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April 04 2013

13:39

MediaStorm Introduces Asset Parser for Final Cut Pro 7 and Premiere Pro 6

Today we are releasing our Asset Parser for public use. This free online tool created by the MediaStorm production and development staff generates a list of all image, video and audio files used in a project.

When it’s time to color correct photography, rather than scanning the timeline for image names, we use the Asset Parser to create a quick list. These file names can then be copy-and-pasted into Apple’s Aperture or a similar application to locate the necessary photographs.

Here’s an example of an asset list generated by the parser.

In addition to speeding up your color correction workflow, this list can be used as a guide for other tasks, such as manually archiving your work.

The Asset Parser works with both Final Cut Pro 7 and Premiere Pro 6.

Try using the Asset Parser with your project at tools.mediastorm.com/asset_parser.

July 30 2012

15:21

MediaStorm Post-production Workflow Released for Final Cut Pro X

post-production-workflowWe have released a new version of the MediaStorm Post-production Workflow for Final Cut Pro X.

The workflow takes advantage of many of the new FCP X features and reduces the number of steps from the previous FCP 7 version.

While MediaStorm producers tested and refined the original MediaStorm Post-production Workflow for FCP 7 over seven years and more than 100 projects, we created the workflow for FCP X based on limited work with the new software. At the moment, it is a work in progress.

The updated workflow is bundled with the original FCP 7 workflow and includes access to MediaStorm’s Apple Aperture Workflow and MediaStorm’s Final Cut Asset Parser. Everyone who previously purchased the workflow will receive complimentary access to the FCP X document.

About the MediaStorm Post-Production Workflow

Developed over seven years, the MediaStorm workflow covers every phase of editing, from organizing assets through outputting final projects and archiving. Covering more than 200 steps, our approach efficiently streamlines the editing process with a focus on organization and creativity.

The MediaStorm Post-production Workflow includes:

  • The full 200-step workflow MediaStorm uses everyday with Final Cut Pro 7
  • The new workflow for Final Cut Pro X
  • Exclusive access to MediaStorm’s Apple Aperture Workflow, including information on how to best use the image management program in conjunction with Final Cut Pro
  • Exclusive access to MediaStorm’s Final Cut Asset Parser, a tool we developed to quickly generate a list of asset names used in a Final Cut 7 project
  • Time-saving software suggestions for transcribing audio, syncing and converting and editing video
  • Integration of more than 10 MediaStorm tutorials to help you choose the right music, color correct your video, work efficiently with subtitles, and backup and archive your files effectively
  • Helpful tips on organizing, naming and selecting assets

The MediaStorm Post-production Workflow takes into account best practices from more than 100 multimedia projects by MediaStorm producers.

Online access to MediaStorm’s Post-production Workflow, including MediaStorm’s Apple Aperture Workflow and Final Cut Asset Parser, can be purchased for a one-time fee of $14.95.

Click here for details.

Have you used our Post-Production workflow with FCP 7 or FCP X? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

July 15 2011

15:21

Final Cut Pro X, it was good while it lasted.

This is the last in our series of MediaStorm producers responding to the new FCP X. If you missed them, you can check out Eric Maierson’s thoughts here, and Tim McLaughlin’s here.

FCP X, it was good while it lasted.

After working in FCP X for a week, I left on a Friday buoyed by the speed and efficiency at which the program runs. I had blazed through a weeks worth of work in just three days.

But on Monday morning, my work was gone.

I spent an hour on the phone with Apple. They asked me to run some tests. Several times I opened the project, made some changes, and closed it. Each time I reopened the file, it behaved differently.

Think Memento.

Sometimes the program “remembered” the changes correctly. Other times it reverted to a previously saved version. Other times it combined two previously saved versions to create a third!

The consultant on the phone sent my file to the engineers. He said they would analyze it and send me the prognosis in 48 hours. It’s over a week later, and I still haven’t heard back.

I’ve returned to FCP 7, but I can share my insights from a week of working with FCP X.

The Good

  • It’s speedy. I definitely noticed the difference in response time when I returned to FCP 7
  • Using keywords is a fast and easy way to organize your footage

The Bad

  • Synching more than two cameras using synching doesn’t work (I tried to synch three cameras with no luck. I also combined two cameras into a compound clip, and attempted to synch the third camera to this clip. Still, no luck)
  • FCP X crashes when editing multiple formats
  • Skimming is annoying when you don’t need it, and I didn’t find it very helpful when scanning for sound bites. You can, of course, just turn it off, but it would be great if you could actually use it to scan for bites.

And the Ugly

  • Being able to save your work is 101.

I believe it’s too early to predict the future, but after my experience I do not recommend using the program right now.


In summary: as much as we all really wanted to love FCP X, it’s not usable for us in its current iteration. We’ve all reverted back to FCP 7 for now. We’re hoping that updates will make the program work for us in the not-too-distant future, but we’re also starting to look at other possible solutions should we need to make a switch. Right now, it’s really too early to make a decision.

We’d love to hear thoughts and impressions from all of you – are you making the switch, or sticking with FCP 7, or switching to an entirely new system? Let us know in the comments.

July 04 2011

00:34

How far should loyalty go?

To say I am a rabid Apple freak would be an understatement. My first computer (1981) was an Apple IIe…followed by a Performa, then an iMac (tear-drop), another iMac (monopod), and Macbook. And while I’m a Mac freak, I generally run my computers until the times force me to move on to a faster, sleeker, more current machine.

My love of Macs has only been rivaled by my love of Apple’s software. The OS has generally be easy to work with (one painful period during the forced switch from Classic to OS X). The video editing software – my personal weakness – is what kept me a firm supporter of the company. iMovie, Final Cut Express, Final Cut Pro. The latter always a bit out of my reach as a high school teacher (with teeth – also a three decade survivor of TV news).

You know where this is going.

My dream of a post-retirement gig has always included a good solid camera with professional controls AND a computer that could go anywhere with me with all of the features and software necessary to field produce anything from a youtube video to full production of a movie.

Until this week, that would have been a Macbook Pro and Final Cut Studio with the latest, best version of Final Cut Pro.

Last week’s unveiling of Final Cut X didn’t faze me…initially. I figured I could do as Apple recommended and run both the old FCP and new version on my screaming new Macbook Pro. But two things happened. Apple PULLED all on-shelf copies of FCS 3…effectively eliminating any possible purchase of a new copy. Then the bidding on auction sites went from three or four hundred to double that and more for used versions…even academic versions.

That’s when I began to reconsider my loyalties.

And that is why I found myself an hour ago researching Windows based laptops and appealing to friends for recommendations for a new (non-Apple) laptop that would allow me to take advantage of some pretty good discounts being offered by AVID and Adobe.

I’m not sure where this is heading…perhaps my heart will rule and I’ll remain an Apple supporter…or my head and pocketbook will turn me to what I’ve always jokingly called “the dark side.”

I do know, having used FCP, that it IS the software I want. But I don’t necessarily want to support an orphan. I want to know where Apple is going with Final Cut X – so I can make my decision easily. In lieu of that…perhaps a late life shake-up is in order.


February 27 2011

08:19

Producing Audio Slideshows with Final Cut Pro

One of a Kind in the World Museum

In 2005, Joe Weiss released Soundslides, a killer audio slideshow production program that helped transition many newspaper photojournalists into the world of online multimedia. Audio slideshows soon flooded newspaper websites. Its simple interface and even simpler learning curve proved a perfect match for anyone wanting to add an audio narrative to their online picture stories.

But times have changed. Many of those same photojournalists moved on to add video to their storytelling toolboxes. As they began to master video editing programs like Apple’s Final Cut Pro or Adobe Premiere Pro, it seemed like no brainer to use them to produce audioslide shows.  I cannot say building an audio slide show is easier with a video editing program, but it does afford you some added features that are hard, if not impossible, to replicate in Soundslides.

Here are some of the things I’ve learned when making an audio slideshow using Apple’s Final Cut Pro:

  • Soundslides is great at taking all the tedious production out of the process. It grabs all your photos in a file and automatically sizes them for the web. When producing in a video editor, you have to do all this image prep yourself. But it’s not too bad if you create a Photoshop action to automate the process.  I create a one-click action to reduce the image dpi to 72 and size to each photo to a width of 2500 pixels. This size makes the images large enough to use motion on later if needed.
  • Before you start to edit, it is important to set up your timeline as an HD project. It makes the photos look so much better, even after you compress the hell out of them later for the web. I generally pick Apple Intermediate Codec 720p30 from the “Easy Setup” menu. I think progressive timelines without the interlacing work best for photos. I’ve even used the XDCAM 1080p30 setting with great results.
  • As I assemble my story, I tend to build as I go. I start editing at the beginning with audio, then layer on my photos. I use the voiceover tool in Final Cut Pro to record my script narrative direct to the timeline. This is just how I do it. There are many ways to edit. You may like to have the whole project storyboarded out before you start your edit. Do whatever works best for you.
  • I really try to scale up each photo to fill my Canvas viewer. This looks so much better than having black bars showing above and below the image.
  • One of the nice things about producing audio slideshows in a video editor is the ability to display multiple photos at once in the Canvas viewer. This solves the vertical photo issue of trying fill a horizontal space with a vertical rectangle. I like to fade in my vertical photos on the far left or right of my frame then fade in another image to fill the rest of the frame. Click image below to see and example of using multiple photos in one window.

 

Mount St. Helens comes to town

  • In Soundslides the default is to add a cross-fade to every image. I see a trend away from this as more people edit in video programs.  Most of the time I just use quick cut between photos. It took me awhile to break the cross fade habit, but now I see how much better a show flows without all that cross fading. It also makes it easier to edit to a beat in the audio.
  • I tend to edit an audio slide show like I edit a video story. I try to use sequences of images that help move the story through time and place. I try to mix up the photo selection by using a mix of wide, medium and tight shots just like I do with video.
  • Use motion on photos with caution. Most of the time, slower is better. You don’t want to make the viewer seasick. Try not to zigzag all over the place. Use motion on a photo to reveal or isolate something that pertains to the story. I like to put a very slow pull or push on a photo that is almost not noticeable. It adds just a little kick to a static photo. One last suggestion on using motion with photos; If you are pulling out on a photo and your next image has motion too, make that one zoom in; otherwise it makes the viewer feel like they are heading through a tunnel.
  • Finally, the other added benefit of producing audio slide shows in a video editor is that it brings all your multimedia under one player for your website. If your video player has embed ability, it makes it easier for viewers to share your story and make it go viral.

January 07 2011

16:45

Learning How to Teach Multimedia Journalism







Education content on MediaShift is sponsored by the USC Annenberg nine-month M.A. in Specialized Journalism. USC's highly customized degree programs are tailored to the experienced journalist and gifted amateur. Learn more about how USC Annenberg is immersed in tomorrow.

Doing multimedia journalism and teaching it are two very different things. The past semester marked my first as an adjunct professor. It was probably the best thing I could have done for my own education.

At KPBS, I've produced online news content using audio, video, photography, slideshows, visualizations, social and interactive media. So when I was offered the opportunity to teach a multimedia journalism course at a local university, I jumped right in. After all, I had already led a number of training workshops. This is going to be easy, right? Yeah, right.

Teaching vs. Training

In the fall of 2010, Point Loma Nazarene University added a new upper-level course, Multimedia Journalism (WRI 430), as a requirement for its Journalism and Broadcast Journalism majors. I was brought on to teach the class the summer before it would begin. During my interview with the school's journalism faculty, I was asked two questions that changed how I would approach the class:

"You have some experience doing multimedia training, but what do you see as the difference between 'training' and 'teaching'?"

"Your suggested curriculum has a lot of technology listed here, but where does that fit into storytelling?"

In my haste to outline how I would train students in multimedia, I focused more on learning the tools. Of course, the purpose is always storytelling. And my role wasn't merely to train them to use tools (workshop style) -- I needed to teach them how to become multimedia storytellers.

Learning Never Ends

Software is temporary; new tools and never-ending feature upgrades require constant learning. I've learned my share of dead programs (anyone else remember Authorware?). But regardless of the tools we use, there are core principles underlying how we communicate through different media. I needed to help students adapt to -- and thrive in -- the change they would inevitably witness during their careers.

So how exactly do you teach someone how to learn? Throw them in the deep end. I had to almost force myself not to teach them how to use the software in order to let them to find the answers for themselves. "Ask Google" and "the Help menu is your friend" were mantras of the class. I did give brief introductions to point them in the right direction, but then I let them sort out the details.

Getting Started

Final Cut ProNew to the school's facilities, I toured the lab to confirm what programs were installed before planning assignments. Final Cut Pro, check. Photoshop, check. Those are key programs, but multimedia projects often require lots of extra apps to get things done (Audacity, SoundSlides, MPEGStreamClip, CyberDuck, etc.). Unfortunately, as is common in academic labs, software requests needed to have been submitted several months in advance; it was too late for me to get anything added. This was a blessing in disguise because limitations can inspire creativity. It also gave me a chance to apply a concept KPBS will be experimenting with in 2011: Using Final Cut as the single program for doing radio, video and audio slideshows.

In preparing the curriculum, I bookmarked syllabi, blog posts and assignments other professors had generously published online. This gave me a general framework, but ultimately couldn't give me everything I needed. My course would fit within the structure of a specific school's curriculum. I put together a schedule, ordering the assignments to build on each other:

  1. Podcast on multimedia journalism: Use clips from Multimedia Standards, write and record voiceover.
  2. Storytelling through audio: Allow the subject's voice to tell the story without a narrator. Use sound to create a scene.
  3. Storytelling through a still image: Use one image with caption to illustrate a story.
  4. Storytelling through a photo series: Create a narrative through a combination of wide, medium, and close-up perspectives.
  5. Storytelling through audio slideshow: Combine concept of audio story with narrative series of photos.
  6. Storytelling in video: Show action in a series of edited clips to accompany a story.
  7. Storytelling through data visualization: Use spreadsheet to graph data, optimized for clear interpretation.
  8. Storytelling through maps: Make location-based information useful through an interactive map.

Present and Critique

My class was small enough to use an approach you would see in a studio art class. I gave a brief lecture on a topic and then gave an assignment. By next class they needed to have work to present. During class, students talked about each other's work and critiqued what did and didn't work. By the next class, they needed to have integrated that feedback and have published their final work.

This process of seeing work before and after also made for an effective grading practice. It was a clear gauge of effort to see if they incorporated changes. I also wanted them to have the experience of taking feedback, and more importantly, to learn how to give analytical criticism in a productive and professional way.

In addition to these projects, I required weekly social media updates: Share a story on Google Reader, bookmark a link on Delicious, and post to Twitter. I've spent enough time helping reporters integrate Twitter into their process to be determined not to let my students get by without dominating these elements. Yahoo's announcement about wanting to sell Delicious underscores the need to focus on the concept rather than the app itself: Track sources, save links and share updates throughout the process. As a sign of success, students are maintaining their updates even after the semester ended.

Putting It Into Practice

KPBS Story IllustrationWe were fortunate to have an election during the fall semester, so I took the class downtown on election night. They live tweeted, posted photos of candidates and supporters to Flickr, and published pie charts of election results using Google Spreadsheets. KPBS used the charts online and two students had their photos selected for stories. Students gained practical experience and broader exposure by collaborating with the local public media outlet.

By the end of the semester, we were able to have robust discussions about which medium would be most effective for a particular story. And that, in a nutshell, is where successful multimedia stories begin.

Teaching as a professional adjunct clarified the distinction between a training workshop and a university course. Workshops are great for quick skill building, but they don't compare to four months of constant practice, feedback and growth with a mentor challenging you along the way.

Nathan Gibbs teaches multimedia journalism as an adjunct instructor for Point Loma Nazarene University and the SDSU Digital and Social Media Collaborative. Gibbs oversees multimedia content as web producer for KPBS, the PBS and NPR affiliate in San Diego. He played a key role in the station's groundbreaking use of social media during the 2007 Southern California wildfires and continues to drive interactive strategy. Gibbs is on Twitter as @nathangibbs and runs Modern Journalist, a blog for journalists exploring multimedia.







Education content on MediaShift is sponsored by the USC Annenberg nine-month M.A. in Specialized Journalism. USC's highly customized degree programs are tailored to the experienced journalist and gifted amateur. Learn more about how USC Annenberg is immersed in tomorrow.

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November 23 2010

18:56

MediaStorm’s Guide to Using Subtitles

Sometimes the most difficult challenge regarding subtitles is deciding whether to use them or not.

Subtitles present obvious aesthetic challenges—from inevitably covering the most important part of an image to turning a visual experience into a written one. If at all possible, avoid them; the obvious exception being when someone speaks a language other than that of the intended audience. Then subtitles are essential.

So how do you know if you need English subtitles for someone speaking English? It’s often difficult for a producer to make this call. After listening to the same clips again and again, we learn a speaker’s cadence and nuances and they become clearer to us. Probably the best method to make this determination is to play your project for a group of people who haven’t seen it yet and see if they can understand the narration without subtitles.

With fresh ears, they’ll quickly let you know if they’re able to follow along. If there’s any confusion, use subtitles; the most captivating visuals are useless if your audience can’t understand what’s going on.

Here are some other subtitle guidelines you may find useful:

  • Keep all of your subtitles on the same video channel in Final Cut. No other graphic or video elements should be on that channel. Just subtitles. This will help your organization and make things much easier when you need to add a drop shadow, which I will discuss later.
  • Avoid fonts with serifs, particularly small ones. Serifs tend to fall apart when a project is compressed to smaller dimensions. MediaStorm’s style is to use 18pt Arial bold.
  • Drop shadows are imperative. They help separate the subtitle text from images and video. To see their importance, place a drop-shadow subtitle above complex imagery. Now turn the effect on and off. The difference is striking. We use the drop-shadow settings below in Final Cut:
  • When an image changes, so should the subtitle. Don’t let subtitles bleed over onto the next image, or you’ll create visual confusion as subtitles seemingly appear and disappear at random.
  • Keep subtitles to one line only. Avoid wrapping them onto a second line as this, too, will create confusion when subtitles jump between one and two lines of text.
  • If your subtitles do not fit on one line but your image remains the same, you’ll need to cut to a second subtitle. To do this, start the first subtitle when the image begins. Cut to the second subtitle approximately 10 frames before the next word is spoken. This way, you’ll retain the pacing of your narrator, and the drama of your project, by not revealing what’s said before you need to.
  • At the beginning of a new cut, if there’s a pause of more than a second before someone speaks, fade up the subtitle with an eight-frame dissolve. The dissolve should complete approximately 15 frames, or half a second, before the person speaks.
  • If you intend to broadcast your project, make sure your subtitles are broadcast-safe. To create broadcast-safe subtitles in Final Cut, from the top right pulldown menu in the Canvas window select Show Overlays Show and Show Title Safe. The title safe region is within the boundaries of the inner rectangle (when you are working in 16:9).
  • Make a subtitle template. Create one subtitle with the proper font, size, and drop shadow. Before using this as your template, though, turn off the drop shadow as it will cause extra rendering. Next, using option-drag, copy the subtitle block to its next location. Double-click the subtitle to load it into the Viewer window. Then, using your transcript, paste in the proper text.

    When you have added all your subtitles, turn on the drop shadows on your first clip. Select it, then use the keystroke command-C to copy.

    To paste the drop shadow on all the other subtitles, select the additional clips using the T tool. Then press option-V to paste the attributes. Select drop shadow from the pop-up window.

May 15 2010

07:23

When Mount St. Helens came to (my) town

Thirty years ago on May 18, 1980, I was a senior in high school in Spokane, Washington. It was Sunday afternoon and I was still feeling the pain from a beer-induced hangover, you know, the only kind you can get when your best friend Russ throws an  “End of High School” party for most of the senior class.

I grabbed a cup of coffee and went out on Russ’s front porch.  Glancing up at the sky I was perplexed at what I saw. Instead of blue sky, it was brown with a pillow texture to it. “ Must be a dust storm coming,” said my friend’s father who also had no answer for weird brown sky. Suddenly, a robin came fluttering in front of us. It dove hard, landing dead on impact at my feet. I gingerly picked the bird up and when I shook it, a small cloud of dust came off its wings.  What the…

I would soon find out that Mount St. Helens, 290 miles away, had literally exploded in a cataclysmic volcanic eruption. The best part? A dark cloud of ash would soon turn  daylight into darkness. It rained ash overnight and part of the next day. For the next week communities in Central and Eastern Washington banded together to clean up the mess. Ask anyone who experienced the ash fall and I’ll guarantee they’ll have a story to tell.

A week ago, it was politely suggested to me that I should do a multimedia piece for the Mount St. Helens 30th anniversary coming up.

“Sure I can do that, I said. “I’m sure we have tons of photos in the digital archive.”

A quick look showed only a few pictures from that time, many of which had been used over and over. A trip in the print photo archive left me nowhere. It was as if Mount St. Helens ash never came to Spokane. “ Where the hell were all the photos”?

Searching the negative archive I found the whole weeks worth of negatives missing from the box. About to give up, I walked to the far dark corner of the neg room on a hunch. I found a shelf of orphan negative boxes labeled with old projects I was hard pressed to remember.  Running my finger down the labels I stopped on the three words: “Mount St. Helens. “

Bingo!

I think over the years and many volcano anniversaries later, long gone photo editors found that putting all the prints and negs in one box was a good idea. If I hadn’t made that turn into a dark corner, this audio slideshow would have been pretty lame.

My next chore was to find someone willing to write and voice a narrative that would reflect the content of the photos I had edited together.  My go-to guy for historical narratives is staff writer Jim Kershner.

“You wanna do a Looking Back piece for St. Helen 30th”? I asked Kershner.

I could tell Kershner was swamped, but he said he could probably crank something out by the next afternoon.  I told Kershner just to write the story of the first week in Spokane and I would match the photos up with whatever he  wrote.  The next day as I was pawing through old unlabeled negative sheets, Kershner arrived with a killer script in hand. Only two takes later, I was ready to start assembling our St Helens story.  I like to use Final Cut Pro as I find it gives me the most flexibility with photos. I can color correct, put motion on the photo, create multi-photo windows where I can time the show to the beat of the music.

The fun part of this story for me was really the detective part, where I had to find a photo that would match the narrative. When Kershner said “Soon taverns and golf courses began to reopen,” I was lucky enough to find a photo from that week  showing rednecks covered in ash drinking tavern beer and a group of lady golfers walking an ash-laden course.

For music, our company has an extensive Digital Juice music library I can use for multimedia projects such as this. I also used a couple of Garage Band stingers– short mood building clips–that helped set the ominous tone of the ash cloud coming our way.

All in all, it was a fun project to do in such a short amount of time.


May 03 2010

07:16

Feedback website “Finding the Frame” launches

Finding the Frame, a website dedicated to giving feedback to newspaper multimedia producers and video journalists has launched.

My post in Mastering Multimedia last month,  “Video at newspapers needs to improve,” resonated with many people. I received lots emails from producers who vented their frustration at not being able to get feedback on their multimedia stories.

After a brainstorming session over a few beers, Brian Immel, a former multimedia producer and programmer at The Spokesman-Review, graciously agreed to build a website for the sole purpose of connecting those who need feedback on their multimedia, to professionals willing to share some time and knowledge.

Here’s how it works

The plan is to have onboard as many “expert” volunteers as possible that have solid foundations in video storytelling, audio slide shows or Flash projects. This pool of reviewers will peruse the submitted links of multimedia in the “Story Pool”. If they decide to comment on a story, it will then become public on the Finding the Frame home page where anyone else is free to give added feedback.

So why do this?

While most publications have driven head first into the online world, multimedia storytelling is still in its infancy at many newspapers. Unfortunately, not all people tasked with producing multimedia received adequate training or had the financial ability to attend a multimedia storytelling workshop. Many multimedia producers are self-taught, having picked up bit and pieces of knowledge along the way.

When I judge a multimedia contest, I often get frustrated at seeing the same problems in the execution of basic video and audio production fundamentals. Many photojournalists are struggling with how to tell an effective video or audio slideshow story that is different from the traditional still picture story.

Our hope is that Finding the Frame will begin to address the need for feedback and in turn, help multimedia producers improve their storytelling. Just read some of the comments by reviewers so far–you’ll be impressed. The professionals that have signed on as reviewers are the some of the top in the industry. If they critique your story, please thank them for giving up some of their precious time to help out a fellow visual journalist.

What we need

What we need is for enough producers, multimedia editors and photojournalists who have a solid experience with multimedia storytelling to step forward and share some of their knowledge with those that are looking for constructive, honest feedback.

So if you feel you have something to offer, we would really like you to join the pool of reviewers on Finding the Frame.

So go check it out and give Brian and me some feedback. Create an account. Upload a link to a video, audio slide show or Flash project. Be patient, as it might take some time for your story to get reviewed

I am not sure how many people will upload stories, so let’s take this slow at first. It would also be helpful if non-reviewers could give some feedback to others by commenting on their work.

If you would like to be added to the reviewer pool, register your account, making sure you create a profile and upload a photo of yourself or avatar, then email me at cmulvany@findingtheframe.com with the request.

This website is for you. We would really appreciate your support and feedback.


January 21 2010

18:14

Mastering Multimedia useful tips roundup


Many of may old posts that deal with tips about how to do video storytelling and audio slideshows get linked on a lot of blogs used by college professors who teach digital media classes. Most of these posts are buried amongst my pontifications about the changes facing the newspaper industry. So for anyone interested,  here is a roundup of my best multimedia suggestions and useful tip posts in one place…

How to make your audio slideshows better

Great audio starts in the field

How best to approach a video story

Sequencing: The foundation of video storytelling

How to make your video editing easier

Get creative with your video camera

Opening your video: How not to lose viewers

Random Final Cut tip: Lower thirds titles

What we can learn from TV new shooters

January 05 2010

15:59

The Kalish now accepting applications for 2010 – deadline May 15

Screen shot 2010-01-05 at 10.52.25 AM

Can you work hard and have fun at the same time? Are you looking for a workshop you can afford? Would you like to work elbow to-elbow with some of the best visual editors in the country? Can you bowl? The 2010 Kalish is open for business and accepting applications for the 21st edition of this venerable visual editing workshop. It’s an opportunity to learn cross-platform/multimedia skills from a faculty of Emmy and Pulitzer Prize winning visual editors. Brian Storm, Geri Migielicz, Sue Morrow, Randy Cox and Kenny Irby will be on the faculty this year along with other industry experts. The core faculty has worked together on this program for many years and most of them stay through the duration of the workshop providing ample time to answer your questions. Last year we closed registration at 30 people and attracted a diverse group of working professionals, students and professors from six countries. It was one of our most successful workshops and this year should be better.

The Kalish enjoys a great reputation industry wide and after much thought, and vigorous eye-brow raising, The Kalish board, with the support of the National Press Photographers Foundation, have decided to keep the registration fee for this year’s workshop at $500. It’s the lowest rate you’ll find for a workshop of this quality. You’ll receive four full days (June 4-8) of intense hands-on instruction in cross-platform visual storytelling.

The traditional Kalish values of ethical decision making in journalism and management remain. The workshop begins with a primer in FinalCutPro, progresses through picture selection, multiple picture editing and news judgment, to multimedia and management.

The days are long and packed with real-life decision making exercises in visual storytelling. You will be expected to make difficult decisions about visual storytelling and then defend them in front of the group. We work hard and then we play hard. Please ask any Kalish alum about their experience with us, they are our best references. You can hear testimonials and learn more about the workshop at www.kalishworkshop.org.

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