves and to marketers and advertisers to show that a piece of creative is generating lots of emotional connection,” he explains.

For more insight into how brands are using the technology, check out this video interview.

AOL is the sponsor of Beet.TV’s coverage of Cannes Lions.

June 11 2013

14:02

Brands Move Money to Online Video from TV and Display, Cite Better Engagement

Nearly three-quarters of ad dollars flowing into online video is coming from TV money, according to a new study from AOL’s global branded content platform Be On. In addition, the brand, media and creative agencies surveyed said that while TV is a strong awareness driver, they can achieve more scale and engagement with online video. We recently caught up with Rene Rechtman, SVP AOL Networks International about the the company’s work in online video. The study revealed that TV and display are the main budgets where agencies in Europe, the United Kingdom and North America are drawing resources from and diverting to online video. In addition, about 84 percent of agencies said they believe the Internet is fundamentally becoming a “rich brand medium with engaging interactive opportunities.”

More than 80 percent say they are turning to branded video because of its reach and audience and content targeting capabilities. About 67 percent cite measurement as a key reason for upping online video spend going forward. AOL is aiming to compete in the targeted audience market via its Be On branded content platform that helps marketers reach audiences at scale, Rechtman says. For more insight into Be On, check out this video interview. Be On includes insights, social data and traditional data, he adds.

 

 

 

 

May 09 2013

19:48

AOL Studios’ Lewis: New Slate of AOL On Series Is Focused, Uniform

AOL announced 15 new shows for AOL On channels at the AOL NewFront 2013. Gabriel Lewis, head of AOL Studios, says they “wanted to focus on short-form, docu-style series that really were focused on a particular perspective or talent or point of view, that when you finished watching it, the world was a more interesting place.

“We tried to create a uniform slate, and I think that came across today.”

At the end of this video interview, Lewis, also a co-creator of HuffPost Live, speaks about the progress of the 8-month-old network. So far, HuffPost Live has seen over 8,000 guests from over 80 countries and has received more than 1 million comments.

Beet.TV spoke with Lewis at the AOL NewFront 2013 event.

March 28 2013

14:00

At The Wall Street Journal, a smartphone app has reporters on board for shooting video

The text-based web is dead, says Michael Downing. When AOL CEO Tim Armstrong announced his intention this month to transform the company into a platform for video, Downing heard a death knell — one he’s been expecting for some time. We are, after all, as he says, on the precipice of “the rise of the visual web.”

Downing has a dog in this fight; he’s the founder of Tout, a video sharing website and app that makes it easy for users to upload and share short — under 15 seconds — videos in real-time. Although originally designed as a consumer device, it also appealed to publishers: The Wall Street Journal approached Downing with the idea for a proprietary app that reporters could use as a news gathering tool. With the addition of some analytics tools and a centralized management function that allows editors to quickly vet clips before they’re published, that became WorldStream, which we wrote about in August.

“Consumer behavior has become much more accustomed to consuming the news they want as it happens,” says Downing. “The WSJ was trying to be much more in line with real-time news and real-time publishing.”

More than half a year later, how’s WorldStream working out? The Journal seems pretty happy. On the business side, WorldStream point man and WSJ deputy editor of video Mark Scheffler describes the project as a “destination but also a clearinghouse.” While all of the WSJ’s mobile videos are first published to the feed, many go on to live second lives across a wide variety of platforms. Some clips follow reporters to live broadcast appearances, while others are embedded into article pages and blogs. Andy Regal, the Journal’s head of video production, said that they don’t break out WorldStream views from the newspaper’s overall video numbers, which he said total between 30 and 35 million streams per month.

That kind of traffic across platforms draws the attention of advertisers. The WSJ says video ads generate “premium” rates, meaning somewhere around $40 to $60 CPM. Says Tim Ware, WSJ director of mobile sales, of the Journal’s broader video strategy: “We’re very bullish on the growth of WSJ Live this fiscal year, and thus the growth in video ad revenue. We’re also starting to contemplate some one-off sponsorships within our overarching video coverage of select events and stories.” (After spending about a total of about an hour on WorldStream, however, I only saw one ad — for a “smart document solutions” company — repeated about a half dozen times.)

But the surprise, both for Downing and WSJ management, is how readily — and ably — the WSJ’s reporters have taken to the new medium; getting reporter buy-in has been a struggle for many newspaper video initiatives. “It started out as an internal tool because we didn’t know how many people would be able to accommodate this kind of approach with the technology and the software,” Regal says, “but they think about it as part of their daily work now.” Armed with iPhones, iPods, iPads, and Android devices, hundreds of WSJ staffers have filed video clips via Tout; in the 229 days since launch, that’s 2,815 videos. In many cases, Downing said, the reporters didn’t even need training: “They just jumped right in and started using it.”

Charles Levinson has been reporting for the Journal from places like Syria “What are the assets that give us an advantage over the competitor? We have 2,000 reporters around the world,” he said. “How do you parlay 2,000 reporters into good video?” Levinson says the Tout app is helping the WSJ avoid print media’s tendency toward “mediocre” video production.

Christina Binkley is a style columnist at the WSJ who first experimented with the app while reporting on New York’s 2012 Fashion Week. She says there’s a lot of pressure on reporters to be producing a huge variety of content — articles, columns, blogs, Instagrams, tweets. She said, unlike some other apps, WorldStream has really stuck with her: “I can add a lot of value to my column very quickly without having to mic somebody up.”

Scheffler says some of the reporters have gained basic video shooting skills so quickly that the footage they file can be edited together into longer clips that could pass for more traditionally produced video. Going forward, Scheffler hopes to put better mobile editing tools in their hands: “Being able to be full-fledged creators on a mobile platform is something that we’re just going to continue being at the frontier of,” he said.

Regal’s focus, meanwhile, will be to make sure none of that prime footage is being lost in the ever quickening deluge that is the WorldStream feed. He’s considering a “Best of WorldStream” weekly digest, and a variety of other news packages that make that valuable content more findable, and more shareable.

News organizations have been chasing the promise of video advertising for years now, and the rise of apps like Vine illustrate the rise of social video sharing. But Downing says he isn’t worried about the competition. “Ninety-nine-point-nine percent of the existing video sharing apps have to do with self-expression,” he says, comparing Vine to something like Instagram. Tout’s enterprise apps skip the idea of sharing with friends and focuses on fast, concise updates from outlets that users follow based on broader personal interest.

“It’s a real-time, reverse chronological vertical feed of updates,” says Downing, “Whether it’s Twitter or LinkedIn, that is becoming the standard form factor for being able to track that information that you curate yourself.”

Since partnering with The Wall Street Journal last year, a number of publishers have pursued similar agreements with Tout — CBS, Fox, NBC Universal, WWE, La Gardere and Conde Nast are among them. By the end of 2013, Downing expects to host around 200 media outlets, including some of News Corp.’s other brands. Downing says these publisher agreements are now the company’s “primary mode of business,” not the consumer product.

What does Downing see coming in video? He confidently points to Google’s spring 2012 earnings report, when for the first time, its cost-per-click rate fell. “That was the sounding bell. That was the beacon. That was the one clear signal to the world that the era of the print metaphor defining the web experience…was over.”

July 25 2012

13:22

AOL says Patch continues to double its revenue from last year

Poynter :: In its second-quarter earnings report, AOL says Patchgrew traffic and engagement at double digit rates year-over-year and quarter-over-quarter” and that revenue more than doubled in the second quarter compared to a year earlier.

A summary by Steve Myers, www.poynter.org

Tags: AOL Patch

May 04 2012

05:54

Huffington's role 'shrinks' at AOL

Huffington Post :: Arianna Huffington acknowledged Thursday that her portfolio at AOL Inc. is being scaled back to include only the Huffington Post, undoing a structure put in place when her website was acquired by AOL last year.

HT: Mathew Ingram, here:

Arianna's role is reduced at AOL, but she says she doesn't want to leave and "all is good" with Armstrong: online.wsj.com/article/SB1000…

— Mathew Ingram (@mathewi) May 4, 2012

Continue to read [exclusive subscriber content] Keach Hagey, online.wsj.com

Tags: AOL Huffington

April 25 2012

20:23

What your Klout score really means: Be prepared for your next job interview

Hm. There are people with higher Klout Score than me :-) (look here)

Wired :: Last spring Sam Fiorella was recruited for a VP position at a large Toronto marketing agency. With 15 years of experience consulting for major brands like AOL, Ford, and Kraft, Fiorella felt confident in his qualifications. But midway through the interview, he was caught off guard when his interviewer asked him for his Klout score. Fiorella hesitated awkwardly before confessing that he had no idea what a Klout score was. The interviewer pulled up the web page for Klout.com—a service that purports to measure users’ online influence on a scale from 1 to 100—and angled the monitor so that Fiorella could see the humbling result for himself: His score was 34. “He cut the interview short pretty soon after that,” Fiorella says.

Continue to read Seth Stevenson, www.wired.com

Tags: AOL

April 23 2012

17:43

Microsoft sells 650 AOL patents to Facebook for $550m

Microsoft Press Release :: Microsoft Corp. and Facebook announced today a definitive agreement under which Microsoft will assign to Facebook the right to purchase a portion of the patent portfolio it recently agreed to acquire from AOL Inc. Facebook has agreed to purchase this portion for $550 million in cash. In the initial AOL auction, Microsoft secured the ability to own or assign approximately 925 U.S. patents and patent applications plus a license to AOL’s remaining patent portfolio, which contains approximately 300 additional patents that were not for sale.As a result of today’s agreement, Facebook will obtain ownership of approximately 650 AOL patents and patent applications, plus a license to the AOL patents and applications that Microsoft will purchase and own.

HT: Emily Parkhurst, TechFlash

Continue to read www.microsoft.com

08:19

AOL, Yahoo & Co.: Portals battle activist investors

Adweek :: An embattled CEO like Yahoo’s Scott Thompson or AOL’s Tim Armstrong isn’t likely to welcome a proxy fight. But maybe they should. B. Riley analyst Sameet Sinha said proxy fights­—when investors try to use their clout to get public companies to take specific actions—are “inevitable” for Web 1.0 firms like AOL and Yahoo that have valuable assets but slow-moving management.

Continue to read Tim Peterson, www.adweek.com

Tags: AOL Yahoo

April 16 2012

09:37

Nielsen, AOL chase ads with TV-like ratings

AdWeek :: Is Nielsen’s online measurement service ready for prime time? AOL thinks so—and is guaranteeing against Nielsen’s new Online Campaign Ratings.

Continue to read Sam Thielman, www.adweek.com

Tags: AOL

April 13 2012

15:40

This Week in Review: The fallout from Facebook and Instagram’s deal, and e-books’ unclear future

Facebook scoops up Instagram: There were two billion-dollar deals in the tech world this week, and by far the bigger of the two was Facebook’s purchase of the photo-sharing app Instagram. Mathew Ingram of GigaOM has a good, quick roundup of initial reaction to the deal, but I’ll try to sort through each of the angles to the story, including what this means for Facebook, Instagram, and the tech world in general.

The first big question was why Facebook bought Instagram, especially for so much money. The most common answer, voiced most persuasively by GigaOM’s Om Malik, was that Facebook felt threatened by Instagram’s ascendance in mobile photo sharing, one area in which Facebook has struggled. Business Insider’s Nicholas Carlson explained why Instagram does mobile photos so much better than Facebook, and Fortune’s Dan Primack suggested that Facebook panicked at all the money Instagram has raised recently.

The New York Times also characterized the deal as a big move by Facebook into mobile media, but there were other key aspects at work, too: Ingram said Instagram’s value lay in its network, and Wired’s Tim Carmody said what matters to Facebook is Instagram’s personal data. Rackspace’s Robert Scoble outlined some of the specifics of that data, and All Things Digital’s Lauren Goode focused on Instagram’s location data. New York’s Paul Ford said Facebook is attempting to buy Instagram’s sincerity: “Remember what the iPod was to Apple? That’s how Instagram might look to Facebook: an artfully designed product that does one thing perfectly.”

So what does this mean for Instagram? TechCrunch detailed the company’s rise, and the big concern was, as CNN’s John Sutter put it, whether Facebook would “ruin” Instagram. Mashable’s Christina Warren urged Facebook to keep Instagram mobile-only and keep it separate from Facebook logins, and Jolie O’Dell of VentureBeat pointed out some of the good things Facebook’s developers could do for Instagram. TechCrunch noted that Facebook’s statement that it would keep Instagram as a separate product is a big departure from Facebook’s unified approach.

That concern over Facebook ruining Instagram indicates a certain revulsion for Facebook among Instagram users, something Om Malik took note of. Forbes’ John McQuaid said the sentiments reveal our uneasiness with the utility-like role tech giants like Facebook are playing in our new social world, and The Next Web’s Courtney Boyd Myers reminded Instagram users that the fact that they loved it so much was a big part of the reason it got bought in the first place.

The next question was for the tech industry as a whole: Does Instagram’s massive purchase price signal another tech market bubble? The Atlantic’s Rebecca Greenfield said it’s just time to accept the existence of a social media bubble, and the Guardian’s Charles Arthur said we may not be at the peak of inflated valuations, though also at the Guardian, Dan Gillmor said we could be near the end of the bubble. But Wired’s Andy Baio crunched the numbers and said Instagram wasn’t overvalued, and if anything, the tech market is rewarding efficiency. Forbes’ Robert Hof, meanwhile, looked at whether we’ll see more social media purchases soon, coming up with some reasons for a slowdown.

Finally, Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman looked at some of the ways journalists have used Instagram, and Reuters’ Jack Shafer put the deal in the context of the larger cultural shift from voice to text to images. “So, Instagram is here,” he said. “What I want to know is: Where is it going to take us?”

Apple, publishers, Amazon, and ebooks’ future: The ebook industry absorbed a blow this week when the U.S. Department of Justice sued Apple and five of the largest book publishers for antitrust violations involving price-fixing for ebooks. (Sixteen states also filed a lawsuit of their own.) Three of the publishers — Hachette, Simon & Schuster, and HarperCollins — immediately settled with the DOJ, and Wired’s Tim Carmody explained the terms of the settlement, which will undermine the model that the publishers created with Apple, though not kill it outright. Apple, Penguin, and Macmillan have decided not to settle, and the latter’s CEO issued a defiant letter in response to the suit.

PaidContent’s Laura Hazard Owen wrote a fantastic explanation of what the case is about, but in short, the issue centers on what’s called agency pricing, in which the publishers set book prices, rather than the retailers, and the books must be at the same price across retailers. In 2010, Apple negotiated an agency pricing model with the big book publishers for the rollout of its iPad’s iBookstore, and the DOJ objected to that as price-fixing.

The Verge’s Nilay Patel dug through more of the details from the lawsuit of the alleged price-fixing process, particularly its response to Amazon’s perceived ebook dominance. At the same time, however, as Peter Kafka of All Things Digital noted, Apple was allegedly considering a deal to divide and share rulership over online content with Amazon. A few people said the DOJ wasn’t likely to win the suit: Law prof Richard Epstein said the agency pricing arrangement has more social and consumer benefits than a classic collusion case, and CNET concluded that Apple should be able to win its case, too. Adam Thierer of the Technology Liberation Front put the strategy in the context of copyright challenges, coming out against the suit in the process.

Also this week, we found out that several of the big publishers have refused to sign their annual contracts with Amazon, as Salon’s Alexander Zaitchik reported and Laura Hazard Owen explained. The Seattle Times has been running a critical series on Amazon, which, as the Los Angeles Times pointed out, includes some real concern about Amazon behaving anti-competitively by selling ebooks for too little.

Publishers have argued that that’s why agency pricing is necessary: It’s the best chance to keep Amazon from undercutting publishers and laying waste to the book industry. Web thinker Tim O’Reilly said the government should be watching Amazon more closely than the five companies it just sued, but Nate Hoffelder of The Digital Reader defended Amazon, arguing that it’s helping enable an entirely new publishing model in its stead.

Christopher Mims of Technology Review said it doesn’t matter if Amazon becomes a monopoly. And GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram also said Amazon’s practices have been good for consumers and good for innovation, unlike those of the publishers: “They seem to have spent most of their time dragging their feet and throwing up roadblocks to any kind of innovation … Their defense of the agency-pricing model feels like yet another attempt to stave off the forces of disruption. Why not try to adapt instead?”

Microsoft’s big patent purchase: The other billion-dollar deal drew less attention, but could be an important one beneath the tech industry’s surface: Microsoft paid just more than $1 billion for more than 800 AOL patents, outbidding Amazon, eBay, Google, and Facebook for the intellectual property trove. The patents involve advertising, search, mobile media, and e-commerce, and includes the patents underpinning Netscape, as All Things D reported.

CNET’s Jay Greene and Stephen Shankland described a few of the more interesting patents potentially involved in the deal and pointed out that Microsoft’s work may have been closer to AOL’s than any other potential buyer. Dealbook’s Michael de la Merced characterized the deal as part of a “gold rush” on patents in the tech world. On AOL’s end, The New Yorker’s Nicholas Thompson worried that the money from the deal will go to appease shareholders rather than create new products, and ZDNet’s Andrew Nusca was also skeptical of the sale’s value for AOL, wondering why the company couldn’t take advantage of the patents itself. “To me, AOL’s decision to sell this part of the portfolio shows a lack of confidence in its ability to execute in these areas,” he wrote.

Remembering Mike Wallace: One of the most legendary figures in the news industry died last weekend — Mike Wallace, longtime journalist for CBS and 60 Minutes in particular. The New York Times has a definitive obituary, and CBS has some more personal remembrances. The Times also collected responses to Wallace’s death, in which he was remembered as a tough-minded reporter: The New Yorker’s Ken Auletta described him as a pioneer of investigative journalism on television. Likewise, New York’s Matt Zoller Seitz gave a thoughtful appreciation of Wallace’s “informed showmanship”: “He was our stand-in, asking the questions that we might have asked if we were there and had his skill and nerve.”

Others had more personal stories: The legendary investigative reporter Seymour Hersh, longtime Philly television columnist Gail Shister, j-prof Dan Kennedy, and The Wrap’s Sharon Waxman. As Kennedy wrote: “I really do think there was a golden age of television news, and Wallace was right in the middle of it.”

Reading roundup: Plenty of other interesting pieces to keep up with this week:

— A few more takes on last week’s purchase of the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News by a group of local investors: The New York Times’ David Carr mused on the return of the newspaper baron, the American Journalism Review’s John Morton examined the recent spree of newspaper purchases in a downtime for the industry, and Penn prof Victor Pickard argued for more systemic solutions to save papers like Philly’s.

— A couple of interesting pieces from the academic view of journalism: NYU’s Jay Rosen and MIT’s Ethan Zuckerman talked about trends in journalism at an MIT forum (summarized well by Matt Stempeck), and CUNY’s C.W. Anderson talked a bit about his research on data journalism to Tyler Dukes of Reporters’ Lab.

— The debate over the value of online commenting continues: Animal’s Joel Johnson proposed that comments are worth far less than publishers think, because they don’t draw many readers and don’t make money, but GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram countered that comments are an important check on online authority and that not allowing them tells readers to “go away.”

— News analyst Alan Mutter made the age-old argument that newspapers are failing in their digital efforts in a brief, potent piece decrying newspapers’ poor digital products and weak competitive response, and urging them to pool their efforts.

— Finally, Digital First Media’s Steve Buttry wrote a gracious but no-nonsense letter to newsroom curmudgeons defending digital journalism practices, then wrote about what he learned from its fallout, then addressed the role of news organizations themselves in enabling curmudgeonhood. The posts and comments are a good glimpse into the current state of newsroom culture and change.

Facebook/Instagram logo by Karl Nilsson, iPad photo by Luiz Filipe Carneiro Machado, and old CBS Radio ad by Nesster all used under a Creative Commons license.

March 31 2012

08:34

Jonathan Tasisi and 9,000 unpaid bloggers: Lawsuit vs Huffington Post tossed

Thomson Reuters :: AOL on Friday won the dismissal of a lawsuit by unpaid bloggers who complained they were deprived of their fair share of the roughly $315 million that the company paid last March to buy The Huffington Post website. U.S. District Judge John Koeltl rejected claims by social activist and commentator Jonathan Tasini and an estimated 9,000 other bloggers that they deserved $105 million, or about one-third, of the purchase price.

Continue to read Jonathan Stempel, newsandinsight.thomsonreuters.com

March 29 2012

05:48

Portfolio war: Inside AOL's $1b patent portfolio

AllThingsD :: Tim Armstrong has been pumping up AOL’s patents in public. Privately, he has reportedly hired bankers to shop the Web company’s portfolio. But what does he have to sell? At an investor conference this month, Armstrong said that AOL has 700 to 800 “really important” patents, and that about half of them are “incredibly important” for Internet users.

Chart and indepth analysis - Continue to read Peter Kafka, allthingsd.com

Tags: AOL

March 19 2012

12:57

Concerned? Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, AOL and Facebook now account for 68pc of all online ad revenue

GeekWire :: Americans are spending more time consuming news, using devices such as smartphones and tablets to track events on the go. But even as news consumption rises, the traditional media companies that have produced the news aren’t necessarily benefitting. The 2012 State of the News Media report from the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism found that five technology companies — Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, AOL and Facebook — now account for 68 percent of all online ad revenue.

[John Cook:] ... newspapers are taking it on the chin. Print circulation continues to fall, and the advertisers continue to flee, causing a downward spiral in newspaper revenue.

Continue to read John Cook, www.geekwire.com

February 27 2012

22:37

AOL's CTO Alex Gounares leaves company

AllThingsD :: According to sources close to the situation, AOL’s CTO Alex Gounares is leaving the New York-based Internet company. At AOL, he was in charge of all of AOL’s vast technical operations. He is among a number of execs who have been hired by CEO Tim Armstrong and then have departed.

Continue to read Kara Swisher, allthingsd.com

Tags: AOL

February 10 2012

06:55

Where does Arianna fit into AOL’s new patch plans?

paidContent :: AOL has hired a new Chief Content Officer in its latest attempt to reboot Patch, the network of hundreds of sites that offer “hyper local” coverage. The appointment of Parenting.com’s Rachel Fishman Feddersen comes at a high time when AOL CEO Tim Armstrong is promising impatient shareholders that Patch is “not a pet project” and that he will turn around the sites that reportedly lost $100 million last year.

While a turnaround strategy is clearly in order, there’s a big wild card here. Namely, what role will Arianna Huffington now play in the Patch properties?

Continue to read Jeff Roberts, paidcontent.org

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