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July 01 2013

21:41

Adobe Acquires Marketing Company Neolane; Expands Digital Marketing Services

CANNES — As it expands its marketing services footprint, Adobe has been focusing on its Adobe Marketing Cloud platform for digital marketers, says Ben Rabner, Web and Content Strategist at Adobe during an interview with Beet.TV. Offering real-time feedback, the Adobe Marketing Cloud is designed to help marketers measure, monetize and understand their ROI for digital campaigns that encompass advertising, targeting, social and Web experiences, he explains.

“If you have a piece of creative, what is the return on that? You can test it and segment it for different audiences to get a certain lift,” he explains. He adds that Adobe works with several major brands that use the service to identify the best channels in which to invest their ad spend. “Our algorithms identify what the lifts will be, what targets they need to go higher, how far into the video someone is getting.”

For more insight into how brands are using Adobe Marketing Cloud, check out this video interview.

Adobe recently announced plans to acquire conversational marketing company Neolane in a deal valued at $600 million, according to TechCrunch. The acquisition should help boost the Marketing Cloud service.

 

June 18 2013

17:20

Adobe Finds Tablets Racing Ahead For Retailers

Time was, the term “mobile” could be used to describe a swathe of devices. But now the market is so rich with portable gadgets, it’s time to get more granular, according to Adobe digital marketing SVP and GM  Brad Rencher.

“A lot of people are still lumping smartphones together with tablets, together with other types of mobile device,” Rencher told Beet.TV during the Cannes Lions advertising conflab. “We’ve seen very different behaviour in terms of how and when people use those devices.”

“Tablets are becoming a powerhouse in terms of engagement with apps and shopping. People are spending more time with tablets between the hours of 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Smartphones tend to be out and about during the middle of the day, looking for directions or  for a restaurant.

“Tablets are becoming a retailer’s dream. We buy more often when we shop  on tablets than we do on desktops or smartphones. And when we buy, we buy 25 percent more product on tablets than we do on any other platform.”

Rencher bases the differentiation on “hundreds and hundreds of millions of interactions” from Adobe’s Marketing Cloud advertiser analytics suite.

May 23 2013

11:29

Netflix to Deploy Local “Cache Boxes” for Streaming HD Video to the “Last Mile”

Netflix, which dominates Internet traffic in the U.S. with as much as 30 percent of bandwidth at peak hours, is shifting from its distribution from content delivery networks (CDN’s) which stream from a central point, to a multitude of “cache” boxes which will be widely distributed to Internet provides who will store high quality video locally, says industry analyst Dan Rayburn, director of the Streaming Media conference.

Netflix VP for Content Delivery Ken Florance outlined the plan for the first time publicly at the conference earlier this week.  Rayburn reports about the plans which includes the local cache of HD and super HD 4K content.

The Netflix program is called Open Connect.  Here is a recent report on the new product.

In this video, Rayburn reports on other news and trends from the show including the emergence of H.265 and MPEG-DASH.

 

April 16 2013

00:54

Adobe Launches Collaborative Editing Solution at NAB

LAS VEGAS  —  At NAB last week,  Adobe presented its collaborative editing solution called Adobe Anywhere.  At the show, we  interviewed Adobe Anywhere Senior Product Manager Michael Coleman about the product.

Coleman explained, “Anywhere is going to allow professionals that are working with Premiere Pro and Prelude to collaborate on media over the network.”  Groups of people can work on centrally-located shared productions from anywhere in the world. “It’s a really big shift in the way people work.”

Adobe Anywhere doesn’t use proxy files, says Coleman.  “We work directly with high resolution media, and we have a new technology called the Adobe Mercury streaming engine that will send the high res media all the way across the network to the editor who’s working right in Premiere Pro and Prelude.  It’s a great way to work and it’s a huge advance in productivity.”

Coleman explains more about the product and target user, as well as gives a short demo of Adobe Anywhere, in the video interview.

Megan O’Neill

August 30 2012

15:44

August 17 2012

01:07

HTML5, Apps and JavaScript Wrap-Up

The first TimesOpen event of 2012 was a big success and a lot of fun.

July 28 2011

12:54

What the h... is ROIII? - Insights into USA Today's social media strategy

Omniture and Adobe produced a (promotional) webcast about how to create social media fans on Facebook & Twitter. The webcast part I was interested in, was the one covering insights into USA Today's social media strategy, introducing ROIII, or Return on interaction, influence, and investment. Before USA Today even started to turn to social media they set up an interdisciplinary team from various departments, including marketing, IT and editorial staff. Marketing took the lead and trained Editorial colunnists, reporters, bloggers, etc. But listen yourself or download the transcript of the webcast directly from their site. The webcast can be downloaded to watch on an iPod, or as Quicktime movie or mp4.

[Jeff Wiegand, USA Today, webcast, 31:00:] We really want to be part of the conversation now ... (instead of only publishing updates, which is old school journalism

Continue to watch the presentation www.omniture.com

Download a transcript of the webcast via www.omniture.com/download (PDF)

July 23 2011

06:52

Khoi Vinh, ex New York Times: iPad readers don't want replicas, a print-centric approach is wrong

Betabeat :: For this week’s cover story about Condé Nast’s struggle developing for the iPad, Betabeat had the opportunity to talk to Khoi Vinh, former Design Director for NYTimes.com. On his widely-read design blog, Subtraction, Mr. Vinh has repeatedly expressed his skepticism toward publishers like Condé Nast and Hearst and software companies like Adobe for thinking that what iPad readers want is a magazine replica app that takes a print-centric approach to tablet design. 

What's the best approach to iPad design?

Continue to read www.betabeat.com

July 21 2011

18:52

Advertiser count - Condé Nast and Adobe try to get a handle on digital mag metrics

paidContent :: While it may be exciting for advertisers to try out out an interactive ad in a digital magazine, at the end of the day, they just care about the numbers. With that in mind, Condé Nast and its digital magazine partner Adobe offered a unspecified group of “key advertisers” a look at some new metrics designed by the software company’s analytics unit, Omniture, that promises to show levels of distribution, audience exposure and engagement. The announcement comes as magazine publishers have been struggling with how far to go in terms of developing digital issues of their magazines.

More metrics mentioned and explained in David Kaplan's article are: total digital circ, total issue readers, total ad readers, total number of exposures per ad, average number of times reader views a specific issue, average time spent with tablet issue.

Continue to read David Kaplan, paidcontent.org

September 08 2010

10:54

Andorid audio editing apps: no joy for Journos?

Android robot logo.
Image via Wikipedia

I’m currently putting together stuff for my Digital Newsroom module for this year.

One of the things I ask the students to do is to record and edit a short audio vox-pop*.We have a number of audio recorders of varying levels of ‘quality’ at the Uni and access to Audacity and Adobe Audition. But I don’t stipulate what the audio should be recorded on or how it’s edited. My line is always ‘if you can do it and submit it by banging nails in to a piece of wood, go for it”.

I want the students to explore the range of resources that are out there and I’m always keen to add to the list of possible tools and resources they can use. So Uber blogger and font of endless multimedia journalism info Mark Luckie couldn’t have timed his latest post better.

The post highlights 3 Unique ways to record, edit, and publish your audio. It includes Monle, a four track editor for iphone/touch which is useful if you use you phone to record your audio interviews. Which got me thinking about the students who might want to use their mobile to record audio but don’t have an iphone or touch.

Android audio apps?

I see a lot of iphones at work but I also see a serious number of Android based phones so I thought I would do a quick scoot around and pick one or two apps that none Apple users could consider. And the result…

Nothing….

Nada….

Move along now, nothing to see.

Well, OK, there was one; ringdroid which, on the surface, looks pretty good. But that was it.

Iphone/touch is the platform of choice

From my reading round its seem the stumbling block is  a dodgy audio api on android – delays etc. But I was genuinely surprised that there wasn’t at least an attempt to try. Maybe it’s too niche!

I’m nervous of the eulogizing that goes on of the iphone/touch as the ‘tool of choice for multimedia journalists’ but I have to say that as an all in one device (the new touch in particular) it’s looking pretty good.

If you know about a good audio recording/editing app on Android or other mobile platforms for that matter, please let me know.

* Before the anti-vox brigade have a go I should say that this is part of a series of competency ‘tests’. I want to be sure that the students have exprimented with recording audio and vox is an easy ‘reason’ to record audio.

Update: Transom.org has a nice article looking at the Monle and Hindenburg audio apps.

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August 23 2010

09:40

Why every independent news site should have a YouTube channel

John Hillman is editor of PC Site and head of publishing and projects at Net Media Planet.

With video in the ascendancy many independent online publishers and bloggers are beginning to feel that offering video content is a necessity rather than a nice optional extra. Yet creating editing and hosting a video can be an expensive and time consuming business that isn’t always easy to get right.

However, building a YouTube channel to sit alongside your indie website, whether it’s a blog, online magazine or hyperlocal, is much easier than many people would think. You can build the channel out to look exactly like your existing site, and with some good content and clever use of title tags you could find yourself attracting lots of new readers that may never have found you otherwise.

The figures speak for themselves. People searching for videos on YouTube make up a staggering 25 per cent of all of Google’s search volumes; it stands to reason therefore that anyone serious about increasing their readership should be tapping this rich source of traffic. When you also consider that Google now automatically displays a selection of YouTube videos in its search results, the opportunity for drawing new readers to your site should be obvious

As an independent online publisher we’ve found that YouTube has a lot to offer, providing us with a platform on which to publish unique video content, increasing our readership levels and helping us build our reputation as a quality online technology site.

Video equipment

Fortunately online video is valued more for its content than its production value, so while big news organisations may spend thousands on AV equipment, any indie publisher can get going with tools as basic as a Flip video camera and an open source video editing programme. This amounts to a total cost of around £150.

At PC-Site we use Flip video cameras all the time. They are cheap, small and fully optimized for the internet. This lets you get on with making basic videos without having to worry about such unfathomable tech conundrums as codecs fighting each other on the timeline.

When it comes to editing software there are lots of open source options out there, but Camtasia Studio works exceptionally well as both a movie editor and for creating screencasts. It costs about £220, which is excellent value for money. It also lets you automatically upload directly to your YouTube channel once you’ve finished the production process, saving you time. Alternatively we use TubeMogul to upload our videos as it enables us to do it across multiple sites, such as YouTube, HowCast and Vimeo simultaneously.

Branding your YouTube channel

This is a very important part of the process. It takes surprisingly little to give both your videos and your YouTube channel a quick makeover so that they reflect your blog or website.

Using Adobe Fireworks, for example, you can quickly mock up a little logo, if you have one, which will sit nicely in the corner of your screen during playback. Those of you with Adobe Illustrator skills can even create an ident to give your videos that real ‘TV Channel’ look. All of these things require a bit of extra effort but they really make a big difference to the finished product.

Your YouTube channel itself can also be branded by uploading a suitable background image that fits with your blog or website, and by going through the YouTube registration process you will be able to choose how the URL ends, also giving you that extra brand uniformity.

Once you’ve customised your videos and YouTube channel you can use the ‘sharing’ button to automatically syndicate your videos through your various online social networks, and you can embed your videos on your blog or website. You can also link your YouTube channel directly with your blog using the ‘blog setup’ button, this way your videos will post straight to your website from YouTube.

Getting it all up and running does take a small investment from you in terms of time, problem solving and creative thought, but the benefits that come from it are well worth the effort. One of our videos got nearly 30,000 views in a couple of months, all from just a cheap video camera a free video editing platform and the benefits of YouTube’s vast army of viewers. Not bad for an afternoon’s work.

More from John Hillman on Journalism.co.uk

Follow him on Twitter: @johnjhillmanSimilar Posts:



August 10 2010

18:00

To click or not to click: Could tiered data plans water down advertising possibilities for news publishers?

In the good old days (of three months ago) you could surf the web on your iPhone with abandon. Do I want to watch this video? Sure! Do I want to download this huge attachment? Why not? Data plans were unlimited; there was no need to think twice, at least not about cost. And that offered news organizations hope, especially when the iPad came along. Maybe slick smart phones and tablet devices would usher in a new advertising revenue stream more akin to print advertising rates than the standard, abysmal web rates.

But now AT&T has nixed the all-you-can-eat data plans for users of the new iPhone 4 and the iPad. (Some lucky folks have been grandfathered in.) And rumor has it that Verizon will soon follow suit with their smartphone plans. It sounds like the Internet’s trajectory from dial-up pay-by-the-minute plans to unlimited — only in reverse. I can picture my mother now: It’s 1995 and she’s waiving the AOL bill frantically, exasperated. What are you spending all this time online doing? Back then, the Internet was like the worst big box store you can imagine: get in, get what you need, and get out. Quickly. When the billing structure for Internet usage went unlimited, Internet use exploded in our house — and everywhere. It’s a version of Chris Anderson’s “mental transaction costs” — even “very cheap” forces a thought process that “free” does not.

So what happens when we move back to a world where data is scarce? Will we act like I did in the days of my 300-minute cell phone plan? (Wherearewemeeting? OKbye!) With consumers facing an extra $15 per extra 200 MB used (depending on your plan), will news sites — particularly those heavy on video — suffer from user indecision? This New York Times video on New Orleans bounce weighs in at 32.9 MB; our latest video is 216 MB. Mobile versions are smaller when available, but even then, a few videos can send users of the cheapest iPhone plan down the toll road. (AT&T estimates that someone on that plan could watch only 20 minutes of streaming video a month before hitting the cap.)

I spoke with Jeff Whatcott, senior vice president of marketing for the online video platform Brightcove, which provides the video back end for lots of news sites. He said that while the shift may cause some changes in user behavior at the margins, he doesn’t predict a shift away from mobile video. If anything, he says, Brightcove has seen the opposite: The iPad has triggered immense interest among advertisers, who want to get rich media like video ready for mobile.

Whatcott suspects that AT&T wouldn’t set prices in such a way that they’d “kill the golden goose.” If users started seeing their monthly bill skyrocket, they might abandon their devices. But going over, say, ten bucks a month? Abandonment seems less likely. “The people that are buying [mobile devices] have disposable income and unless the cost of these new data plans are just exorbitant, where people are getting bills for hundreds or thousands of dollars, I think the costs are going to be in that reasonable range.” No one likes paying the cable bill, he points out, but most of us do anyway.

But what about just the threat of a higher bill? Could fear water down use? Whatcott says he can imagine that sentiment, it being somewhat like using a costly international data plan, which he does traveling. “I think it’s a real world concern,” he says, “but it hasn’t been an acute thing that has bubbled up to us as a crisis.”

I also reached out to Adobe, which helped Wired build its successful iPad app, which weighs in at a whopping 500 MB. Dave Dickson, product marketing manager for digital publishing at Adobe, said he didn’t think the move away from unlimited data would have a big impact on apps like Wired’s. AT&T already limits the downloading of large (over 20 MB) apps to wifi or desktop connections only, and downloading an entire magazine issue at once eliminates the slow dribble of data that its web equivalent would involve.

Indeed, a shift to wifi is a common prediction for how consumers would react to capped data plans. AT&T has in the past pushed iPhone owners to shift to wifi whenever possible.

Still, smartphones are designed to be mobile devices, and it’s not realistic to expect users to have wifi available anywhere they’d like to consume content. “Should smartphones emerge as the device class of choice,” Dickson emailed, “publishers may need to tailor their content package to the capabilities of the device (for example, streaming video instead of embedding it) so that users can more easily download and view content applications under bandwidth-restricted conditions.”

Mobile Marketer Daily explored this topic when the new data plans were announced, and analysts for the mobile ad industry agreed that the new structure is unlikely to reverse a trend toward an explosion in mobile devices. “I don’t think this move by AT&T will slow the adoption of smartphones and connected devices like the iPad, as enough consumers have experienced first-hand the benefits of how these devices enrich their daily life,” Paul Kultgen, director of mobile media and advertising at Nielsen Online, Chicago told Mobile Marketer Daily.

In any event, we’ll find out in the coming months whether there’s any real impact for mobile video. If you’re on a newly tiered plan and watching your KBs the way you once watched your minutes, has it affected how you surf the web?

July 31 2010

23:15

Does anyone know the best program to convert acrobat reader files like documents into a word document?

Does anyone know the best program to convert acrobat reader files like documents into a word document so someone could edit or fill the document. I have found several but none have worked very well or were way too complex to bother.

08:49

Does anyone know the best program if there is one to convert acrobat reader files like documents into a word document so someone could edit or fill the document. I have found several but none have worked very well or were way too complex to bother.

Does anyone know the best program if there is one to convert acrobat reader files like documents into a word document so someone could edit or fill the document. I have found several but none have worked very well or were way too complex to bother.

May 03 2010

15:10

Programming Language for Kids Banned from Apple App Store

The MIT News Office recently interviewed one of our colleagues at the MIT Center for Future Civic Media, Mitch Resnick.

Resnick is a long-time Media Lab professor best known for helping develop and deploy Scratch, a programming language for kids. But this month Apple rejected an app that would allow kids to view Scratch programs on iPhones and iPads.

Resnick is his ever-reasonable self in the interview, saying that Apple doesn't allow applications that interpret or execute code and thus the Scratch app in question (which was developed by a third party) violates that policy. But it's an indication of the challenges of working with products by companies like Apple, where one of the world's great programming languages can't run on one of the world's most popular platforms.

"As we see it," Resnick wrote on the Scratch blog, "there is nothing more important than empowering the next generation of kids to design, create, and express themselves with new media technologies."

Patricia Seybold at Customer Think described this issue as a case of "kids caught in the crossfire" in a battle between Apple and Adobe, which is responsible for Flash -- one of the options for Scratch -- and which Apple thus far refuses to allow on iPhones and iPads. It's a somewhat strange decision because, as Warren Buckleitner at the New York Times blog Gadgetwise points out, Apple allows Flash and other executable programs to run just fine on its other products.

The more likely reason for Apple's decision to ban the Scratch app, Buckleitner argued, is that it could allow an iPhone or iPad to download other digital content, such as music, directly from the source rather than through the iTunes Store.

In other words: "Sorry kids, could you be quiet? Adults are talking here."

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November 23 2009

22:34

Adobe's Flash Player 10 on Nearly All the World's Computers -- Getting Ready for 10.1

SAN JOSE, CA - Adobe's latest version of Flash has been installed in some 98 percent of the world's computers, according to Kevin Towes who is product manager for Flash Media Server. 

We caught up with Kevin at an opening night party for the Streaming Media West hosted by Brightcove.

Kevin explains the functionality of Flash Player 10 and the new Flash Player 10.1 which launched in Beta earlier this month. 

In this wide ranging interview, he discusses peer-to-peer elements functionality iof the new player, digital rights management and the Flash Media Server.

He references the 98 percent penetration for Adobe 10 at 2:40 in the video. 

Andy Plesser, Executive Producer

Disclaimer:  We covered the Brightcove party in San Jose as part our sponsorship association with Brightcove.   

November 20 2009

03:42

Adobe Aims to Dominate Software Format for eReaders

Adobe sees a big growth opportunity in the emerging eReader market, says Bill Rusitzky, who heads media alliances for the software company.

The company is heavily promoting its ePub product which will be used in the Nook and the Sony eReader. It is not used in the Kindle and will not likely be used in the anticipated Apple Tablet.

MediaMemo's Peter Kafka reports on the looming software battles over formats for the new devices.

I interviewed Bill last month in New York at the Beet.TV Online Video Roundtable.

Andy Plesser, Executive Producer

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