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July 26 2012

18:19

Social media measurement: where to get started?

So you have a Facebook page, a Twitter profile, a blog, an Instagram stream, and a Pinterest pinboard - but have you ever wondered if all of your fans, followers and re-pinners are actually connecting to your cause? Measuring success in social media is a hotly debated topic within the non-profit technology world and big questions persist:

  • Why measure social media?
  • What are my goals?
  • How do I measure?
  • What tools should I use?


These questions, and others, were explored during July’s Net Tuesday event, Social Media Measurement, presented by Tierney Smith, Community Manager for TechSoup Canada.

Upon introducing herself Tierney was quick to point out that she is not a social media expert and that anyone who proclaims to be one is kidding themselves. Social media is a rapidly evolving field where products, services and users can change in the blink of an eye, making it impossible for anyone to have all the answers when it comes to creating and measuring social media success. With that in mind, Tierney suggested that based on her own experience as well as what she has read, tried and curated, there are a few key questions and takeaways that can help you explore the vast social media landscape and, ideally, contribute to your own success online.

Why measure social media?

For starters, we need to know whether or not all of that time and energy we put into writing blog posts, formulating tweets, sharing links and posting pictures is actually enabling a real connection between our community of supporters and our cause, or if our efforts falling on deaf ears. We also need to prove to others (ahem, our leadership) that social media is in fact, contributing to the achievement of our mission and that it should be continued (i.e. funded).

The challenge, of course, is that, just as every organization’s mission is different from the next, so too are the metrics we attach to social media success. In order to measure social media we must first decide what it is about using social media that uniquely impacts or contributes to our organization’s mission.

For example, Tierney presented a case study from Pathways to Education, an organization that uses social media to engage with its youth constituents in communities across Canada. In the past, employees at Pathways to Education contacted youth via telephone in order to communicate changes to programs or events. Once they began using social media to connect with their youth participants, (a medium on which youth are particularly active) Pathways found that they were saving an incredible amount of manpower per year - the equivalent of two full time employees! This metric is obviously unique to Pathways, but it is a prime example of how social media metrics need to be tailored to each organization.

What are your goals?

Participants at Toronto Net Tuesday

Once you’ve taken a good look at your organization and analyzed how social media fits into the overall picture, it’s important to take a step back and ask, “What are our goals for using social media?” As Tierney suggested, hopefully we are all past the point of engaging with social media just to “have a presence.” In order to measure any kind of success with social media, it’s important to set goals that produce some kind of result. Below are a few examples to get your wheels turning.

Use social media to:

  • promote an event
  • get people to sign a petition
  • get supporters to raise $ for you
  • recruit volunteers
  • build community amongst clients
  • share info on a topic
  • tell stories about your work
  • get feedback from supporters


Once you’ve identified high-level goals you can also create sub-goals. For example, if your high- level goal is to encourage women to share stories and engage with your organization through social media, perhaps your sub goal is to facilitate connections between these women. The important thing is to create some sort of goals - the data you collect won’t mean anything without them.

How do you measure?

How you measure social media can be conveniently split into three main categories:

Exposure: What do supporters SEE? (eg. Facebook page likes, Twitter followers, email subscribers)
Engagement: What do supporters SAY about our cause? (eg. Facebook content likes, Twitter retweets) How do supporters FEEL about our cause? (eg. blog comments, Twitter retweets with comments, Facebook shares with comments)
Conversion: What does this prompt supporters to DO? (eg. donations, advocacy actions, event attendance)

Once you’ve grasped the different ways you can measure social media, pick one your goals for social media and run in through SEE, SAY, FEEL, DO. What do each of these metrics mean to your organization?

What tools should you use?

There are countless tools available for measuring social media - some are expensive and provide an incredible amount of data, some are free and provide only a snapshot of one particular aspect of your social media endeavors. Whichever tool(s) you decide to use, don’t overestimate the power of a simple Excel spreadsheet.

Tierney shared a few of the tools she is currently using. They include:


Of course, there are tons more tools out there - just remember that the key to measurement is consistency, so make it a habit!

For more resources/links/tools, take a look at the second page of the handout.

Happy measuring!

By: Kristen Scott, Toronto Net Tuesday volunteer and Managing Director at the Bhutan Canada Foundation

Presentation:
Social Media Measurement for Nonprofits

Get the handout & related resources

April 30 2012

00:50

NetSquared Camp 2012: The Story

The Net Tuesday Vancouver team got bored.

To keep from getting into trouble with the cops we've had to find ourselves a hobby.

After examining our options (rollerblading! stamp collecting! cricket!) we decided that our new hobby should be hosting unconferences, because what's more fun than gathering 75 of our best friends together to chat about how we can use this new-fangled internet thing to do good in the world?

And so NetSquared Camp 2012 was born!

Click here to read the story.

(Pictures! Videos! Links! Tweets! Gossip!)

 

April 16 2012

22:14

Vodafone Americas Foundation Announces 2012 Wireless Innovation Project Winners

Three Groundbreaking Mobile Innovations Target Critical Issues in Agriculture, Healthcare and Developing Economies

The Vodafone Americas Foundation and mHealth Alliance are pleased to announce the 2012 winners of the Vodafone Americas Foundation Wireless Innovation Project™ and the mHealth Alliance Award, a competition designed to spark innovation and help solve pressing global issues. The winning projects include Wireless Bug Sensor, a wireless sensor that helps farmers “spy” on insects; OScan, an inexpensive and easy-to-use tool for screening oral cancer; and InSight, a simple credit building tool for entrepreneurs in developing countries. Each of these projects leverage the ever-increasing accessibility to wireless technology to solve prevalent social problems. Collectively, the projects will be awarded $650,000 in cash and prizes to further develop their projects for implementation and adoption. The winners will accept their awards at the Global Philanthropy Forum in Washington D.C. on April 17, 2012.

"It’s incredibly energizing to be able recognize these innovative solutions for social good," said June Sugiyama, Director of Vodafone Americas Foundation™. "This is our fourth year of this competition and we continue to identify unique and impactful solutions.”

Introducing the 2012 Wireless Innovation Project Winners:

1st Place, winner of $300,000 – Wireless Bug Sensor, University of California, Riverside
A largely unrecognized barrier that farmers face to crop production is insect infestation, which is particularly difficult for farmers in developing countries due to high costs and limited access to pesticides. The Wireless Bug-Sensor team at UC Riverside in collaboration with ISCA Technologies has created a technology that senses the location, type, and number of harmful insects in the field, alerting the farmer about the type of intervention needed with a once-a-day text message. Inspired by the lasers used in spy movies to listen in on conversations, this wireless technology drastically reduces the costs typically spent by farmers on untargeted, blanket pesticide spraying. Ultimately, this will increase profits for farmers as well as alleviate hunger worldwide. www.cs.ucr.edu/~eamonn/CE/
www.iscatech.com/exec/wire...sensor.htm

2nd Place, winner of $200,000, and mHealth Alliance winner of $50,000 in strategic and networking support – OScan, Stanford University
70% of the world's tobacco consumption comes from developing countries and is sharply rising, leading to a large number of deadly diseases, including oral cancer. Early detection and treatment of these diseases can dramatically improve survival rates. The OScan team at Stanford University has developed an affordable screening tool that brings standardized, multi-modal imaging of the oral cavity into the hands of rural health workers around the world, allowing individuals to easily and effectively screen for oral cancer. This inexpensive device mounts on a conventional camera phone and allows for data to be instantly transmitted to dentists and oral surgeons. OScan aims to provide a means to empower health workers to connect early stage patients to health care providers and teach communities about the importance of oral hygiene. stanford.edu/~manup/Oscan

3rd Place, winner of $100,000 – InSight, InVenture
In many developing countries small business entrepreneurs are unable to grow their businesses and take advantage of financial services simply due to the fact that they are perceived to be risky. With InSight, an SMS-based money management tool, these entrepreneurs can track their finances in their native language, increasing their financial literacy and more efficiently running their businesses. More importantly, InSight serves as a global credit rating platform for small business owners. By creating access to credit reporting opportunities for these individuals, InSight will help to lower interest rates, mitigate risk, and increase profits. This is a vital tool that will lift entrepreneurs and other individuals in developing countries out of poverty. www.inventure.org/using/lea...ut-insight

“The Vodafone Americas Foundation partnership with the mHealth Alliance is exceptionally powerful in that it allows us to propel ideas for wireless technology into action,” said Patty Mechael, Executive Director of the mHealth Alliance. “The field of mHealth is constantly growing, and now more than ever it is essential for us to support innovations that will enable us to overcome development challenges and have a meaningful impact on people’s lives. This kind of competition inspires entrepreneurs and innovators to explore unchartered territory, enabling the realization of visionary ideas that improve communities throughout the world.”

Open to nonprofit organizations, universities, and NGOs (Non-governmental Organizations) each year, the Wireless Innovation Project selects three winners and helps stimulate the projects through the next stages of development, such as prototyping and scaling. Since the Vodafone Americas Foundation Wireless Innovation Project was launched in 2009, nine winners have been awarded more than $1.8 million in cash and additional benefits. Vodafone provides invaluable support for the winning projects by integrating the teams with the foundation’s vast network of social entrepreneurs, NGO’s and international agencies.

ABOUT the Vodafone Americas Foundation Wireless Innovation Project™
Vodafone Americas Foundation™ launched the Wireless Innovation Project™ in 2009 to make a global impact through innovative wireless solutions. Applicants compete for first, second and third-place prizes worth $300,000, $200,000 and $100,000. The mHealth Alliance Award winner will receive an additional prize package worth $50,000, which includes strategic and networking support from the mHealth Alliance, an organization dedicated to enabling the use of mobile technologies to improve health throughout the world.
A panel of esteemed judges from the fields of wireless engineering, international development, social entrepreneurship, and business evaluate the applications for their potential to address issues in the fields of education, health, access to communication, the environment, and economic development.
Further details about the competition and winning projects can be found at project.vodafone-us.com. More information about the mHealth Alliance and its work can be found at www.mhealthalliance.org.

ABOUT the Vodafone Americas Foundation™
Vodafone Americas Foundation™ is part of Vodafone’s global network of foundations. It is affiliated with Vodafone Group Plc, the world's leading mobile telecommunications company, with ownership interests in more than 30 countries and Partner Markets in more than 40 countries. As of March 31, 2011, Vodafone had approximately 370 million proportionate customers worldwide. In the U.S., the foundation directs its philanthropic activities towards wireless technology projects in order to make a positive and enduring impact on the community. The Foundation is driven by a passion for the world around us. It makes grants that help people in the community and around the world lead fuller lives.

ABOUT the mHealth Alliance
The mHealth Alliance champions the use of mobile technologies to improve health throughout the world. Working with diverse partners to integrate mHealth into multiple sectors, the Alliance serves as a convener for the mHealth community to overcome common challenges by sharing tools, knowledge, experience, and lessons learned. The mHealth Alliance advocates for more and better quality research and evaluation to advance the evidence base; seeks to build capacity among health and industry decision-makers, managers, and practitioners; promotes sustainable business models; and supports systems integration by advocating for standardization and interoperability of mHealth platforms. The mHealth Alliance also hosts HUB (Health Unbound), a global online community for resource sharing and collaborative solution generation. Hosted by the United Nations Foundation, and founded by the Rockefeller Foundation, Vodafone Foundation, and UN Foundation, the Alliance now also includes HP, the GSM Association, and Norad among its founding partners. For more information, visit www.mhealthalliance.org.

April 14 2012

13:28

Open Source... and Six Blind Men - Houston NetSquared April Wrap-Up

On Tuesday, I had the honor of co-hosting this month's Houston NetSquared meetup featuring Jeff D. Frey, the Web services manager in Rice University's IT Department.  Jeff's role at Rice is to help all the different departments within the university as well as nonprofits in the Houston community identify the best software tools and then install and integrate them.

Jeff spoke to the members of the  Houston NetSquared on the good and bad things about open source technologies.  He approached the topic  from the perspective of nonprofit organizations and their communities based on his experience working with all kinds of software and hardware solutions at Rice.  Here's a wrap-up of Jeff Frey's presentation "Open Source ... and Six Blind Men."

Six Blind Men?

Jeff began his presentation with one of my favorite parable's 6 Blind Men and an ElephantEach man had a different impression of the Elephant after feeling just one part.

Jeff Frey uses this parable to explain that "Much like the elephant trainer, my role is to basically show you around the elephant of open source".

The Open Source Elephant

Just like the six blind men in the parable, Jeff described that there are six different perspectives in nonprofit organizations, and each of them typically only sees one piece of the total project being planned.

Jeff describes the people that typically see each perspective's piece of the open source elephant and talks about what he recommends nonprofit organizations should be aware of with open source tools to make sure each group's perspective fits into the total picture and everyone in  your nonprofit organization likes to use the new solution.

The 6 Perspectives of Open Source:

1)      Community

--  This is the group of people that follow the open source software or product and is usually a tight knit group.

According to Jeff, nonprofit organizations should take a look at how strong an open source's community is.  A strong community means the product will probably be better supported and have more "one off" or edge-case customizations that your nonprofit can benefit from for free or lower cost than if you had to pay for the custom development yourself.

2)      Customers

–-  The folks that a nonprofit serves including your members, donors, and visitors to your website.

The great thing about open source from your customers' perspective is that it can look really high end, has improved stability, and has fewer compatibility issues with web browsers.  Open source makes it easier for you to look like you know what you are doing to your customers even if you can barely use a WYSIWYG editor.

3)      Management

–-  Your Board members, Executive Director, and the decision makers at your organization.

From the perspective of your Board and those approving the budget for the project, open source is a very appealing option.  There are little to no software costs, no programmers, and the potential for no hardware costs.  As Jeff put it "You can basically run your whole nonprofit on open source tools with virtually no software costs."

4)      Employees

-–  The people most affected by the software package you select, the ones using it daily and sometimes this includes your volunteers.

Your employees and volunteers using the software everyday will want to know that the software will work and will be easy to use.  Different open source software options have varying levels of features and ease of use.  You'll want to look at how much training your employees will need before they use the new product and if it has the features your organization needs.  Jeff suggests starting with something little that your staff does daily with the current solution and see how the proposed software performs with that task.  Then keep adding new daily tasks, one at a time, and test them before deciding on a particular software product.

5)      Developers

–-  The application developers that constantly support and add new features and functionality to the open source software.

"It wouldn’t be an open source product without having developers", Jeff rightly states.  When looking at open source software, you should find out what are the code base standards and ask if there is a good, available API.  Find out what the language on which the software is built because some are more difficult to use, which increases programming hours for custom projects.

6)      Support Staff

--  These are your designated "power users" and can be internal or external to your organization.  Often this will be an IT consulting firm or Web design agency who customizes and updates your software.

When looking at open source solutions from the perspective of your power users, you will want to find an open source product that has a strong network of partners and support professionals.  Ask if the software has a regular schedule to roll out new versions and patches and find out about the hardware, network, back-up and maintenance processes and costs when comparing software.

Tell Us which of the six perspectives you think you fall under in our comments below!

I probably fall under the power user perspective in most cases, and in particular when talking about Tendenci.  I spend most of my days inside a Tendenci website updating content, adding events, creating training documentation, etc. and I honestly love it.

I want to leave you with a comment from an audience member Tuesday night at NetSquared:

" The thing about Open Source that I love is there is a huge community helping find the bugs before I have to find it, and fixes it, and I don’t have to pay for it or deal with it."

Here is Jeff D. Frey's presentation "Open Source... and Six Blind Men"
View this presentation and more Slideshare Presentations by Tendenci

January 13 2012

19:24

December 06 2011

22:50

Last Call for Entries for the 2012 Vodafone Americas Foundation Wireless Innovation Project & mHealth Alliance Award

December 31 Deadline Rapidly Approaching for Competition with $650,000 in Cash and Prizes for Wireless and mHealth Solutions



The Vodafone Americas Foundation and mHealth Alliance announced the last call for submissions for the annual Vodafone Americas Foundation Wireless Innovation Project™ and the mHealth Alliance Award, a competition designed to spark innovation and help solve pressing global issues. Proposals will be accepted through December 31.



"So far, we’ve received very unique and exciting solutions, and we’re encouraged by the caliber of the applicants who have submitted proposals," said June Sugiyama, Director of the Vodafone Americas Foundation. "This is the next generation of wireless innovation that can make a critical impact for problems facing millions of people around the globe.”



The Vodafone Americas Foundation™ launches the Wireless Innovation Project™ annually with a partnership with the mHealth Alliance. There is over $650,000 worth of prizes for solutions in the fields of education, health, access to communication, economic development, and the environment. Winners will acquire vast recognition as the frontrunners of a national competition. The partnership with the Vodafone Americas Foundation will last for three years following the presentation of the award.



Projects should be global in scope and must be at a stage of research where an advanced prototype or field/market test can occur during the award period. Proposals are due December 31, 2011, and winners will be announced at the Global Philanthropy Forum in April 2012. 



If you or someone you know is interested in applying, you can begin the application process at http://project.vodafone-us.com/application/questionnaire.php. Details about eligibility, the application, information on past winners and more can be found at project.vodafone-us.com. More information about the mHealth Alliance and its work can be found at mhealthalliance.org.




ABOUT the Vodafone Americas Foundation™
Vodafone Americas Foundation™ is part of Vodafone’s global network of foundations. It is affiliated with Vodafone Group Plc, the world's leading mobile telecommunications company, with ownership interests in more than 30 countries and Partner Markets in more than 40 countries. As of March 31, 2011, Vodafone had approximately 370 million proportionate customers worldwide. In the U.S., the foundation directs its philanthropic activities towards the San Francisco Bay and the Metro Denver Areas where most Vodafone employees live and work, and where it strives to make a positive and enduring impact on the community. The Foundation is driven by a passion for the world around us. It makes grants that help people in the community and around the world lead fuller lives.
 


ABOUT the mHealth Alliance
The mHealth Alliance champions the use of mobile technologies to improve health throughout the world. Working with diverse partners to integrate mHealth into multiple sectors, the Alliance serves as a convener for the mHealth community to overcome common challenges by sharing tools, knowledge, experience, and lessons learned. The mHealth Alliance advocates for more and better quality research and evaluation to advance the evidence base; seeks to build capacity among health and industry decision-makers, managers, and practitioners; promotes sustainable business models; and supports systems integration by advocating for standardization and interoperability of mHealth platforms. The mHealth Alliance also hosts HUB (Health Unbound), a global online community for resource sharing and collaborative solution generation. Hosted by the United Nations Foundation, and founded by the Rockefeller Foundation, Vodafone Foundation, and UN Foundation, the Alliance now also includes PEPFAR, HP, the GSM Association, and NORAD among its founding partners. For more information, visit www.mhealthalliance.org.

June 15 2011

06:09

NetSquared Adelaide: Show and Tell

Volcanic ash clouds, uni exams and end-of-financial-year busy-ness couldn’t keep us from meeting! Even though the numbers were smaller than our past events, the conversation was rich and inspiring.

NetSquared Adelaide has been meeting now for four months, and each of the monthly meetings has had its own flavour and style. The community has been steadily growing over the months. The format of the first meet-ups were based around hearing from guest speakers, generating a bit of group discussion on the topics raised and then offer some time for networking.

This time around, the meetup was about us, as a community.

The idea behind the “Show and Tell” event was to allow everyone who attended a chance to share what they’re up to in the ‘social good’ space.

Compared to our last tech-laden meetup (we collaborated live across groups on Google Docs, had a fantastic smart board, used video and audio recording gear and had laptops/iPads galore), we went old school and simply talked around a large table at a dimly lit pub, sharing a drink and large bucket of chips together.

As we went around the table, each person had plenty of time to share and respond to questions. As people began sharing about what they’re doing and what they’re passionate about, we continually discovered areas of overlap. People would chime in with their own points and the comment “You should talk to...” was thrown around a lot.

People were getting excited about other people’s passions.

We heard about online art communities, fiery 80 year olds wanting to see social change through urban development, the values of open source and open education, using social media to spread a message, challenges of getting older communities to embrace new technology, using online tools to rally people around a cause, and more!

Most of the people stayed on longer to share a meal and continued the conversations that were happening.

It was a great night out, and even though the numbers were small, the discussions and the relationships that came from it were valuable. As we were saying our goodbyes, it really felt as if strangers had met new friends and that a real sense of community was being forged.

The next NetSquared Adelaide meetup will be about community building. Find the event on MeetUp.

May 25 2011

10:32

Intro to Twitter for Nonprofits and Social Enterprises: #VirtualNet2 Slides, Audio, and Wrap-up

This post outlines how Net2Camb hosted it's first livestreamed event, provides information about how view the slides and listen to the audio, and overviews our future plans for providing more live and recorded Netsquared Local event content in the future.

About the event

Participants at Net2Camb Event. Courtesy Andrew Entecott.

Ellie Stonely graciously offered to share her experiences using Twitter with our NetSquared Local group in Cambridge, UK. The topic was Intro to Twitter for Charities and Social Enterprises. In the talk, Ellie led a strategy-based conversation sharing case studies, lessons learned, and first steps for people and organizations that are interested in trying Twitter for the first time. 

The event was held on 24 May 2011, at Cambridge Online. You can read a few excerpts from the event on Storify.

About the livestream

A few weeks ago I got a note from Steven Flower, the NetSquared Local organizer in Manchester, asking if the group I help manage in Cambridge wanted to collaborate in real-time from 130 miles away. His email started: "Just a random thought, but we too have our Meetup scheduled in Manchester on the SAME DAY! Right now, we haven't a speaker or anything, so here is my crazy idea". The email went on to outline a way to stream content over the web to provide an event speaker in both cities simultaneously. I love crazy ideas and I knew it would add value to our efforts, so of course I said YES!

Now, I'm no techie, but Steven had been testing out a tool called Ipadio for streaming and sharing audio within his group. He suggested that we could upload the slides before the event and use Ipadio on a mobile phone to stream the audio live. We could also share ideas and feedback in real-time with virtual participants using the #virtualnet2 hashtag as a twitter backchannel.

His plan worked a charm!

For anyone else intersted in using this solution for their events, here are a few of my lessons learned:

  • The speaker needs to give an audio cue to the virtual participants every time she changes slides. We did this by having someone other than the speaker flip through the slides, which gave the speaker a reminder to say "next slide please". We also tweeted out (using the event hashtag) which slide we were on in the room.
  • The speaker needs a microphone. An easy way to do this is to clip a headset/mic that comes with many smartphones onto the blouse of the speaker, and ask her to put the phone in her pocket after you log in. No need to plug the headphones in her ears though - it's a one-way channel!
  • Test the audio before the event. Make sure it's not too echoy or quiet. Make sure you know how to log in.

It's not too late to participate!

Ellie Stonely Speaks at Net2Camb Event. Courtesy Andrew Entecott.

While we did a lot to provide an interactive experience in real-time, if you missed the event you can still access the content to review in your own time. Here's how to access it:

  1. Open or download Ellie’s Slides
  2. Open the audio stream
  3. Use the #virtualNet2 hashtag to share ideas on Twitter. The speaker is @e11ie5 and the host group is @Net2Camb.

The future for #VirtualNet2

This wasn't the first NetSquared Local event to be streamed online and it certainly won't be the last. The Philladelphia NetSquared group, for instance, have been pioneers at streaming Local content and have inspired much of our thinking for the Cambridge-Manchester event.

In the future, we plan to make it easier for people interested in participating in events virtually. Soon, we'll be launching a Virtual NetSquared Local option "officially" but if you'd like to be automatically notified of future events you can go ahead and sign up on the Virtual NetSquared Local meetup page today.

Thank yous

The first big THANK YOU goes to the community and event participants in Cambridge, Manchester, and aroudn the world. Thank you for bearing with us when things didn't go quite to plan (for instance when the slides were posted about 5 minutes before the talk!) and thank you for encouraging us to make the event happen - both online and in-person.

To the fabulous Ellie Stonely. For providing excellent resources, ideas, and conversation. Your situation yesterday wasn't ideal, but you really pulled through!

To Andrew Entecott and Cambridge Online. For being our gracious sponsors of the event, even during this rough time.

To Steven Flower. Thanks for the hard work, inspiration, publicity, and friendship.

To Manchester Net Tuesday. You guys rock and I can't wait to have another event where you stream to us!

To James and the other folks at Ipadio. Thank you for your technical support!

May 18 2011

02:45

NetSquared Adelaide - How technology is changing the face of science

Our third NetSquared Adelaide event was a great success, attracting people from across the city to find out how technology is impacting the science world. Katie Hannan, from SAcommunity came along and shared her thoughts:

On Monday I went along to Talk Social and Science, an event held by the Adelaide NetSquared Meetup Group. This group works on and offline to connect communities at the intersection of technology and social change. Monday night's event featured two speakers talking about how online social technology is making an impact in the scientific world.

Dr. Kristin Alford from Bridge8 spoke about how online tools are being used to make learning more exciting for school students. It's an innovative way of using technology to encourage people to get into topics of interest that they may not normally be engaged in.

Scott Mills shared some fantastic insights into the use of crowdsourcing, citizen science and open source hardware/software in scientific research. This approach can have significant impact in just about any industry.

The overall theme of the event was  Science Communication (the practice of communicating scientific principles to the public) and how online social technology is making an impact in the scientific world.

If you're interested in learning some more about science communication or becoming a science communicator, then you might want to check in with the Australian National University's Centre for the Public Awareness of Science or the Australian Science Communicators

If you're a scientist and you're looking to engage with communities outside of your regular network, then you might want to get involved with the I'm a Scientist Get me Out of Here program, ScienceMob or perhaps you'd like to start documenting the natural environment around you by participating in some projects like these:

Or get in touch with some of these science related organisations that are hosted on SAcommunity:

This blog originally featured on the Connecting Up Australia website.

 

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