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June 27 2013

14:39

MediaStorm Guide to Copy and Pasting a Clip Range in Premiere Pro

This article is part of a new series of posts with tips and tricks from our producers’ experience working with Adobe Premiere Pro after years of working in Final Cut Pro. To read more about why we made the switch, check out this post.

Today’s post was written by MediaStorm producer Eric Maierson.


A neat new feature in Adobe Premiere Pro CC is the ability to copy and paste a range of clips (or one clip) without first having to use the Razor Tool (C).

To do this simply mark an In (I) and Out (O) on your timeline.

Then, Copy (Command-C) and Paste (Command-V).

Super easy, super helpful.

Note that if a clip is already selected, you’ll simply copy and paste whatever is highlighted, not the range indicated by in and out marks. Use Command-Shift-A to first deselect all clips.


To learn more about how our producers are using Adobe Premiere Pro see our other blog posts on the topic. Also, follow our producers’ twitter feed @PrProShortcuts for Premiere shortcuts.

To learn more about our production style, you can purchase a copy of our Post-production Workflow. Readers who purchase our current Final Cut Pro and Aperture workflow automatically receive the Premiere workflow when it is released.

MediaStorm offers several online and in-person training opportunities at mediastorm.com/train.

Have you made a recent switch in your editing software? Let us know about it in the comments below.

May 15 2013

14:58

MediaStorm Guide to Creating Subtitles in Premiere Pro

This article is part of a new series of posts with tips and tricks from our producers’ experience working with Adobe Premiere Pro after years of working in Final Cut Pro. To read more about why we made the switch, check out this post.

Today’s post was written by MediaStorm producer Eric Maierson.


There’s a critical difference between the title tool in Final Cut Pro and Adobe Premiere Pro. In FCP, one could slice a title that’s already in the timeline, open it in the Viewer window, then change the contents so that you now had two distinct titles.

This does not work in Premiere Pro.

In Premiere Pro each title is a distinct instance. So, if you splice a title in the timeline then change its content, you will also change the content of the first title as well. Both titles will say the same thing.

The only way around this is to create a new title instance for every subtitle. It’s a cumbersome process and one that we wish Adobe would change.

Setting Up a Title Template

In the Project window create a new bin (Command – /). Name it Subtitles.

Open the title tool (Command-T).

In the New Title window, name the title temp. The title size will default to your current sequence size.

When the title tool opens, press T for the Type Tool, then click inside the rectangle. Use 38pt Arial, then type a short phrase. If you plan to use drop shadow, and you should, add it here as well. (Tim McLaughlin will follow up this post with a more detailed look at the functionality of the Title Tool.)

Next, click the Selection tool (arrow icon) and move the title so that it rests on top of the title-safe line.

Use the Horizontal Center tool to align the title in the middle of the screen.

Close the title tool.

Drag the title from Project window to your Timeline.

To create a new title, simply click the New Title Based on Current Style button at the top right of the Title tool.

XML

At MediaStorm we no longer use burned-in timecode. We use XML to generate titles in our player.

If you plan to use XML with your subtitles for any reason, say to copy from one computer to another, the following steps are crucial:

Each time you paste a phrase from your transcript into a subtitle, you must also rename the subtitle instance with the exact same phrase.

If the contents of the subtitle is “I went home” the name of the subtitle instance must also be “I went home”; the names must match identically. That’s because XML in Premiere Pro reads the name of the title, not its contents.

Here too, we wish Adobe would change this behavior so that XML functioned as it does in Final Cut Pro 7, reading the content of the subtitle, not the name of the title file – the opposite of how it works now.

It’s obviously more expedient to avoid this extra step.

Subtitle Styles

Font Size – 38

Font – Arial

Drop Shadow – Standard effect, change opacity to 90%

Fades

If narrative is more than 15 frames from the end or beginning of a cut, set subtitle to start 10 frames before the start or end of narrative, then place 8 frame fade on subtitle.


To learn more about how our producers are using Adobe Premiere Pro see our other blog posts on the topic. Also, follow our producers’ twitter feed @PrProShortcuts for Premiere shortcuts.

To learn more about our production style, you can purchase a copy of our Post-production Workflow. Readers who purchase our current Final Cut Pro and Aperture workflow automatically receive the Premiere workflow when it is released.

MediaStorm offers several online and in-person training opportunities at mediastorm.com/train.

Have you made a recent switch in your editing software? Let us know about it in the comments below.

April 08 2013

13:38

MediaStorm Guide to Installing Missing Final Cut Pro Codecs for Premiere Pro

This article is part of a new series of posts with tips and tricks from our producers’ experience working with Adobe Premiere Pro after years of working in Final Cut Pro. To read more about why we made the switch, check out this post.

This great tip comes from Jonathan Grubbs via Josh Meltzer.


Should you install Premiere Pro on a machine without Final Cut Pro, you will find your machine missing some key codecs such as ProRes. The solution is straightforward.

Quit Premiere Pro.

Download the ProApps Quicktime Codecs from the Apple site.

You’ll receive an error if you try to install the codec package without FCP on your system.

Install ProApps QuickTime codecs

The workaround is to first install the free application unpkg.

Drag the ProAppsQTCodecs.pkg file on to the unpkg icon.

unpkg

Unpkg wil extract the components to your desktop.

Finder

In the Finder select Go > Go to Folder… (Command-Shift-G). Enter /Library/QuickTime.

Drag the component files in to this folder. You’ll need to click Authenticate and enter your root password.

Open Premiere Pro and the new codecs will be available.


To learn more about how our producers are using Adobe Premiere Pro see our other blog posts on the topic. Also, follow our producers’ twitter feed @PrProShortcuts for Premiere shortcuts.

To learn more about our production style, you can purchase a copy of our Post-production Workflow. Readers who purchase our current Final Cut Pro and Aperture workflow automatically receive the Premiere workflow when it is released.

MediaStorm offers several online and in-person training opportunities at mediastorm.com/train.

Have you made a recent switch in your editing software? Let us know about it in the comments below.

April 04 2013

13:39

MediaStorm Introduces Asset Parser for Final Cut Pro 7 and Premiere Pro 6

Today we are releasing our Asset Parser for public use. This free online tool created by the MediaStorm production and development staff generates a list of all image, video and audio files used in a project.

When it’s time to color correct photography, rather than scanning the timeline for image names, we use the Asset Parser to create a quick list. These file names can then be copy-and-pasted into Apple’s Aperture or a similar application to locate the necessary photographs.

Here’s an example of an asset list generated by the parser.

In addition to speeding up your color correction workflow, this list can be used as a guide for other tasks, such as manually archiving your work.

The Asset Parser works with both Final Cut Pro 7 and Premiere Pro 6.

Try using the Asset Parser with your project at tools.mediastorm.com/asset_parser.

April 01 2013

13:20

MediaStorm Guide to the Adobe Premiere Pro Media Cache Database

This article is part of a new series of posts with tips and tricks from our producers’ experience working with Adobe Premiere Pro after years of working in Final Cut Pro. To read more about why we made the switch, check out this post.

Today’s post was written by MediaStorm producer Eric Maierson.


Each time you import audio or MPEG video files into Adobe Premiere Pro, the application caches a version into a database. This speeds up performance so that new previews do not need to be generated each time you view a clip.

Audio is stored in a .cfa file and MPEG in .mpgindex. These files are shared between Adobe Media Encoder, After Effects, Premiere Pro, Encore and Soundbooth.

By default both the cache files and the database are stored in the location /Users//Library/Application Support/Adobe/Common.

To check this, open Premiere Pro > Preferences > Media.

Storing Cache Files

Under normal circumstances, we tell producers to keep all project files together. But in this case it’s problematic as the media cache is not project-based. It stores files from all of your projects in one location.

So if project A, along with your cache drive, goes offline, project B on a separate drive will need to rebuild these files.

Of course, you could change the cache location each time you begin work on a different project. But honestly, the chances of forgetting this step seem high.

At MediaStorm we’ve left the cache in its default location without any noticeable performance issues. Nevertheless, the sheer number of these files means that they will add up quickly.

Cleaning the Cache

In the cache preferences (Premiere Pro > Preferences > Media) you’ll see a Clean button. Unfortunately, this function works counter to what might be expected. The Clean button deletes cache files associated with files that are currently not online. It ignores cache files related to your currently open project.

With that in mind, it’s difficult to create a specific workflow for deleting unused files. Our best suggestion is to make sure all current projects are mounted before cleaning the cache. This can obviously become burdensome if you’re working on more than one project.

Making The Cache Better

Ideally, I’d prefer to see the clean cache function work like the Render Manager in Final Cut Pro 7 (Tools > Render Manager…).

In FCP, the Render Manager opens a new window displaying a list of projects that contain render files. It offers the ability to individually select which project files to delete.

Hopefully, Adobe will address this issue.

For more information on Premiere Pro’s media cache database see Adobe’s support document Setting Up Your System.


To learn more about how our producers are using Adobe Premiere Pro see our other blog posts on the topic. Also, follow our producers’ twitter feed @PrProShortcuts for Premiere shortcuts.

To learn more about our production style, you can purchase a copy of our Post-production Workflow. Readers who purchase our current Final Cut Pro and Aperture workflow automatically receive the Premiere workflow when it is released.

MediaStorm offers several online and in-person training opportunities at mediastorm.com/train.

Have you made a recent switch in your editing software? Let us know about it in the comments below.

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