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August 24 2012

18:47

charity: water September Campaign for Rwanda

This September, charity: water is celebrating its birthday by bringing water to everyone in one country–Rwanda. The Rwandan people overcame the darkest time in their history, and together, rebuilt their nation. Now, they’re working to give clean water to everyone. Help charity: water raise $1.7 million to give clean water to every community in the Shyorongi and Ngoma sectors of Rwanda.

The people of Rwanda are rewriting their story. And it starts with clean water for everyone. Learn more and donate at www.charitywater.org/september/.

Also, check out 5 Questions with Scott Harrison, Founder of charity: water on the Official YouTube Blog.

Smile at the Man Who Did This To You

Jonathon Torgovnik and Jules Shell co-founded Foundation Rwanda, an organization that brings support to woman who bore children as a result of rape during the 1994 genocide and their children.

Watch Jules Shell at TEDxScottAFB tell the remarkable stories of Annet and Agathe in Rwanda.

Learn more about Foundation Rwanda.

Intended Consequences

In 2008 MediaStorm produced Intended Consequences with photojournalist Jonathan Torgovnik on the plight and strength of women who bore children as a result of rape during the 1994 Rwandan Genocide.

In Rwanda, in 1994, Hutu militia committed a bloody genocide, murdering one million Tutsis. Many of the Tutsi women were spared, only to be held captive and repeatedly raped. Many became pregnant. Intended Consequences tells their stories. See the project at http://mediastorm.com/publication/intended-consequences

Learn more about Foundation Rwanda.

Go to charity: water’s September Campaign on Rwanda.

January 14 2010

18:00

Intended Consequences named as first web winner of Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards

Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism today announced the 2010 winners of the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards. MediaStorm is honored to be the first web recipient of a duPont Award, for Intended Consequences, by Jonathan Torgovnik.

From their site:

In painfully intimate interviews photojournalist Jonathan Torgovnik explores an unfathomable question: can a mother can love a child born out of rape. The women profiled in this haunting multimedia presentation were caught in the 1994 Rwandan genocide, when mass rapes resulted in the birth of an estimated 20,000 children. It spotlights an issue which had not been as widely covered as other war crimes in Rwanda, and is the first Web-based production to win a duPont Award. The women speak simply about their brutal experiences, their isolation and suffering, and the way forward. The producers made excellent creative choices that contributed to the impact of the reporting without resorting to sensationalism.

The duPont Awards, administered since 1968 by Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, are considered to be the most prestigious broadcast journalism awards and the equivalent of the Pulitzer Prizes, which are also administered at the Journalism School. Selected by the duPont Jury for excellence in broadcast journalism, the award-winning news programs aired in the United States between July 1, 2008 and June 30, 2009. The honorees will be presented with silver duPont batons at a ceremony held at Columbia University on Thursday, January 21, 2010.

Congratulations to all of the winners, there’s some really amazing work in there. You can see the full list at the duPont site.

17:17

Intended Consequences wins Anthropographia Award for Multimedia and Human Rights

We are pleased to announce that Intended Consequences by Jonathan Torgovnik has won The Anthropographia Award for Multimedia and Human Rights. Congratulations also to Marcus Bleasdale, whose still project The Rape of a Nation won the The Anthropographia Award for Photography and Human Rights. The multimedia piece, produced by MediaStorm, also received an Honorary Mention.

Anthropographia’s aim is to create new spaces for photojournalism; new spaces that encourage the promotion of human rights, expose social injustice and underline the multiple realities of our current world. The jury shortlisted 24 photography essays as well as 10 multimedia pieces which will be displayed on large scale exhibitions internationally.

Projects will be screened at the New York Photo Festival, and at several other locations. Full listing, along with all of the winners, on the Anthropographia site.

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