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August 10 2012

15:53

April 27 2012

17:40

Poll: Where Are Your Favorite Places to Share Photos?

You recently went on vacation to an exotic and new locale and you want to show people your great photos from the trip. So where do you post them online? Are you a fan of Flickr or Facebook? What about Instagram? Or perhaps you're part of the thriving photography community on Google+. And let's not forget the old school folks who still prefer getting photo prints and putting them in an actual real physical photo album! Vote in our poll -- you can vote for multiple items -- and explain in the comments what makes a good photo-sharing service for you.


Where are your favorite places to share photos?

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13:38

Mediatwits #46: Photography Special: Creative Commons, Cameraphones, Instagram, Google+

rafat photo.jpg

Welcome to the 46th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rafat Ali as co-hosts. Rafat is celebrating his birthday, we're not sure how old he is, but we know that he loves photography. So this week we are celebrating his birthday by doing a special show focused on photography in the digital age. Our roundtable includes crack professional photographer Gregor Halenda, photo and multimedia guru Brian Storm and social photographer extraordinaire Thomas Hawk in a wide-ranging discussion.

First is the debate over rights: Is it a good idea to post your photos on social media under a Creative Commons license? Or should you be more restrictive of your photos online? We also talk about the state of stock photography and the democratization of photography now that the tools are more accessible -- and everyone has a potential global reach online. And what about the rise of amazing cameraphones, apps and filters? Now that Instagram has been bought by Facebook for $1 billion, what's the implication about the future of photo-sharing and filters? Thomas Hawk also cites Google+ as being a hotbed of photography. How did it surpass Facebook?

Check it out!

mediatwits46.mp3

Subscribe to the podcast here

Subscribe to Mediatwits via iTunes

Follow @TheMediatwits on Twitter here

Our show is now on Stitcher and being featured there! Listen to us on your iPhone, Android Phone, Kindle Fire and other devices with Stitcher. Find Stitcher in your app store or at stitcher.com.

Intro and outro music by 3 Feet Up; mid-podcast music by Autumn Eyes via Mevio's Music Alley.

thomas hawk.jpg

Here are some highlighted topics from the show:

Intro

0:20: Happy birthday to Rafat!

2:15: Rafat got the photography bug in last two years

4:00: Pro photographers threatened by rise of amateurs

Creative Commons a good thing?

6:00: Special guests Thomas Hawk, Brian Storm and Gregor Halenda

8:30: Flickr has even started to innovate, along with newer players

10:20: Halenda: I won't post on Flickr or under Creative Commons, I want to be paid

gregor_halenda.jpg

13:20: Hawk: There are examples of pro photogs making a business from posting online

What skills do photographers need now?

15:00: Storm: Schools are teaching kids everything -- photography, video and multimedia

18:00: Halenda: Stock photography can't support pros anymore

20:10: Storm: Everyone has tools and distribution so now it's all about quality

22:10: Hawk: Google+ lets you share circles of photographers with all followers

Cameraphones get ever more powerful

25:30: High-end cameras are still selling well

BrianStorm.jpg

27:30: Hawk likes Camera Awesome as one of his favorite photo apps

29:40: Halenda says knowing Photoshop is essential to pro photography

32:30: Storm helped start "The Week in Pictures" at MSNBC.com in 1998 as pioneer; had 100 million page views last month

More Reading

Photojournalists Scramble to Video. Is it Worth It? at MediaShift

Digital camera sales defy smartphone onslaught at the Globe and Mail

Zuckerberg announces Instagram purchase on Facebook

Camera Awesome app

Thomas Hawk on Google+

Gregor Halenda Photography

MediaStorm

The Week in Pictures at MSNBC.com

The Big Picture at Boston.com

Lens blog at NY Times

Guardian Eyewitness app

Flickr Creative Commons images

Creative Commons' Images blog

Creative Commons + Flickr = 22 Million Sharable Photos at MediaShift

The Digital Journalist

Weekly Poll

Don't forget to vote in our weekly poll, this time about where you share photos:


Where are your favorite places to share photos?

Mark Glaser is executive editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He also writes the bi-weekly OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. He lives in San Francisco with his son Julian. You can follow him on Twitter @mediatwit. and Circle him on Google+

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April 20 2012

14:14

Community hangout – lessons learned from the experiment

Last week Net2 Local organizers community participated in the very first Google + Hangout. Local innovators gathered to experiment with the (not so much) new Google tool.

Lesson #1 – if you want to experiment – do it openly, it is more fun and you can learn much more

Overall, the experiment was a very good experience, mostly because we did it together - community members from Adelaide, Manchester, Philadelphia, Vancouver, Tokyo, Singapore and Warsaw. There are few things we can examine together in real time, being able to see each other at the same time. The experimental hangout was announced on the Net2 Local organizers Google list in order to keep it inside the community, but also open – anybody from the community could join any time. There was no schedule, except the “opening hour”. We had surprise show ups from Vancouver and Tokyo but also very devoted group to try out every possible g+ hangout app almost for the entire hour. Now we all know that it works on ipads (but they don’t show the chat bar) and that one can wear fake pirate hat during all the meeting. However, there is no more cat face app anymore. 

print screen on Net2 hangout

Lesson #2 – Know who to invite and keep them in a circle

One of the problems I didn’t think about was that a hangout can be open to all the people from your circles. It means that you need to have them in a circle before you start a hangout. If you want to hang out with people who are not yet in any of your circles, make sure you have easy access either to their e-mails or to their g+ accounts. I got stuck for 10 min trying to invite people to private chat and finding their e-mails. It would be easier to have all the addresses on the list or a circle ready to be used.
I tried to bypass this by opening the meeting completely and doing it as a “public” one, but it finished with a social disaster and awkwardness when the meeting was joined by 3 strangers who just kept on staring at me plus one guy who kept on singing (aloud) disturbing the meeting (and yes, you can mute somebody and yes, you can block somebody too – it is a very useful tool)

Lesson #3 – Experiment together

If you do it for the first time and most of the attendees are not familiar with it as well, put aside some time to experiment with it and with all the apps too. There is nothing but benefits here. You as the organizer will feel safer, because you get some more time to manage the tool while everybody’s having fun. And at the end, we all feel safer using all the shiny and playful new toys.

Have you got any experiences with Google+ Hangout tool? Do you have any more tips? Any special “how to” ingredients or methods? Please share it in the comments.

I want also to thank to my dear beta testers: Ben, Steven, Aseem, Seth, Elijah and Ichi.

We will come back to the Hangouts soon, so stay tuned!

January 23 2012

14:50

Daily Must Reads, Jan. 23, 2012

The best stories across the web on media and technology, curated by Lily Leung


1. AP CEO Tom Curley, who led company into digital space, to retire (Poynter)

2. Twitter reacts to death of Joe Paterno (Mashable)

3. White House joins Google+ (Los Angeles Times)


4. Apple enters the $8 billion industry of K-12 textbooks (paidcontent.org)



5. Tablet and e-reader sales soar (New York Times)

6. Twitter's Jack Dorsey talks social, SOPA and Asia (All Things D)


Subscribe to our daily Must Reads email newsletter and get the links in your in-box every weekday!



Subscribe to Daily Must Reads newsletter

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January 18 2012

23:10

Your Guide to the Anti-SOPA Protests

Today was an important day in the history of the Internet and activism. While the U.S. Congress expected to quickly pass two bills, the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA), mounting opposition online has led them to reconsider. That all came to a head today when various sites such as Wikipedia and Reddit decided to black out their content, and others such as Google put up anti-SOPA messages on their sites. The following is a Storify aggregation of all those efforts, including explainers, stories, tweets, parody videos and more.

[View the story "A Guide to the Anti-SOPA Protests" on Storify]

Mark Glaser is executive editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He also writes the bi-weekly OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. He lives in San Francisco with his son Julian. You can follow him on Twitter @mediatwit. and Circle him on Google+

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January 13 2012

15:20

Mediatwits #33: CES Jumped the Shark?; SOPA Battles; Google+ in Search

Welcome to the 33rd episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali. This week we have a special show focused on the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) happening in Las Vegas all week. Apple isn't there and Microsoft did its last keynote presentation there. Is the show losing momentum? Are we all burned out on gadgets and flatter TVs? We talk to two tech journalists on the CES floor, Rob Pegoraro and TechDirt's Mike Masnick, about the various new TV sets, tablets and smartphones. Plus, Masnick gives us an update about how the CEA and many folks at the show are overwhelmingly opposed to the two anti-piracy bills, SOPA and PIPA, before Congress.

Meanwhile, search giant Google caused a stir by integrating Google+ much more deeply into its search results. The new "Search Plus Your World" has been criticized as unfairly giving Google+ an advantage over Twitter and Facebook in search results. Google responded by saying that it was upset that Twitter didn't renew its contract to be included in search results. Will this move bring more trouble to Google, with the Feds already investigating the company over privacy issues?

Check it out!

mediatwits33.mp3

Subscribe to the podcast here

Subscribe to Mediatwits via iTunes

Follow @TheMediatwits on Twitter here

Intro and outro music by 3 Feet Up; mid-podcast music by Autumn Eyes via Mevio's Music Alley.

Here are some highlighted topics from the show:

Intro

1:00: Background on the CES show

3:00: Journalists weary and tired of CES now?

4:00: The pain of CES

4:45: Rundown of topics on the show

Report from CES

portrait-with-cables.jpeg

5:15: Special guests from CES: Rob Pegoraro and Mike Masnick

6:10: How is this show different than previous shows?

7:50: Masnick: Thin TVs are impressive

10:40: Pegoraro: Color e-ink readers might boost e-readers

13:30: Masnick: Hard to see disruptive technology at first

CEA opposing SOPA

16:10: Many people at CES are opposing Stop Online Piracy Act, including Consumer Electronics Association

19:20: Why SOPA went too far

20:00: Pegoraro: History of greedy, restrictive bills put forward by entertainment industry

22:05: Masnick: When entertainment biz loses fights, they often still win

mike masnick hands.jpg

Google integrates Google+ in search

24:00: Mark gives background on move by Google

26:40: Why can't Google put social, private search in a new tab?

29:10: Facebook, Twitter are feeling left out of Google search

More Reading

CNET's Best of CES at CNET

CES XV at RobPegoraro.com

Tech Charms: Flying Cameras, Musical Purses at WSJ

Desperation Of SOPA/PIPA Supporters On Display At CES at TechDirt

Boo-Freaking-Hoo: RIAA Complains That 'The Deck Is Stacked' Against Them On CES Panels at TechDirt

Author of Controversial Piracy Bill Now Says 'More Study' Needed at WSJ Digits

Google's Results Get More Personal With Search Plus Your World at Search Engine Land

Is adding Google+ to search a red flag for regulators? at GigaOm

Search Plus Your World -- As Long As Its Our World at SearchBlog

Compete to Death or Cooperate to Compete? at SearchBlog

Weekly Poll

Don't forget to vote in our weekly poll, this time about the CES show:


The Consumer Electronics Show is...

Mark Glaser is executive editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He also writes the bi-weekly OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. He lives in San Francisco with his son Julian. You can follow him on Twitter @mediatwit. and Circle him on Google+

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January 12 2012

16:37

Daily Must Reads, Jan. 12, 2012

The best stories across the web on media and technology, curated by Nathan Gibbs


1. The Philadelphia Experiment: Why a media company wants to be a tech incubator (Nieman Journalism Lab) 

2. The magical (and sometimes ridiculous) gadgets of tomorrow (The Wirecutter)

3. Inside the NYT's hyper-local efforts (Street Fight)

4. Disqus: People using pseudonyms post the highest-quality comments (Poynter)

5. How Google+ Hangouts could transform traditional TV broadcasting (Lost Remote)

6. Homeland Security watches Twitter, social media (Reuters)



7. Critics see 'disaster' in expansion of domain names (NPR)


Subscribe to our daily Must Reads email newsletter and get the links in your in-box every weekday!



Subscribe to Daily Must Reads newsletter

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January 10 2012

17:07

December 19 2011

15:20

What I Want for Christmas: A Frictionless Blogging Platform

For those who don't know -- the Carnival of Journalism is something I restarted in January (coming up on a year!) where a bunch of journalism-bloggers get together and write about the same topic once a month. The question is posed by the host -- who rotates.

santas.jpg

This month's host is the Guardian's developer blog, and they ask:

If you are a journalist, what would be the best present from programmers and developers that Santa Claus could leave under your Christmas tree? And, correspondingly, if you are a programmer or developer, what would be the best present from journalism that Father Christmas could deliver down your chimney?

If I had to answer the question succinctly: I want a frictionless blogging platform. Not Tumblr or Posterous (although they've done an awesome job). I think there is a way to make something even simpler -- a platform where I can save something to Delicious and create the formatting once so that from henceforth all Delicious links will be posted on my blog the way I want. (ITTF does an OK job, but it's not perfect).

I go through various phases with my personal blog. When I first started in 2005, it was called "Adventures in Freelancing," and it was about just that -- the various stories I was working on or published or other stories I was reading and found interesting.

Since Spot.Us started, my blogging has laxed (at best). I use it for occasional big thoughts or announcements. Twitter, Tumblr, Facebook, Google+, etc., take up a much larger space of my "online productivity" and to be honest -- I wish there were ways to streamline my efforts.

Of course, there is IFTT.com -- which is what I'm using to repost this Google+ update to my personal blog. And from my blog, it will then automatically be tweeted. So that's a start.

But there are things lost in the translation from Google+ to my personal blog and back out to Twitter.

In a strange way, I still think what I'm looking for is FriendFeed. What a brilliant site that was. Too bad they were bought (talent-scouted) by Facebook.

So I want a platform where I can post something on Google+, and format it once and forever, and my Google+ public posts will appear on my blog the way I want.

That's my holiday gift ask.

Image courtesy of Flickr user Steve Rhodes.

A version of this post first appeared here.

December 11 2011

08:02

News distribution - Google plans to combine Gmail with Google+ Circles

What have Google's Gmail integration plans to do with the future of journalism? - It is one answer to the question, how news will be distributed in the (near) future.

Digital Trends :: Mentioned on the official Gmail blog this week, Google announced plans to integrate Google+ Circles into the Gmail interface and has already started rolling out this new feature on Gmail accounts. On the left side of the interface, Gmail users will find a new link that brings up all Circles connected to their Google+ account. Users have the ability to add someone to a Circle through the Gmail interface. When clicking on an email from any contact that also has a Google+ account, Gmail users will be able to view the most recent Google+ wall post from that person on the right hand side of the screen next to the email message.

Continue to read Mike Flacy, www.digitaltrends.com

December 10 2011

17:42

1+ shares, likes, and tweet counts: Google Search now with social insight stats

The Next Web :: Google is constantly beefing up its search results. You can now find out who in your social network has +1′d a page, who has shared it on Google+, and even makes it easy to add bloggers to your Google+ circles right from your search results. If you want to find out a bit more about how your search results are being shared on other social networks, you can use the brand new site, Google with Social Stats.


Clipped from: ctrlq.org (share this clip)

Put together by Amit Agarwal of Digital Inspiration, search results are accompanied by Facebook likes, Tweet counts and Google+ shares. This kind of data can be interesting if you want to find out if a page has been shared extensively before sharing it with your followers and friends.

Continue to read Nancy Messieh, thenextweb.com

17:27

Eric Schmidt at Le Web: announces "noise control" to filter your Google+ stream

Search Engine Watch :: Google plans to add filtering mechanisms to Google+, allowing users to receive more relevant social content as the company seeks to challenge rival Facebook. "Noise control" will soon be added to the social site, and "we have a team figuring out how to do it right now," Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt said at the Le Web conference in Paris.

Continue to read searchenginewatch.com

December 08 2011

22:16

"Find my face" - Google+ photo app now with facial recognition (opt-in of course)

TechCrunch :: No, Google is not launching super-creepy facial recognition, so put those pitchforks down. But it is introducing a new feature to Google+’s photo app, which now makes it a bit easier to quickly tag your friends. It’s called ‘Find My Face’, and while the name leads me to recall scenes in the classic Nic Cage/John Travolta film Face/Off, it’s a feature that plenty of users will find handy.

Continue to read Jason Kincaid, techcrunch.com

21:51

Twitter's special gift: brand pages for advertisers

AdAge :: Twitter is looking to strengthen its relationship with advertisers by launching brand pages that will be unveiled today as part of a more comprehensive redesign.

Twitter's existing brand pages have been under the radar, especially compared with the buildup around Google+ brand pages, which were launched last month. But Chief Revenue Officer Adam Bain said that he's spent the better part of the past year meeting with chief marketing officers, and brand pages were a recurring and frequent request.

Continue to read Cotton Delo, adage.com

November 14 2011

21:53

YouTube gets a Google+ Facelift

Keith Wagstaff, Techland, tells us, what we can expect from Google's latest makeover:

Techland :: YouTube is the latest Google property to get a Google+ makeover, just a few weeks after Google Reader got ethe same mixed reviews. While the changes aren’t huge, The Next Web‘s photos do show an increased integration of Google’s social network, plus a few other tweaks as well.

Continue to read a Keith Wagstaff, techland.time.com

21:45

A Newsroom Primer: Starting Fresh With Google+ Brand Pages

If newsrooms avoided creating an account on Google+ when the product asked brands to stay away, the time has come to build your brand inside the social-networking tool. Last week, Google opened up brand pages for all to use.

But before you set it up, there's an important thing you need to know: You can set up a brand page that is attached to your personal Google account, but at this point, only one person can manage a brand page.

My newsroom had an already existing Google account (that had a profile suspended on Google+ when it initially launched because brands were not allowed inside the social network). I rebuilt the new KOMU 8 News page using that Google account because it means I have a core group of people who have access to the username and password without having to give away my personal username and password. It also means you have to bounce between different browsers to manage your personal account and the brand account. There are pros and cons to both options. Either way, you have to agree to Google Pages' Terms of Service before you can move forward.

setting up your brand

komugoogle+.png

Once you agree to the terms, you have a chance to add your brand's avatar and create a tagline. This is the short summary of your brand that anyone will see when they look it up. You want to be concise and have fun with it if you can. My newsroom is focused on mid-Missouri, but Google+ has helped us expand our coverage. So our tagline is "Mid-MO and beyond. The most innovative + in the news biz." The New York Times' Google+ page says, "All the news that's fit to +."

There is no requirement to use a "+" in your tagline. I promise.

Once you have a tagline and an avatar, Google+ recommends you send out a post and share the arrival of your new brand. You can do that immediately or you can take some time to build out the look of your page.

managing your page

If you choose to work on your page, you can add a few things to it. If you just posted a URL to your website, you can also add a phone number, email and physical address if that's something you think is important. Be sure to verify the email you share on the page. (A little verification link will pop up minutes after you save your changes.) This is just a step you can take to prove to Google that you really do represent the brand. You can also add photos and additional links that help your Google+ consumer learn more about you.

Once you post, you need to revisit your page and hit refresh to make sure you see any new reactions. I'm often adding my personal Google+ profile in the posts so readers know they can also respond to me. I hope that will help keep me up to date with the responses to the content I post on our brand page.

Here are some of the lessons I've learned after working inside the Google+ brand pages for a while:

  1. Your brand must get circled before you can add anyone into your brand's circles. This helps prevent spam inside Google+, but it also makes it a lot harder to keep track of how and who to circle. Adding people into your circles is a slow and manual process. The +KOMU 8 News page is focused on our regional market of mid-Missouri, but our Google+ audience extends around the world. I've created circles for regions in my market and beyond to help me track what people are saying. I haven't been able to keep up with our 6,500-plus circlers because Google continues to restrict the number of people I can put into circles. Hopefully, that process will change soon. I am committed to adding people into our circles so I can listen and learn from the many people who are talking inside this space.


    Time magazine is trying an idea I tested out the first time my newsroom was inside Google+. The Time page has asked its consumers to tell them what topic circles they'd like to be in. The question was so successful, they had to ask it a second time because the brand had reached its 500-comment limit. Each person who pitches a topic circle has to be manually added into the brand's circle. Hopefully, someday Google will make it possible for brands to create public circles and allow anyone to put themselves inside.

  2. You don't get alerts when your brand is mentioned or added into a circle. I rely on those alerts with my personal profile. My only workaround on this is by searching my brand in the Google+ search bar. I don't know if it shows everything that is said about my brand, but it gives me a chance to comment and +1 content that includes my brand.
  3. Hashtags work. This is another way that's worth trying to keep up with the way people want to engage with my brand. My newsroom tested out an idea where we asked our G+ readers how they heard the national Emergency Alert System by adding a #KOMUalert hashtag. We didn't hear from a lot of people, but it was clearly a quick and easy way to track a topic. It can't hurt to share hashtags on your brand and see if others will use them.
  4. Take advantage of sharing circles. One of the best ways to make sure your brand is included in a collection of recommended media brand pages is to build one of your own, and contact and share your newly created page with people you know who are active on Google+. Promote the heck out of your page so everyone knows it exists. Of course, once you promote it, make sure you follow through and add content there!

Here is a list Google created of the differences between a Google+ profile and a brand page.

Our newsroom's page is asking for input at every turn as we build the page. Google+ gives you the opportunity to share extended content, links, images and video. Try it all out, and get opinions from the people who have circled you. Our newsroom is also using Google Hangouts every Monday through Friday as part of a nontraditional social media-based newscast called U_News@4. I was impressed to see ABC's "Good Morning America" test out the idea of using Hangouts on its show and spent a good chunk of time on it during one morning broadcast this week. CNN and Fox have also found opportunities to use Hangouts in recent months. Let's keep this going! Get creative and see if Google+ offers new ways to reach media consumers and beyond.

Jen Lee Reeves worked in television news for the majority of her career. In the last six years, she has moved from traditional journalist to nontraditional thinker about journalism and education. Jen is currently the interactive director at KOMU-TV and komu.com. At the same time, she is an associate professor at the Missouri School of Journalism and was a part of the inaugural class of Reynolds Journalism Institute fellows (2008-09).

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November 12 2011

19:45

Google purchased Katango to automate Google+ circles

eWeek provides with some insights into why Google has purchased Katango.

eWeek :: Google said it has purchased Katango, whose social software algorithms the search engine provider will likely use to automate the population of Google+ Circles. With over 40 million users and counting since June 28, Google+ is humming along. Google will use Katango's software to improve its Circles social construct, which allows users to follow anyone on the network and partition clusters of users. 

Continue to read Clint Boulton, www.eweek.com

September 19 2011

21:30

Google+: Social Media Upstart 'Worse Than a Ghost Town'

I wanted to log on to Google+. I swear I did. But the thought of it made me tired.

I recently wrote a piece for MediaShift on the perils of tweeting interview requests. Like I've done for past pieces and many of the posts on my blog College Media Matters, I carried out all the expected social media promotion.

I retweeted the MediaShift tweet that announced the piece's premiere on the site. I posted the link on my Facebook profile page as a status update. I dropped it onto Digg and recommended it on StumbleUpon. I placed a chunk of it on my blog with a referral link. I responded to some comments. I even emailed a few friends and colleagues with a heads-up and accompanying bitly link. And then there was G+.

A few hours after the post went up, I received an email confirming MediaShift executive editor Mark Glaser had hyped the piece in a note on Google+. Moments later, someone responded to it. It was a great motivation to respond or post something on there myself.

An Internal Enough-is-Enough Battle

But then something funny happened. I sighed out loud. I got the dreary feeling that often comes midday when my body begs for a catnap. I simply couldn't bring myself to sign on to the service. I let it go, shrugging, thinking I'd get to it later. But I never followed up.

On one level, the response continues to strike me as silly. I'm sure the promo-post would have taken a moment or two tops. And I have nothing against G+. On the contrary, I signed up like every other wannabe tech geek when Google first rolled it out.

I played with the whole Circles thing. I invited a few family members, colleagues, and even students -- something I've avoided on Facebook. I created a profile I must now have floating in cyberspace in at least a dozen slightly different iterations. And I have been on the service here and there, mostly just to see what's what.

But as much as I want to really dive into Google+, I admit I am fighting an internal enough-is-enough battle. As Glaser mentioned on a recent Mediatwits podcast, "There are a few things that are slightly better [than Facebook and other existing social media platforms], but what's really making a huge difference? You know, that's the problem. There's nothing really groundbreaking."

A Social Media Step Too Far?

In that respect, is it possible that G+, at the moment, is simply a social media step too far? Are there only so many daily destination-and-connection sites a person can invest time and effort overseeing?

As Forbes.com contributor Paul Tassi wrote last month within a column doubling as a eulogy for the service, "The fact is, very few people have room to manage many multiple social networks ... since there is only so much time in the day to waste on the Internet. Add in Google+, effectively a duplicate of Facebook, and there just isn't space for it."

I am writing to second Tassi's declaration: Google+ is dead. At worst, in the coming months, it will literally fade away to nothing or exist as Internet plankton. At best, it will be to social networking what Microsoft's Bing is to online search: perfectly adequate; fun to stumble onto once in awhile; and completely irrelevant to the mainstream web.

To be clear, I do not buy the beta argument anymore. G+ still being in beta is like Broadway's "Spiderman: Turn Off the Dark" still being in previews. It has premiered. Months have passed. Audiences have tried it. Critics have weighed in. It is a show -- just not a very entertaining one.

Worse Than a Ghost Town

As it stands, my Circles are sparse. The stream of updates has basically run dry -- reduced to one buddy who regularly writes. My initial excitement about signing on and inviting people to join me has waned. Nowadays, I apparently get tired just thinking about it.

Take my recent MediaShift piece. Less than a week after its posting, more than 300 tweets and retweets linked to it. Between my blog teaser and its MediaShift placement, it got hyped on Facebook by dozens of users. Close to 50 people StumbledUpon it on my blog. On Google+, meanwhile, it was mentioned five times.

Omaha World-Herald columnist Rainbow Russell says it best, noting, "It's a not-vicious-enough-to-be-interesting circle: Nobody posts on Google+ because nobody posts on Google+. My Google+ home page is worse than a ghost town. It doesn't even feel haunted."

Dan Reimold is an assistant professor of journalism at the University of Tampa. He writes and presents frequently on the campus press and maintains the student journalism industry blog College Media Matters, affiliated with the Associated Collegiate Press. His first book, Sex and the University: Celebrity, Controversy, and a Student Journalism Revolution, was published in fall 2010 by Rutgers University Press.

This is a summary. Visit our site for the full post ».

September 18 2011

21:25

ManageFilter users: Google+ losing momentum? Public posts decrease by 41% over past two months

ManageFilter is a Twitter account management tool which links Google+ to your Twitter account. 89n writes that 7,280 people have currently linked their Google+ accounts to Twitter using their service (see source below). I doubt if the usage data of 7,280 can be used to predict how 28 million Google+ users behave.

ManageFlitter :: Kevin Garber, CEO/Co-founder 89n, asks: "Is Google+ losing its momentum?" - The findings: ManageFilter data indicates that the average number of public Google+ posts per day has decreased from 0.68 public posts per day between 19 July 2011 and 19 August 2011 to 0.40 public posts per day between 19 August 2011 and 14 September 2011. This represents a decrease of 41%.

Continue to read Kevin Garber, 89n.com

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