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December 28 2011

11:41

Consumer Attitudes for Windows Phone is "Positive," NPD's Ross Rubin

Although Windows phones have a small position in the U.S. marketplace, consumers are positively inclined to give device it a try, says Ross Rubin, Executive Director and Principal Analyst, Connected Intelligence at NPD Group.

Rubin says the initial opportunity for Microsoft is budget-conscious consumer who are not users of the iPhone or the Android system.  He calls the new OS "approachable and consisitent" and says users will find it familiar, given its likeness to the Windows desktop OS.

He says that while Microsoft has been late to the smart phone game, it has been successful in attracting developers and is committing big resources to the platform.  For the software giant, "failure is not an option," he says.

Rubin was interviewed in this segment by by CNET's Maggie Reardon at a 2-hour Webcast produced at the Livestream studios in Manhattan.

Andy Plesser

 

 

 

October 09 2011

17:07

How mobile phones could bring public services to people in developing countries

PBS MediaShift :: In Santiago, Chile, more than 60% of the poorest citizens don't have access to the Internet. In the rest of the country, that number increases to 80%, and in rural areas, an Internet connection is almost nonexistent. But there are more than 20 million mobile phones in the nation,that's actually around 1.15 cell phones per capita in a nation of 17,094,270 people. And in rural areas, cell phones are king.

Miguel Paz: What if governments of underdeveloped countries create and provide easy ways to access public information and services on mobile phones with an application or open-source web app that could be downloaded from government websites?

Miguel Paz, Continue to read www.pbs.org

October 06 2011

12:20

How Mobile Phones Could Bring Public Services to People in Developing Countries

In Santiago, Chile, more than 60 percent of the poorest citizens don't have access to the Internet. In the rest of the country, that number increases to 80 percent, and in rural areas, an Internet connection is almost nonexistent. But there are more than 20 million mobile phones in the nation, according to the latest survey by the Undersecretary of Telecommunications. (That's actually around 1.15 cell phones per capita in a nation of 17,094,270 people.) And in rural areas, cell phones are king.

santiago.jpg

As Knight News Challenge winners FrontlineSMS, Ushahidi and NextDrop have shown, mobile communications are crucial for citizens living in rural areas, where being able to reach other people and access relevant news and public services information make a huge improvement in people's lives. Plus, cell phones are tools that most already have.

THE PITCH

What if, apart from efforts to widen connectivity in isolated areas and government programs to provide computers for schools in rural areas (which has been a very good, but slow, undertaking, and not an attractive business for telecom companies), governments of underdeveloped countries create and provide easy ways to access public information and services on mobile phones with an application or open-source web app that could be downloaded from government websites (in Chile it's Gob.cl)? Or cellular service providers could pre-install an app or direct access to a web app on every smartphone or other devices?

This could mean a great deal for people, particularly in rural and impoverished areas where the biggest news is not what's happening in Congress or the presidential palace, but what is happening to you and your community (something Facebook understood very well in its latest change that challenges the notion of what is newsworthy -- but that's a topic for a separate post).

People could do things like schedule a doctor's appointment or receive notice that a doctor won't be available; find out about grants to improve water conditions in their sector; receive direct information about training programs for growing organic food and the market prices for products they might sell; find out how their kids are doing in a school they attend in the city or if the rural bus system will go this week to the nearest town or not. These are just a few very straightforward examples of useful public services information that could be available on people's phones. Such availability of information could save time and money for those who lack both things.

I know it because I saw it as a boy growing up in a small town -- and as the son of a farmer who still hasn't gotten around to the idea of using a computer, despite having the chance to use one. But because my father owns a mobile phone, he's become an expert user of SMS and applications that allow him to check weather conditions.

WHAT'S IN IT FOR THE TELECOM COMPANIES

At the same time, telecom companies could support this initiative by providing mobile Internet connection packages and a free SMS service for rural areas by which citizens could specify their information searches or requests (a kind of help desk). Why would they do it for free? Because with each free transaction, there might be another one that has nothing to do with the government or public services information, which may produce additional income. It might also improve the companies' public image.

Another way of getting support from these companies consists of giving them a
tax reduction for providing the service and automatic updates of information. Thus, rural citizens living in small towns and cities would be able to access the data they need (pension reforms, hospital appointments, housing benefits, food grants, etc).

IN SIMPLE WORDS

To do what we're talking about, we need clean and intuitive interfaces with super-simple steps and strong government websites or apps that learn from the end users' needs, systematizing:

  • Databases containing questions and answers made by ministries and government staff.
  • Services citizens can access in order to ask for all kinds of information: subsidies, hours of service, etc.
  • Simple and complex procedures, so that answers can be delivered accurately and in the shortest amount of time.

This reduces the margin of error, maximizes human resources -- decreasing the man-hours needed for searching for requested information -- allows specific departments to detect questions which are more usual, and meets the needs of users and citizens.

However, in order to make citizens understand the information, it has to be written in a simple way, with no illegible technical or legal terms. For such a purpose, there are citizen language manuals that standardize response criteria issued by the state. (A good example of this in Spanish is the Mexican Lenguaje Ciudadano government guide.)

This is a small civic proposal to start a wider conversation and brainstorming and discover projects and ideas that may already be addressing this issue. Please feel free to post your tips and thoughts in the comments section.

Image of Santiago, Chile by Flickr user Cleanie.

March 06 2011

16:37

Digital Media Milestone: News Consumption via Mobile Reaches Nearly Half for Financial Times

The introduction of tablets and smart phones has driven extraordinary growth in digital news consumption.  According to Robert Grimshaw, Managing Director of the the FT.com, approximately forty-five percent of digital news is now consumed via mobile devices.

Coupled with the growth in consumption, has been the interest in advertisers around advertising on the mobile platforms, which was nearly non-existant just one year ago, he said in this interview with Beet.TV

We spoke with Grimshaw in Manhattan on Thursday at the paidContent2011 conference where he was a panelist.

He speaks to the success of the online subscription for the Financial Times, which is now at around 200,000, has reached half of the worldwide print circulation of 400,000.  He said that growth of digital subscriptions has risen by fifty percent in 2010.

He also speaks about the profitability of the the paper's online video efforts.

Grimshaw: Apple is Giving us a "Headache" 

More conversations with Grimshaw in this video interview conducted by paidContentUK editor Robert Andrews. Grimshaw comments on the recently introduced policies by Apple around payment for content on the iPad.  

Andy Plesser

December 21 2010

03:33

The 'Mobisode' Returns: MTV Planning Original Video Programming for Mobile Devices

NEW YORK -- The proliferation of smart wireless devices is creating a need for original content and MTV will be producing original entertainment for the emerging medium says Dermot McCormack, EVP for Digital at MTV Networks in this interview with Beet.TV

McCormack didn't provide specifics but says that MTV will repurpose existing video and create new content in 2011.

Heraled as new form of entertainment for mobile devices back in 2007, Mobisodes as an medium never had much traction.  With a slew of high powered smart phones and tablets, and faster connectivity, mobisodes may be back to stay.

Andy Plesser

 

November 09 2010

15:00

Overcoming the Challenges of Using Ushahidi in Low Bandwidth Areas

With the increased adoption of Ushahidi around the world, we are finding that one problem (which we anticipated in the very beginning of the initiative) is that of low bandwidth regions. In the early days of testing the platform in Kenya, we found that the map would take ages to load, and so the development team worked very hard to change this. This was of course before the installation of fiber optic links in Kenya, which make connection speeds much better after September 2009.

Our current solution for integrating SMS in areas with low bandwidth (but good wireless service coverage) is to have a FrontlineSMS hub with a compatible mobile phone attached to a computer via USB or even Bluetooth for those who prefer it.

Ushahidi plus FrontlineSMS

That has worked reasonably well, but we are always looking for ways to improve access to maps containing crowdsourced information, particularly in areas with low Internet penetration rates. Recent statistics indicate that mobile networks are now available to 90 percent of the world's population overall, and to 80 percent of the people living in rural areas. This means it's even more important for Ushahidi to be able to collect and then visualize information from mobile phones. It's worth remembering that for many people with mobile phones, their first social network is their address book.

What follows below are several updates on developments to improve the ability for people to use Ushahidi in low bandwidth areas. We welcome everyone in our greater community to try these applications out and provide us with feedback. Let's see if we can continue this process of "real-time sense making," even in rural areas. At the very least, we would like to have the tools well tested and used in various locales.

Luanda

We have an upcoming version of Ushahidi dubbed "Luanda" that will be released soon, it will have many improvements that will be of interest to deployers around the world.

There are two options for using Ushahidi in low bandwidth regions:

1. Configuring the mobile version of the site you build and put Ushahidi on. You will need the 2.0 build of the platform (caveat that it's a test build). Then add and activate the mobile plug-in from our plug-ins database.

2. The offline mapping tab available as an OS X test build - Dale Zak and Emmanuel Kala are still working on this, but we'd like to invite users to test things out. Caveat is it's a test build and for Mac OS X for now.

Please submit issues/suggestions on the Github tracking issue tracking log, as this will help us greatly.

Frontline Mapping

The upcoming Frontline Mapping plug-in allows new ways for Ushahidi incident reports to be gathered in the field:

  • SMS-to-Report -- Any incoming text message can be converted into an incident report and synced once Internet access becomes available. For example, a text message that reads "Riots in the streets, several people injured" would be received by Frontline. A person managing the application double-clicks that message and the new incident report dialog is pre-populated with that information, along with the sender's contact info if available.
  • FrontlineForms-to-Report -- The Mapping plug-in can generate a FrontlineForm with all the required Ushahidi fields, and send that Form to any contact with a Java-enabled phone. The incoming FrontlineForm response is automatically covered to an incident report, and can be synced once the Internet becomes available.
  • FrontlineSurveys-to-Report -- The Mapping plug-in can also populate the new FrontlineSurveys plug-in with Ushahidi-specific questions (such as, "What is the incident description?") You can send a survey to any contact via SMS, which initializes a series of questions, the next question sent once the previous answer is received.

Here are four demo videos showing the Mapping Plug-in in action:

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9326/FrontlineSMS-Mapping-One.swf

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9326/FrontlineSMS-Mapping-Two.swf

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9326/FrontlineSMS-Mapping-Three.swf

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9326/FrontlineSMS-Mapping-Four.swf

Note that the FrontlineForms and FrontlineSurveys options require less work for administrators because the data received is structured; however it may require multiple SMS messages to gather all the information. In times of crisis, the user may only be able to send one text message. However, community health care workers may choose to use the FrontlineForms or FrontlineSurveys options to submit structured patient information.

Do subscribe to our blog feed or follow us on Twitter to get the latest about upcoming announcements about the continuing evolution of the platform.

October 26 2010

15:28

Accel Partner's Ping Li: Biggest Video Opportunity is Around Mobile

Ping Li, a partner at powerhouse venture capital firm Accel Partners (investor in Facebook, others), says the big opportunity around video is mobile. 

He says the iPad will lead to the emergence of new sorts of video programming from the device's "use case."

While he is bullish on innovation around mobile, the one video sector he is bearish on is connected TV devices.

Accel is an investor in several online video-related companies including Brightcove, YuMe and comScore.

This segment is from the Beet.TV Online Video Roundtable held in June in the New York headquarters of MSNBC.com.   Moderating this section of the conversation is Peter Kafka, of All Things Digital MediaMemo.  The event was sponsored by YuMe.

You watch the conference right here.  This video session on Livestream has had nearly 400,000 viewer minutes since it went on demand on Livestream on June 22.  It is by far our most widely viewed live event.

Andy Plesser 

October 05 2010

17:06

Android's Massive Success Due to Verizon, NPD's Ross Rubin

Today's news from Nielsen about the fast growth of Android to become the most popular mobile operating system in the U.S. owes much of its success to the support of Verizon Wireless, says Ross Rubin, lead technology analayst at the NPD Group.

Rubin says that Verizon's predominent installed base and price support for the sophisticated device are the key factors in its success.

This is one of three video segments we produced from out conversation.

Andy Plesser

August 06 2010

13:57

Are Android phones the best option for journalism students?

A few months ago I was asked what sort of mobile phone I would recommend for a journalism student. Knowing how tight student budgets are, and that any choice should have as much of an eye on the future as on the present, I recommended getting an Android phone.

The reasoning went like this: iPhones are great at certain things, and currently benefit from a wider range of applications than other mobile phones. But the contracts are expensive, the battery life poor, and Apple’s closed system problematic, for reasons I’ll expand on in a moment.

Currently, BlackBerry smartphones (apparently you can’t say ‘BlackBerries’) and high-end Nokias are probably the most popular phones for journalists. Both have excellent battery life and BlackBerry smartphones (yes, it gets annoying after the first time) have a particular strength in the way their email works.

But these are also expensive, and Symbian (the operating system for most high end Nokias) does not have a long term future, while its replacement, Maemo, has yet to build a present.

Which brings us to Android – the ‘Google’ phone – and the most affordable option for the student journalist looking at a multiplatform future.

  • With Google behind the technology, Android phones have excellent email integration – not quite as strong as a BlackBerry, but more than good enough.
  • Android’s app store – the ‘Market‘ – competes with Apple’s – and is catching up fast. Most of the must-have apps for journalists are already in there, and on this score it’s much stronger than BlackBerry or Nokia.
  • The biggest weakness is Android’s battery life, which is around the same as the iPhone (some tips on that here).
  • But apart from their affordability it is the openness of the Android platform which presents the strongest case for being the student journalist’s mobile of choice.

When I advised that student to get an Android phone, it was because I think that Android will seriously challenge iPhone both in terms of userbase (which is already happening) and app development.

Computerworld’s Jonny Evans (an “Apple Holic”) compares the situation to the struggle for the PC:

“[Apple's] insistence on a closed system means partnership deals aren’t open to it in the hardware space.

“So, where Android can deliver multiple devices for multiple niches at multiple price points to the market, Apple delivers a limited number of devices, hoping the quality of its software will make a difference. It seems to attract customers that way.

“As fellow blogger, Sharon Machlis, noted last week, the result of that strategy during the PC wars enabled Microsoft to seize monopoly-level market share on the desktop.

The game’s not over.

The same post, however, notes that “Apple’s key advantage against Android is its developer community”:

“Despite criticism of the way it curates its store, Apple does have an App Store that works, where 95 percent of apps are approved fast.

“This means developers already have a reliable and profitable route to market at 100 million iOS users – set to climb with the addition of at least 24 million more iPhone 4 users this year.

“Android developers may be able to develop more openly, but development is fragmented by the need to develop for multiple devices.”

Apple alienated parts of their community earlier this year when they released a new developer agreement. Then, a couple of weeks ago, Google provided a platform for a whole new community when it announced the launch of a tool that can only challenge Apple’s dominance: the App Inventor for Android:

“To use App Inventor, you do not need to be a developer. App Inventor requires NO programming knowledge. This is because instead of writing code, you visually design the way the app looks and use blocks to specify the app’s behavior.”

For the student journalist, this tool also offers an opportunity to experiment with mobile journalism and publishing in the same way that Blogger allowed you to experiment with online publishing and distribution, or Yahoo! Pipes allowed you to play with mashups (TechCrunch’s MG Siegler compares it with GeoCities). Tony Hirst has already written a series of posts exploring how the tool works (it’s currently in invite-only beta), which are worth bookmarking.

This tool seals the deal for me – it’s the difference between doing the job now and redefining it for the future.

But what do you think? What features do Android phones lack? What advantages do other phones hold?

For the record, I use an iPhone and an old N95. I use the N95 for phonecalls, texts and streaming video (because of its long battery life) and the iPhone for web browsing and apps – particularly RSS readers, Audioboo, editing blog posts and checking comments, Twitter, and email. Each handset is with a different operator, which gives me better 3G coverage options too. I also pay for an Android phone (a HTC Magic) in my household.


10:44

Seattle's Mobile App Builder Zumobi Growing Quickly as Publishers Seek Solutions

The landscape for mobile Apps for the iPhone and Android has changed so rapidly that some of the biggest publishers, including msnbc.com, are outsourcing the creation of their Apps to a Seattle-based company called Zumobi.

We spoke with Zumobi co-founder John SanGiovanni recently about  the demand for Apps and his company's services.  Before founding Zumobi, he was Technical Evangelist for Microsoft Research.

Unlike most development shops which charge on a project basis, Zumobi develops its products in a sort of partnership, a rev share scenario, with its customers.

Zumobi created the Meet the Press App recently for msnbc.com as well as other msnbc.com shows including the Today Show.

SanGiovanni says that demand for video Apps are booming. 

Andy Plesser

July 19 2010

17:16

South African Paper Uses Mobile Services to Engage Readers


In Grahamstown, South Africa, getting and sharing news is a mobile experience. Grocott's Mail, a local paper, incorporates mobile phones into many aspects of its news service -- from disseminating headlines via SMS, to encouraging readers to text in their opinions and making it a part of a Knight News Challenge-winning citizen journalist training program.

The paper, which sells 6,400 copies each week, is a good example of how mobiles can create a richer news experience for both readers and publishers. Idea Lab contributor Harry Dugmore, is a professor at the School of Journalism and Media Studies at Rhodes University. He runs the Iindaba Ziyafika citizen journalism program with Grocott's Mail.

"The inspiration for the whole project is trying to democratize news and information and put it into the hands of more people, give people more access to it, and create more participation -- not just one-way, top-down communication," he said.

Creating Reader Engagement

Grocott's Mail, which published its first print edition in 1870, launched an online version of the paper in 2006. The website, now called Grocott's Mail Online, uses a customized content management system called Nika that is built on Drupal and allows for a smooth computer-to-mobile transition.

Grocott's Mail Online has a page for SMS opinions from readers in addition to the normal editorial content; readers can text the paper with their responses to articles, tips for stories, or general information and see those texts translated into non-text speak and put online or in the paper. Nika sorts SMSs and incorporates them directly into the newspaper's system, automating what had previously been a manual process. The SMS pages let local citizens share their opinions, and see their words in print.

Another way in which local citizens are engaged is through the paper's citizen journalist training program. However, Dugmore is quick to differentiate the citizen journalists from the general online community saying, "We think journalism and citizen journalism is quite a special thing, and we make quite an effort to distinguish it from user generated content and from community participation."

The six-week training program teaches students how to frame a story, how to create a narrative, how to access sources, and how to interview them. (Read more about it by going back through Dugmore's posts here.) So far, the course has been taught four time and, according to Dugmore, the program has evolved to be an important part of the paper. "We've gone from getting two pieces of citizen journalism a month to one for almost every issue," he said.

The citizen journalists use mobile phones as a supplementary tool in their work, not as a substitute for old-fashioned journalism techniques. Dugmore explained that although the students use their mobiles for sharing breaking SMS news alerts and taking photographs, they've often found it easier to take notes with a paper and pencil and then write out the stories on Grocott's Mail's computers. However, he said that they still train the citizen journalists on using the phones as cameras and for audio recording, and that the use of mobile phones is part of the curriculum.

Getting The Word Out

For readers who want to stay up to date on the latest headlines, Grocott's Mail has an SMS headline alert system. The free program, which users text to sign up for, sends out the paper's top headlines twice a week. (The print edition comes out every Tuesday and Friday, as do the SMS headline alerts.) The program launched a few months ago, and Dugmore said there are several hundred subscribers so far.

In addition to SMS alerts, the paper is also developing another way to reach its readers -- using mobile instant messaging to directly send the news to their subscribers. Dugmore said this will be a good addition to the current SMS headline system because it will give subscribers a more thorough news experience, while being a cost-effective news dissemination tool for the paper (which covers the cost of the SMSs).

"The other nice thing about IM is that you're not restricted, like SMS, to just headlines," he said. "If you want to, you can send a whole IM or the whole story "

The paper has already developed a GoogleTalk version of the instant messaging system and is currently finalizing a MXit version; they plan to launch the tool by the end of the summer, meaning that users without high-end phones can still have what Dugmore calls a "smartphone experience."

Grocott's Mail's initiatives show how mobile phones can be a great way to keep readers engaged.

"We were looking for ways to create more spaces where people could get news and information about things that were useful, and [also] looking for ways that possibly people could come together to see if there were common issues or areas where they might be able to make a difference in their own lives," Dugmore said.

June 07 2010

02:34

Meet Verizon Wireless Spokesperson John Johnson, A Viral Video Sensation with 500K Views

With half a million views in four days, John H. Johnson, a communications exec. for Verizon Wireless has become a Web video celeb for uttering these 10 words on camera: Verizon has "no plans to carry the iPhone in the immediate future."

By chance, I ran into John on Tuesday afternoon at the opening of the Wall Street Journal's All Things Digital conference at the Terranea resort near LA.

I had interviewed him at last year's D and figured we should sit down for a follow-up. 

I asked him about the much speculated support of Apple devices by Verizon and he offered a definitive response, the first time the company had commented on the record on the subject.  

Later that night on stage, Apple CEO Steve Jobs declined to comment on potential new carriers for the Apple iPad or iPhone in the U.S., beyond AT&T. 

For weeks,  many industry observers have speculated that Apple would announce Verizon support for a new generation iPhone at tomorrow's big developer conference.

The timing of my little scoop was perfect.

I published the four-minute video on Beet.TV on Wednesday at about 7:30 p.m. Eastern time.  Almost immediately it went up on Techmeme and it took off from there.

Many sites and blogs linked to the story and used the embed including the Huffington Post, CNET, Silicon Alley Insider, the Examiner, Gizmodo, MacRumors, 9-5 Mac, Venture Beat, The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle and hundreds of mentions on Facebook and Twitter. 

For little Beet.TV, this is by far our biggest hit. 

As of  Sunday night at 10:00, we have had over 500,000 video views served by Blip.tv, our primary service provider.  Most of our 1900 videos get under 1,000 views.  We've had a few hits, but nothing of this magnitude.  It's been thrilling watching the numbers continue to rise.

We are proud of this scoop.  It was good luck to connect with John by chance.  And, i was extremely fortunate to be on the scene, to have press credentials to cover this extraordinary event.  So many great interviews from the the conference published and many more to come.

Production Note: I shot the interview on my $650 Canon Vixia and sent the tape via UPS overnight to my editor Joe Bonacci in our New York newsroom.  He edited on FinalCut and put the video up on Blip.tv.  Nice bonus for our current sponsor YuMe whose in-stream ads travel with the embedded video.

Please see the tally of views on the Blip.tv dashboard pasted below.  This from 6/6 at 10:00 ET:

Verizon.blip

Andy Plesser, Managing Editor 

May 07 2010

13:04

Canada's mDialog Has Ad Insertion Platform for iPad

With more than 1 million iPads now in consumers' hands, a number of publishers are looking to serve up ads across those tablets and other mobile devices which are not in the Flash ecosystem, the standard for most video advertising.

That includes mobile technology platform mDialog, which recently introduced real-time, dynamic ad insertion tools on mobile devices. To explain, we spoke with Greg Philpott, the company's founder and president in Las Vegas at the recent National Association of Broadcasters show.

Toronto-based mDialog falls squarely on the Apple side of the house in the hot-button topic of Flash-vs-HTML 5 as mDialog exclusively focuses on serving ads into non-Flash based devices, Philpott explained. "We provide a publisher ways to monetize through dynamic ad insertion. We figure out the right ad to insert into the right market at the right time," he said.

That can lead to higher CPMs and CPCs, which makes ad partners happy, he explained. mDialog customers include Pearson Publishing and Discovery Canada.

Daisy Whitney, Senior Producer

April 16 2010

22:42

What Do You Think of Ads on Your Mobile Phone?

There are two converging trends: 1) people are tired of seeing advertising everywhere, and 2) cell phones are becoming an entry place to the mobile web, meaning more ads are coming. Yet, even as our smartphones give us more features, we'd prefer to have no ads and not have to pay for apps. At some point, we might have to make the trade-off of seeing more ads on our mobile phones in exchange for free features and add-ons. And now that Apple announced its new iAds initiative to serve ads into apps on iPhones and iPads, we know the bombardment of ads is coming. So what do you think? Are mobile ads a necessary evil or something we can live without or something that's welcome when relevant? Answer the poll below or give us a more detailed answer in comments.




What do you think about ads on your mobile phone?online surveys

This is a summary. Visit our site for the full post ».

April 09 2010

23:05

4-Minute Roundup: Apple's iAds; Journo-Programming Degree

Here's the latest 4MR audio report from MediaShift. In this week's edition, I look at Apple's plan to enter mobile advertising with its new iAd platform. Apple has been known for hardware and software but has never handled ad sales before, and now finds itself squarely in competition with Google and AdMob in that arena. Plus, Columbia University announced a new dual journalism-programming degree. And I ask Just One Question to AdAge reporter Kunur Patel about her take on the new Apple iAd platform.

Check it out:

4mrbareaudio4910.mp3

>>> Subscribe to 4MR <<<

>>> Subscribe to 4MR via iTunes <<<

Listen to my entire interview with Kunur Patel:

patel full.mp3

Background music is "What the World Needs" by the The Ukelele Hipster Kings via PodSafe Music Network.

Here are some links to related sites and stories mentioned in the podcast:

Apple Launches 'iAd,' Mobile Ad Platform for iPhone and iPad at ClickZ

Steve Jobs Promises Developers That Apple's iAds Won't 'Suck' and Will Make Them Money at MediaMemo

Apple's iAd Not Game-Changing, but Will Move Market at AdAge

Apple Unveils New Ad Software for iPhone at Wall Street Journal

Apple Announces Mobile Ad Plans Thursday, and Google Can't Wait to Tell the FTC at MediaMemo

Apple unveils iPhone OS 4.0 at CNET

Apple Unveils Ad Platform and Phone Software at NY Times Bits

Will Columbia-Trained, Code-Savvy Journalists Bridge the Media/Tech Divide? at Wired Epicenter

Columbia's J-School Gears Up A New Generation Of Digital Media Geeks at Business Insider

Columbia Rolls Out Joint Journalism - CompSci Grad Program at FishbowlNY

New dual-degree master's in journalism & computer science announced at Columbia University

Also, be sure to vote in our poll about what you think about ads on your mobile phone:




What do you think about ads on your mobile phone?surveys

Mark Glaser is executive editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He also writes the bi-weekly OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. He lives in San Francisco with his son Julian. You can follow him on Twitter @mediatwit.

This is a summary. Visit our site for the full post ».

April 02 2010

12:09

The Financial Times Readies Non-Flash Solution for Apple Mobile Platform

LONDON - The Financial Times, which serves and an increasingly mobile audience, is finalizing efforts around a non-Flash solution to deliver video to Apple and other mobile devices based on H.264, according Stephen Pinches, Lead Product Development Manager for the FT.com.

We caught up with Pinches last month at the Beet.TV Online Video Roundtable where he was a participant.

In this interview, he speaks about the production and monetization strategy around video on the FT.com.

In an e-mail, Pinches tells Beet.TV that an HTML5 solution is in development but that H.264 would be the first implementation in getting videos the iPhone and iPad.

Andy Plesser, Executive Producer

March 31 2010

21:00

Kyte Announces HTML5 Player and Readies SDK for iPhone/iPad

SAN FRANCISCO -- Kyte, the San Francisco-based online video platform that has been a front-runner of video distribution for customers, including MTV to mobile devices, will soon release a software developer kit (SDK) for the iPhone and the iPad.

The Kyte iPhone/iPad SDK enables iPad Application development as an alternative to the playback enablement of video via HTML5.

Last month, we sat down with Kyte COO Gannon Hall to talk about Kyte and how it is positioned in the mobile space.

Here is the company's announcement and more on today's news up on TechCrunch.

Andy Plesser, Executive Producer

March 24 2010

13:45

Fox Readying "Hulu-Like" Mobile Video Site Called Bitbot

Today, Fox is expected to announce a Hulu-like service for mobile devices that will offer a range of content from Fox, NBC Universal, and Discovery, according to a report in GigaOM

The free application comes with sneak previews, and full content will have a $10 a month subscription fee. It is expected to launch "in several weeks."

Last month in San Francisco, we caught up with Gregg Colvin, VP of Business Development for Fox Interactive to speak about syndication strategy for the network.  He said that micropayments and subscriptions around mobile content is a growing business area for the network.

Gregg was a participant in the online video summit.

Andy Plesser, Executive Producer

March 11 2010

13:45

March 09 2010

21:04
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Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl