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April 27 2012

19:54

At the International Journalism Festival: Can Data Journalism Save Newsrooms?

PERUGIA, Italy -- Here at the International Journalism Festival the launch of three large initiatives have generated a lot of the buzz around data journalism.

The School of Data Journalism, organized by the European Journalism Centre and the Open Knowledge Foundation, is composed of three panels and five workshops and dives into some of the key issues that media organizations are currently considering: "Is it worth my while starting out trying to do data journalism?", "Will data journalism make us money?", "How do you get data that you can search, filter and analyze with a computer?" and "How do I make data stories sexy?"

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In addition, the 58 nominations for the Data Journalism Awards (DJA) were announced. DJA is the first international competition that recognizes and showcases the great work done in data journalism. Prizes are awarded for data-driven applications, investigations, and storytelling through visualizations. It's hoped that these awards will encourage more news organizations to embark on more ambitious data projects and alleviate the "loneliness in the newsroom" which some data journalists experience when their colleagues don't understand what they do. The six winners will be announced May 31.

And on Saturday, the Data Journalism Handbook will be launched. The handbook was born at the Mozilla Festival in November. It's a collection of tips, anecdotes and case studies from more than 70 leading data journalists and data wranglers, including contributions from The New York Times, Zeit Online, the BBC, the Guardian and many more. The book will be an open educational resource with key lessons a beginner data journalist should know. You can see a chapter overview of the handbook here and an excerpt from the first chapter here. A free version will be available online at datajournalismhandbook.org, and an e-book and print version will soon be published by O'Reilly Media.

So what is data journalism?

The School of Data Journalism, a series of panel discussions and workshops at the festival, was led by leading practitioners from all over the world and aimed to show participants what data journalists can do and why they should take the plunge and learn new skills.

The definition of data journalism varies depending on whom you ask. For some journalists, it's simply the courage to tackle sometimes huge and messy datasets. For others, it's being transparent and open about "showing the working" behind their conclusions, backing up their stories with facts and numbers where one might previously have only evidenced their point with "he said/she said." For others, it's a new way of presenting data through visualizations and interactive news applications; news is no longer simply static words on a page.

Increasingly, though, many are coming to realize that data journalism is a set of skills, involving new methods for acquiring, analyzing and working with data which simply weren't computationally feasible before. In an age that is positively drowning in data, we need more data journalists who typically have better storytelling skills than statisticians and can act as translators of complex datasets for the benefit of the public.

As activist and author Heather Brooke put it in the "Information wants to be free" workshop, data journalism is a misnomer -- one doesn't say "telephone journalism" if you contact your sources via telephone; journalists have to use data to do their job well.

Guerrilla Tactics: how to get started with Data Journalism

In the first panel of the school, "From Computer Assisted Reporting to Data Journalism," Pulitzer Prize winners Sarah Cohen and Steve Doig, highlighted their experiences working in the United States, where the notion of Computer Assisted Reporting (CAR) has been around for several decades -- far longer than the budding data journalism scene here in Europe.

They described their experiences learning how to use tools and techniques -- unfamiliar to journalists but popular in other disciplines such as social science and history -- to stay at the cutting edge of journalism. They also described the "guerrilla tactics" they initially had to use to get their work into print. "If you produce an amazing visualization, your editor is going to find a way to get it published," Cohen said, adding that it's far easier to show someone what data journalism is than to explain what it is.

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Next up, Aron Pilhofer described his journey to data journalism at the New York Times. He said it came from a feeling of frustration with the inefficiency of working practices and tools. This sentiment resonated strongly with the other panelists -- a common complaint concerned individual journalists holding onto their data, producing datasets that only they could understand, instead of resources that could be built on and expanded by others on their teams.

On the same panel, Elisabetta Tola of formicablu and Simon Rogers of the Guardian gave a European perspective on data journalism. Rogers demonstrated how the Guardian Datablog's interactive maps of the U.K. riots helped disband false statements by the government that the "riots were not about poverty." Tola then explained some of the more basic problems facing wannabe data journalists in Italy, some of whom would be lucky to get data even on paper, as it's common for officials to simply dictate the numbers to journalists.

The second panel, "How can data journalism save your newsroom?", examined perspectives and business models for data journalism, and attempted to answer the question: "Is it worth it?"

Caelainn Barr of Citywire urged journalists not to consider data journalism as a fix-all that will save anything. She warned that editors are unlikely to be considerate and give you more time just because you're using complex data or working hard to present it better. Barr said journalists are constantly playing a game of catchup; advertisers are moving elsewhere; and journalists have less time to produce their stories and are struggling to keep up. All of this means journalists have to be more agile and learn to do things more efficiently.

To solve this problem, Pilhofer said, the New York Times has built resources that live on for future stories, allowing both journalists and the interactive news team to spring into action as soon as a related story breaks.

"What is the simplest thing you can do to start with data journalism?" ProPublica's Dan Nguyen asked rhetorically. "Keep your notes in a spreadsheet." He said often, the skills required to find stories involve sorting, grouping and averaging the data. With skills this simple, can newsrooms really afford not to teach them to their journalists?

The Future of Journalism is Bold

What does the future look like for data journalism? "Data journalism is just becoming journalism," said the Guardian's Rogers -- which was possibly the most encouraging statement from any of the panelists here.

Data journalism is no longer limited to only those who can afford to pay $900 for a piece of visualization software. Now incredibly powerful, open-source solutions are available. Organizations such as ProPublica encourage others to use their approaches in other stories to bring data journalism to local levels.

However, a change in culture will be needed to get more journalists into the fold. As Tola explained, collaboration is key, both journalist-journalist and journalist-coder collaboration. As Wired Italy's Guido Romeo put it, "Journalism is a one-man band. Data journalism is clearly not."

As technology develops, the ways of presenting this information just become more exciting. Could Italy be a land of opportunity for data journalism? The enthusiasm with which the workshops were met gave the impression that he who dares first will have a serious competitive advantage.

The workshops will continue over the next couple of days, and many have spaces open. Any budding data journalists? Join us! The Data Journalism Handbook will be launched at 6:30 p.m. PDT on April 28.

13:04

Free Data Journalism Handbook launched tomorrow

Data Journalism Handbook

I’ve contributed to a “free, open-source book that aims to help journalists to use data to improve the news” – and it will be published online tomorrow (Saturday 28th April)

The Data Journalism Handbook was coordinated by the European Journalism Centre and the Open Knowledge Foundation (in particular Liliana Bounegru), and includes contributions from:

“Dozens of data journalism’s leading advocates and best practitioners – including from Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the BBC, the Chicago Tribune, Deutsche Welle, the Guardian, the Financial Times, Helsingin Sanomat, La Nacion, the New York Times, ProPublica, the Washington Post, the Texas Tribune, Verdens Gang, Wales Online, Zeit Online and many others.”

The book will be available for download at datajournalismhandbook.org under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License. There will also be a printed and e-book version published by O’Reilly Media.

13:04

Free Data Journalism Handbook launched tomorrow

Data Journalism Handbook

I’ve contributed to a “free, open-source book that aims to help journalists to use data to improve the news” – and it will be published online tomorrow (Saturday 28th April)

The Data Journalism Handbook was coordinated by the European Journalism Centre and the Open Knowledge Foundation (in particular Liliana Bounegru), and includes contributions from:

“Dozens of data journalism’s leading advocates and best practitioners – including from Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the BBC, the Chicago Tribune, Deutsche Welle, the Guardian, the Financial Times, Helsingin Sanomat, La Nacion, the New York Times, ProPublica, the Washington Post, the Texas Tribune, Verdens Gang, Wales Online, Zeit Online and many others.”

The book will be available for download at datajournalismhandbook.org under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License. There will also be a printed and e-book version published by O’Reilly Media.

December 01 2011

18:35

Seize the Data Day with Open Knowledge Foundation

On December 3rd at the Barbican Centre in London, the Open Knowledge Foundation will be inviting everyone and anyone who can wrangle up a good bit of data or wrangle the wranglers of data, to a Seize the Data event.

So they could do with some screen scraping, data extracting, coding extraordinaires (i.e. you).

So if you’re free and happen to be in London, please park your diggers outside their door and start turning the scraper cogs towards evil PDFs.

Sign up here.


July 04 2011

18:48

We Eat Data – ScraperWiki talk at Open Knowledge Conference 2011

Our tamed computer programmer, ‘The Julian’, recently gave a rare appearance at the Open Knowledge Conference in Berlin (if you want an appearance pay us or ask us!). The spectacle of such scraping royalty drew more people than the room could accommodate (‘The Julian’ is not related to any royals living or deceased). As such I have included the slides here:

We were honoured to be amongst an outstanding line-up of speakers. We also ran a workshop the week of the conference and you can see the German data we scraped into ScraperWiki on the OKCon2011 tag.

What was most interesting about the workshop is that we see the same types of data needed for similar projects wherever we go. Tobias Escher wants to do something similar to AlphaGov for Germany called Meine Demokratie. A lot of very simple little scrapers can go a long way and if there’s anyone looking to play around with scraping and ScraperWiki, or who would like to lend a coding hand to a worthy cause please to click the above link.

‘The Julian’ was also looking for a scraping challenge and the workshop gnomes found Berlin schools data. I showed those in attendance one of my favourite sites made from scrapers:  Schooloscope. So Julian is scraping the data for Berlin schools in various stages and the hope is to get all the data for schools in Germany to make a German schooloscope.

We have one lovely lady very interested in getting this project on its way so if you are willing, if you speak German and if you know where to find them maybe you can scrape German schools data.

So watch out useful things to know in Germany including schools – you’re being ScraperWikied!

(As ScraperWiki is being used for better and better things, this will just get harder for me…)


January 12 2011

12:24

A portal for European government data: PublicData.eu plans

The Open Knowledge Foundation have published a blog post with notes on a site they’re developing to gather together data from across Europe. The post notes that the growth of data catalogues at both a national level (mentioning the Digitalisér.dk data portal run by the Danish National IT and Telecom Agency) and “countless city level initiatives across Europe as well – from Helsinki to Munich, Paris to Zaragoza.” with many more initiatives “in the pipeline with plans to launch in the next 6 to 12 months.”

PublicData.eu will, it says:

“Provide a single point of access to open, freely reusable datasets from numerous national, regional and local public bodies throughout Europe.

“[It] will harvest and federate this information to enable users to search, query, process, cache and perform other automated tasks on the data from a single place. This helps to solve the “discoverability problem” of finding interesting data across many different government websites, at many different levels of government, and across the many governments in Europe.”

What is perhaps even more interesting for journalists is that the site plans to:

“Capture (proposed) edits, annotations, comments and uploads from the broader community of public data users.”

That might include anything from cleaner versions of data, to instances where developers match datasets together, or where users add annotations that add context to a particular piece of information.

Finally there’s a general indication that the site hopes to further lower the bar for data and collaborative journalism by:

“Providing basic data analysis and visualisation tools together with more in-depth resources for those looking to dig deeper into the data. Users will be able to personalise their data browsing experience by being able to save links and create notes and comments on datasets.”

More in the post itself. Worth keeping an eye on.

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