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February 04 2012

19:03

Make Every Ad Perform Like a Super Bowl Ad

If you are curious how social media analytics firms are helping brands, Networked Insights, a social media analytics and marketing start-up, has published a free report, tied to the Super Bowl, on how you can use  real-time social data to understand your audiences and deliver them relevant content....

June 02 2011

16:04

Donald Mahoney: Internet journalism after content farms or "What time does the Super Bowl start?"

Some Blind Alleys :: On February 6, 2011, the Huffington Post published what has become one of the most infamous and emblematic stories of the internet journalism age. The story concerned the starting time of Super Bowl XLV. Its headline was: “What Time Does The Super Bowl Start?” and it still owns the top Google ranking for the query.

Consider this overly obvious, if oddly formal intro sentence: “Super Bowl 2011 takes place on Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. Eastern Time and 3:30 p.m. Pacific Time.”

The sentence defies the perception that news in the digital era must be as direct and succinct as possible.

"What time does the Super Bowl start? Or, internet journalism after content farms" - continue to read Donald Mahoney, someblindalleys.com

February 06 2011

19:11

The Visual Appeal of Super Bowl Sunday

In case you haven’t heard or seen, Super Bowl XLV TV coverage begins on Fox Sports at 2 p.m ET today, with the kickoff at 6:29 p.m. ET.

Fans, sponsors, and more are pulling out the stops for what’s being described as a classic matchup between two old-school, cheerleader-less football franchises in an unexpectedly icy stadium.

For a sport that has never failed to capture national attention, it’s interesting to see the size of each team’s respective fan nations are in landmass — and to notice how the Green Bay Packers and Pittsburgh Steelers areas are almost evenly matched.

Here’s graphic designer Jared Fanning‘s take:

The United States of Football by Jared Fanning

A slightly different, visually exciting version was posted on I Love Charts:

The United States of Football, from I Love Charts

National spectacle knows no bounds, however, and Visa, smartly, is taking advantage with dynamic visualizations of Twitter chatter, including a look at football-related trending topics in the days leading up to today’s big game:

Visa Super Bowl Twitter trending topics map

Not everyone will be focused on Super Bowl pre-game coverage, or at least that’s what Animal Planet is counting on.

The Puppy Bowl is back, offering entertainment to those who prefer tumbling fuzzy animals to the charging bulls of the gridiron. Broadcast starts at 3 p.m. ET (tape delayed to 3 p.m. Pacific).

Meanwhile, advertisers have put up big bank to be a part of today’s big game. “Fox was seeking between $2.8 million and $3 million for 30 seconds of time,” writes AdAge, which rounds up facts on all the spots.

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February 26 2010

07:55

So You Want to Try Crowdsourcing?

It is no secret that I'm always on the hunt for great crowdsourcing projects. We're still learning a lot about what "the crowd" can tackle and what it can't, but turning to your readers (listeners, community, neighbors) is a great way to foster civic participation because it gives people a stake in the news.

What I really want to know, though, is what makes crowdsourcing sing? Sunlight's Transparency Corps project to slice Kentucky legislative voting records has been sitting less than half complete for months now, while the Brooklyn Museum's "posse" is madly tagging, flagging and organizing projects digital photos of the museum's permanent collection. The only reward offered by Brooklyn Museum, besides a crash course in art history, are the series of short movies of... well, I won't spoil the surprise. Go tag some art and see for yourself.

Field Guide for Making Crowdsourcing Work

WNYC Labs has been working on an incredibly useful field guide to crowdsourcing. For the harried beginner, they offer 10 simple tips for getting started. Set the tone, and be an editor, is some of their advice, which is to say: Crowdsourcing doesn't have to mean that you turn over the microphone and walk away. Looking for advice on adapting your editorial process or hoping for some case studies? Done, and done. There is no secret sauce to crowdsourcing. No holy grail. But this field guide is the most comprehensive guide that I've seen.

I'd been planning to write something as well about the outcome of ProPublica's Super Bowl Blitz -- they asked readers to ask their representatives if they planned to be at the Super Bowl, and then request that they bring their cameras to the game. The only result worth reporting on so far seems to be that a handful of planned congressional super bowl parties were scrubbed or rebranded. Their reporting is worth a read if you don't think of the NFL as a major campaign donor (though it doesn't look like the crowd played a big role in reporting the story). I haven't asked ProPublica how they measured the impact the project had on reader engagement. If a group of readers who don't otherwise spend much time thinking about campaign finance suddenly decide they're heavily invested in campaign finance, maybe there's something to it. Hooking substantive news coverage to big sporting events is never an easy assignment.

February 07 2010

22:09

Real-time reactions to Super Bowl ads on Twitter

BrandBowl2010 — a new Super Bowl advertiser tracking site from Mullen and Radian 6 — offers near real-time analysis for an immediate look at pre-, post- and in-game Twitter reactions to the Super Bowl spots everyone will be watching, Mashable reports.

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