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July 01 2013

21:51

CNBC Launches “TV Everywhere” with Major U.S. Carriers

ENGLEWOOD CLIFF, NJ – CNBC has launched  its live, linear programming for the desktop.   It can be watched by subscribers to several of the largest cable and satellite operators in the United States including Cablevision, Comcast, DISH and Verizon.  This “first phase” of the service launched last month.

Viewing via the desktop, notably in the workplace, will greatly expand the footprint of the business television network. It will provide a new source of advertising as entirely different ad inventory can be served into the live stream, explains Kevin Krim, SVP and GM of CNBC Digital, in this interview with Beet.TV

Krim, the former global digital head of Bloomberg, also speaks about the emerging of opportunity for news producers and advertisers in the emerging, real-time, socially charged media landscape.

May 06 2012

07:03

Warren Buffett to CNBC: Mark Zuckerberg right to keep tight control

CNBC :: Warren Buffett has no plans to buy into the upcoming Facebook IPO, but tells CNBC's Becky Quick he has spoken for a few hours with founder Mark Zuckerberg and thinks he's doing the right thing by maintaining tight control of the company, even after it goes public.

HT: Henry Blodget, Business Insider

Buffett just told me he spoke to Mark Zuckerberg for hours about taking Facebook public. Offered advice. #BuffettWatch #BRK2012

— Becky Quick (@beckyquickcnbc) May 5, 2012

Continue to read Alex Crippen, BuffetWatch.cnbc.com

Tags: CNBC Facebook

January 06 2012

21:46

CEO William Lynch: ‘The Nook will continue to be Barnes & Noble’s e-reader’

paidContent :: In a CNBC interview today, Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch told David Faber, “Whatever we do, we will continue to have a tight relationship between the Nook and [our] stores.” The interview follows yesterday’s news that Barnes & Noble may split off the Nook business from the rest of the company.

Transcript of the CNBC interview - Continue to read Laura Hazard Owen, paidcontent.org

September 14 2011

07:51

Newspaper video: Time to reconsider your video strategy?

A few issues have popped up in my reading round the web that make me think that if online video has fallen off your agenda then it may be worth thinking again. A few things make me think that.

Engagement with HTML5 by publishers means that the idea of cross platform (web, tablet etc) video becomes a reality. The recent announcement by FT that they were moving away from the apple fold to deliver their apps from a web base shows a certain maturity in that area. It may not be universal but those publishers who engaged with apps with half an eye to html5 and associated tech are starting to see the benefit. They also have an exit route from Apple’s walled garden.

The announcement that the WSJ is upping it’s online video would, on the surface, seem to be a simple illustration of the point. But theres a bit more to it:

The Journal has expanded its video content in spite of its contract with CNBC, the leading business news network on television, and in spite of the fact that The Journal’s parent has its own business network, Fox Business.  The CNBC contract expires in about 15 months, but already Journal reporters tend to appear more often on Fox than on CNBC.

The shifting approaches of print in particular to the challenge of keeping your voice in a spreading market, often rests on the idea of impartiality. An alignment to Fox is as blunt a move to prove the point as you can get. But if you want to establish a ‘voice’ then video can be a key part of that changing ‘brand’.

Newsless broadcast

But there is also a shift on the other side of that relationship. There is a very clear by broadcasters towards product and not a service focus. That will leave a gap that print will have to backfill. Yes there is a big investment in online delivery services but the commercial driver is very much a product proposition. Most of the large broadcasters are seeing a real benefit in exclusive and value-added programming online. The ‘watch again’ of the iplayer-like channels, the webisodes and web exclusive episodes are all examples of how broadcast has ‘finally’ found its feet online.

I think that news is low on the agenda in a broadcasters strategy. For broadcasters, news is very much a service. It’s often something they have to do as a requirement to a license or a sop to public service. It’s easier to advertise around the x-factor than it is news at ten and that’s where the money will go. Non-broadcast providers will pay the price for that.

If you buy in your video from a third party, expect the prices to go up and the quality, range and relevance to go down. 

LocalTV

Here in the UK, we also have the looming Spector of localTV. There is obviously a new market to explore there. I’m skeptical about the range, depth and return that market will have for journalism but, hey, it never hurts to consider it.

So video gives you a good opportunity to extend your identity and cut free those ties with an increasingly newsless broadcast sector. Just invest a little in understanding the technology underlying the new platforms.In the long run it might be a better investment than simply paying to be on those platforms.

 

July 02 2010

05:45

SAM ZELL, THE TERMINATOR

sam-zell-billionaire-real-estate-mogul122

Sam, Zell, Tribune Group’s owner, that include big guns like Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune, leads a newspaper company with great vision…

He recently voiced his opinion about the future of newspapers on CNBC.

Reflecting on the future, said “going forward, it’s going to require all kinds of different approaches, including probably most significant, the elimination of home delivery and the replacement of it by PDFs.”

Oh, boy, what a shame to have owners like him!

If I were working for this company I will start to look for another job.

June 30 2010

12:50

CNBC, New York Times and Vanity Fair recognised at US business journalism awards

Winners of the US-based business journalism awards, the Gerald Loeb Awards, were announced yesterday, with CNBC, the New York Times and Vanity Fair each claiming two awards.

New York Times assistant investigative editor Walt Bogdanich was given the Lifetime Achievement Award, while chief mergers and acquisitions reporter, Andrew Ross Sorkin was awarded a Loeb for his book, ‘Too Big to Fail’.

The awards were established in 1957 by Gerald Loeb, to honour journalists who contribute to the understanding of business, finance and the economy.

See a full list of the winners and their entries here…Similar Posts:



March 22 2010

16:56

#followjourn: Lucy Fitzgeorge-Parker/business travel and sailing writer

#followjourn: Lucy Fitzgeorge-Parker

Who? Business, travel and sailing writer.

What? Former deputy editor at Business Traveller and sub-editor at The Independent, who is now a freelance journalist and editor. Fitzgeorge-Parker has had various articles published in The Daily Telegraph and on CNBC Business online.

Where? Click here to see more about Lucy Fitzgeorge-Parker.

Contact? Follow @lucyfparker.

Just as we like to supply you with fresh and innovative tips every day, we’re recommending journalists to follow online too. They might be from any sector of the industry: please send suggestions (you can nominate yourself) to judith or laura at journalism.co.uk; or to @journalismnews.

Similar Posts:



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