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May 12 2013

20:07

Innovid’s Powers Interactive Ads for Crackle Across Multiple Devices

Innovid, a New York-based  provider of interactive video ad technology, recently launched a program with with Sony Crackle to serve ads across multiple devices. Beet.TV spoke with CTO and co-founder Tal Chalozin about this and other company developments in this video interview.

“The premise is that marketers that want to reach their audience can focus on finding the right audience and delivering the commercial without thinking in silos – without thinking, ‘this is a online video, this is a mobile video or this is a connected TV video or gaming console.’”

Disney is the first advertiser to use this new technology. For Disney’s recent movie Oz the Great and Powerful, Disney earned 300 percent more time spent and 6.7 percent of viewers engaged with the interactive ad, Chalozin says.

A recent study by Innovid involving 50 interactive ad campaigns for theatrical releases found that 15 out of 20 opening weekend top-grossing films were using the technology and over 4.5 percent of viewers engaged with the interactive ad, compared to the industry average reported by Google of 0.67 percent.

 

April 15 2013

10:08

Sony Highlights 4K Production Technology at MIP Show

CANNES – While the streaming or broadcasting super high quality  4K (four times the highest HD) by  the world’s broadcasters is still in the working stage, as the industry seeks to adopt compression standards, the camera and editing of the new format is beginning to take hold with both Hollywood producers and some broadcasters including the BBC and Sky Germany, says Sony’s  Yoshiaki-Joe Nakata in this interview with Beet.TV at the MIP conference.

Sony presented a 4K mini-event at MIP.

 

 

November 11 2011

17:50

August 01 2011

05:49

Mobile innovation - Suicides of workers, Foxconn to replace staff with 1 million robots in 3 years

Xinhuanet | English News :: Foxconn is not only the world's largest maker of computer components and employer of 1.2 million people. The company, which assembles products for Apple, Sony and Nokia, has recently been in the spotlight after a string of suicides of workers at its massive Chinese plants, which some blamed on tough working conditions. The Taiwanese technology giant, will replace some of its workers with 1 million robots in three years to cut rising labor expenses and improve efficiency, said Terry Gou, founder and chairman of the company, late Friday. The currently 10,000 robots will be increased to 300,000 next year.

Time machine :: Foxconn has been in the news due to a series of suicides of workers at its Shenzhen/China plant - (here one of three videos available on YouTube; Engadget published a translated version of the original Chinese article, "The fate of generation of workers: Foxconn undercover", see link below): 


Continue to read yan, news.xinhuanet.com

Original article about the Foxconn suicides in English Richard Lai, www.engadget.com

July 26 2011

05:45

Nortel's 6,000 patents - Google's Ken Walker: patents are "government-granted monopolies"

Apple Insider :: Google Senior Vice President and General Counsel Ken Walker had indicated in April that Google was interested in a collection of 6,000 patents from bankrupt Canadian telecommunications equipment maker Nortel because "many of [Google's] competitors have larger portfolios given their longer histories." The search giant succeeded in placing the initial "stalking horse" bid, but ultimately lost out to a group consisting of Apple and other competitors, including as Microsoft, Research in Motion and Sony.

Shortly after the auction's results were announced, he posted a short statement describing the outcome as "disappointing for anyone who believes that open innovation benefits users and promotes creativity and competition," but declined to comment more on the matter.

Apple Insider interviewed Ken Walker calling for patent reform in the U.S. as he characterized patents as "government-granted monopolies".

Continue to read Josh Ong, www.appleinsider.com

June 19 2011

17:47

The End of the road for Netflix?

Associated Press | Yahoo! :: Sony movies were pulled from Netflix Inc.'s online streaming service Friday because of what Netflix said is a "temporary contract issue" between Sony Corp. and its pay TV distributor, Starz. Netflix notified its members in a blog post on Friday, when movies such as "Easy A" and "Grown Ups" stopped being available on its "Watch Instantly" service. They are still available to be rented as DVDs through the mail.

Continue to read Ryan Nakashima, finance.yahoo.com

Further discussed here as well: "Is it Finally the End of the Road for Netflix?" Rokko Pendola, seekingalpha.com

May 18 2010

19:31

4 Reasons Why 3D TV Is Years Away From Adoption

After a multi-decade struggle, 3D is finally catching on in theatres.

It was a challenge for 3D movies to get where they are today, but I'd say the studios (and theater operators) are finally calling it a success. All the pieces have come together, spurred on by financial support of the infrastructure and much-needed exposure of the latest 3D technology thanks to "Avatar."

The prospects for 3D television, however, are another story. I like the concept of another dimension as much as the next guy, but can the big screen 3D theater experience translate into the typical living room setting? In my opinion, not really. At least not yet. From a design standpoint, it's going to take time for consumers to buy into the idea of 3D TV.

While the technology's developers may think they're sitting on a gold mine here, they've unfortunately failed to consider some critical issues that will severely slow its adaption. As a result, here are four reasons why 3D is years away from adoption in the home.

1. Different Context

The assumption that acceptance and desire for a technology in one environment (movie theaters) will translate well to another (home) is a mistake that's easy to make. But, in this case, several differences between the contexts will deter adoption of 3D in the home.

At the theater, it's about a communal experience of many people joining together to be entertained in a way they can't replicate at home. They want to go out for the evening and make an event out of it. But entertainment at home is by its nature a more casual and personal experience that, with the advent of 3D, raises issues such as:

  • Will there be enough 3D glasses for everyone to enjoy the experience? What about guests?
  • The hassle and comfort factor of wearing the hardware at home.
  • The extremely limited availability of desirable content in 3D. And would we really want to watch the local news or "American Idol" in more than two dimensions even if it were possible?
  • It requires a significant investment of money to upgrade for what is (by many accounts at CES) minimal improvement in the viewing experience.

2. High Cost

In these (post?) recessionary times, people view large expenditures differently than they did a few years ago, when every room in the house was seen as a prime spot for a new flat screen. 3D-TV is not the sort of design solution people are willing to spend money on these days. The industry is pushing an expensive novelty that adds little of the kind of meaningful benefit consumers look for in high-end purchases.

3dtv.jpg

The economic downturn has encouraged consumers to re-examine their shopping behavior, and they've become more thoughtful and considerate of their purchases. Buying decisions fueled by novelty or impulse have been replaced by a desire for long-term value from a product, with benefits that consumers readily see as adding to the quality of their lives. Consumers now ask themselves "Will this make my life easier, better, or more fulfilling?" rather than "Oh, look at that shiny new toy, I want one!" -- especially if it's a matter of several hundred or thousand dollars.

3. Poor Timing

People will eventually replace their current flat screens when needed, and may well consider 3D at that time. But 3D will not, on its own, be a compelling reason to buy a new TV for most consumers within the next few years. The flat screens in use now are largely recent purchases, with many years of service life to come. People bought into these TVs too recently to consider an upgrade within the next couple of years.

4. Lack of Universal Standard

The adoption of 3D-TV faces a similar challenge to the acceptance of Blu-ray DVDs, but without the "stick" the DVD market has had -- the threat that standard discs will be discontinued, forcing a (relatively inexpensive) upgrade to a new player. Blu-ray may be the new standard format for DVDs, but 2D-television is not going anywhere for the foreseeable future. And with incompatible 3D technologies competing in the market right now, it's inevitable that consumers will wait on the sidelines until a universal format like Blu-ray becomes the norm.

Missing the Point

So will 3D-TV eventually catch on? Inevitably the tech will improve, enough homes will be at a stage to upgrade to new screens, prices will come down, it may no longer require glasses and so forth. But for the moment, 3D simply doesn't deliver a meaningful experience to consumers on the home front. The value they will place on the technology is not at all commensurate with the hassles and costs of adapting it.

Home entertainment is about spending enjoyable time with family and friends, kicking back and forgetting about the stress of the day. Any new technology aimed at this market has to be responsive to the underlying needs people have for this aspect of their lives. The DVR is a perfect example of truly meaningful design in this arena, and its rapid success was virtually ensured from the day it was introduced. It solved a problem and addressed a compelling desire.

Similarly, instant access to movies and events through direct streaming to your TV has taken this desire for personal control over TV viewing to a new level. That's the kind of innovation people are looking to spend money on right now. Online gaming, direct to TV, seems to be the natural evolution of this trend. Several companies have promised that, as soon as next year, we'll be able to stream the latest games to our TVs without the need for a dedicated console that's obsolete in two years. Play when you like on a subscription basis, no need to invest in games that you may tire of in a few weeks. If it works as promised, I think it's going to be a huge success.

But for now, I think Sony and other manufacturers betting big on 3D TV have missed the point. Design and innovation have to be in sync with consumer needs, even if they lead by a year or two. Pushing 3D TV seems like more of a "we can do it, so let's do it" approach to product development, ignoring the reality that adding simulated depth to the at-home viewing experience is pretty low on most people's priorities right now.

Image of 3D dinosaur by Mark Wallace via Flickr.

Joel Delman is the Los Angeles-based design director of Product Development Technologies. With a background in corporate law and business, and 15 years in product development, Joel understands the business side of creativity and how to strategically guide innovation and design. Prior to joining PDT, Joel spent time as a senior designer for Zenith Electronics, Cousins Design and Henry Dreyfuss Associates (New York). He also practiced corporate law with Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart in Florida. Joel received his Master of Industrial Design from Pratt Institute, his JD (corporate and patent) from Harvard Law School and his Bachelor's in Economics from New York University's Stern School of Business. His personal blog is Product Fetish.

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March 19 2010

22:49

4-Minute Roundup: Google TV Disrupts; Facebook Passes Google

This episode of 4MR is brought to you by the Knight Digital Media Center, providing a spectrum of training for the 21st century journalist. Find out more at KDMC's website. It's also underwritten by GoDaddy, helping you set up your own website in a snap with domain name registration, web hosting and 24/7 support. Visit GoDaddy to learn more.

Here's the latest 4MR audio report from MediaShift. In this week's edition, I look at Google TV, the new alliance between Google, Intel, Sony and Logitech to create a new TV or set-top box that will finally connect the TV with the Net in a simple way. Plus, Facebook last week surpassed Google in traffic for the U.S., according to Experian Hitwise, and Facebook referrals to news sites were more loyal visitors than referrals from Google News or the Google search engine. And I asked Just One Question to Time magazine TV critic James Poniewozik, getting his take on Google TV.

Check it out:

4mrbareaudio31910.mp3

>>> Subscribe to 4MR <<<

>>> Subscribe to 4MR via iTunes <<<

Listen to my entire interview with James Poniewozik:

Background music is "What the World Needs" by the The Ukelele Hipster Kings via PodSafe Music Network.

Here are some links to related sites and stories mentioned in the podcast:

Google and Partners Seek TV Foothold at NY Times

Google TV Should Finally Push Apple TV Beyond A Hobby at TechCrunch

It's Official - Facebook Rules the Web at PC World

Facebook surpasses Google in weekly traffic at San Jose Mercury News

How Facebook overtook Google to be the top spot on the Internet at Fortune Brainstormtech

Facebook edges past Google for weekly traffic at SFGate's Tech Chronicles

Facebook Visitors Come Back Again and Again at Hitwise blog

If You Tell Them On Facebook, They Will Come...Again and Again at ReadWriteWeb

The Google giant begins to topple at Network World

Check out some of our write-in answers to last week's poll question about what people thought about geo-location services such as Foursquare:

survey answers foursquare.jpg

Also, be sure to vote in our poll about what you think about your cable or satellite service:




What do you think about your cable or satellite TV service?answers

Mark Glaser is executive editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He also writes the bi-weekly OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. He lives in San Francisco with his son Julian. You can follow him on Twitter @mediatwit.

This episode of 4MR is brought to you by the Knight Digital Media Center, providing a spectrum of training for the 21st century journalist. Find out more at KDMC's website. It's also underwritten by GoDaddy, helping you set up your own website in a snap with domain name registration, web hosting and 24/7 support. Visit GoDaddy to learn more.

This is a summary. Visit our site for the full post ».

January 07 2010

15:53

GOOD NEWS FOR MEDIA COMPANIES: THE APPLE TABLET NEEDS CONTENT, CONTENT, CONTENT

beta_vhs_480

Do you remember the story of JVC’s VHS versus Sony’s BETAMAX?

Yes, Sony’s format was better with more reproduction quality, but…

JVC’s  had more movies available and at the end of the day, content prevailed over technology.

Well, now you can understand why Brian Marshall says that “for Apple, content is the focus of the tablet.”

Look at the Google Phone, the Super Phone, the “iPhone Killer”…

The Nexus One could be better as a product (it’s not) but the iPhone has these 100.000 applications, so the game is over.

The same is going to happen with the new upcoming tablets.

The key for the success of the Apple one  will be not the hardware but the software.

And just channeling these 100.000 applications to the new tablet will be enough to win the war.

The Apple tablet will have, I am sure, brilliant hardware.

Superb design.

Great usability.

Magnificent navigation tools…

But, again, it’s the software, stupid!

It’s the wine, not the bottle.

Or as the British used to say when the first computers were presented as “the” solution to have better education in the scholols:

“Garbage IN, Garbage Out”

So, good news for media companies and other content-driven providers.

The Apple tablet loves your content.

Apple wants your content.

Apple needs your content.

Music content made the difference for the iTunes and iPod.

So Multimedia content will make the difference for the Apple iTablet.

Are you ready?

Well, if your newspaper still dosen’t have an iPhone application, I don’t believe you.

You are NOT ready.

And shame to you and to your IT people!

November 21 2009

09:49

SONY’S ORGANIC TRANSISTORS DISPLAYS AND THE FLEXIBLE DIGITAL NEWSPAPERS

2009-11-21_0939

Sony has presented the first prototypes of a new digital flexible display devices.

As you can watch in this video, the organic transistors technology provides the needed flexibility to fold, roll, and add applications with sensors and input devices.

img_01

Expensive?

Yes, these are breaking ground prototypes, but there is a huge market for these flexible digital displays.

And more flexible than these ones.

That’s the reason of my expression “rubber newspapers”

As INNOVATION has been preaching for more than 20 years, this is the future of almost any news digital display.

Like the first stone carved newspapers, we are still in the Digital Acta Diurna Era, displaying today’s news content in “digital stones” doesn’t matter if they are called flat computers, fancy smart phones or, pay attention to the word, digital “tablets”.

That’s good news for all of us, news content producers and consumers.

So, don’t worry about the future of print newspapers, and concentrate, invest and excel on unique multi-media story-telling.

The rest is history.

November 20 2009

03:42

Adobe Aims to Dominate Software Format for eReaders

Adobe sees a big growth opportunity in the emerging eReader market, says Bill Rusitzky, who heads media alliances for the software company.

The company is heavily promoting its ePub product which will be used in the Nook and the Sony eReader. It is not used in the Kindle and will not likely be used in the anticipated Apple Tablet.

MediaMemo's Peter Kafka reports on the looming software battles over formats for the new devices.

I interviewed Bill last month in New York at the Beet.TV Online Video Roundtable.

Andy Plesser, Executive Producer

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