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January 07 2012

20:28

Times have changed. AOL's Silicon Valley Product Factory today

Business Insider :: AOL is changing the way it develops products in Silicon Valley, and some of the people there aren't happy about it. Two years ago, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong hired the guy who saved Yahoo email, Brad Garlinghouse, and told him to go forth and create new products. Armstrong even called Garlinghouse AOL's "CEO of Silicon Valley." 

An exciting time, but times have changed after AOL bought Huffington Post. 

Continue to read Nicholas Carlson, www.businessinsider.com

Tags: AOL Yahoo

January 03 2012

20:33

FT: Huffington Post targets global expansion

Financial Times :: The Huffington Post is aiming to double its global audience in the next two years through partnerships with newspapers that are still struggling to understand the web, according to the executive in charge of the website’s international expansion.

[Jimmy Maymann, AOL Huffington Post Media Group:] The international business needs to be as meaningful to Huffington Post as it is in the US

Continue to read Tim Bradshaw, www.ft.com

Tags: AOL Huffington

January 02 2012

19:16

Tim Armstrong: In 2012, we must be a culture centered on the principle of kaizen

"Continual improvement" in a business context usually means: cut costs, reduce inefficiencies, sell what's not profitable and focus on your strengths. Whatever that means in the context of AOL in 2012? We will see.

Capital New York :: AOL chief executive Tim Armstrong closed out 2011 with a 2,000-word motivational memo emailed to his several thousand staffers around 7 p.m. on New Year's Eve. One feature that was probably enough to put a damper on more than a few New Year's Eve plans was his emphasis on "kaizen," the principal of "continual improvement" that proliferated in postwar Japan. "In 2012, we must be a culture centered on the principle of kaizen, the practice of constant improvement—and that applies to all of our products as well as all of our corporate services," Armstrong wrote.

The full memo - Continue to read Joe Pompeo, www.capitalnewyork.com

Tags: AOL

December 18 2011

19:19

AOL's Patch will lose at least $100m this year and revenue is tiny

Business Insider :: AOL's local business, Patch, will lose at least $100 million this year and generate paltry revenues, according to documents we've obtained from a source. Analysts say that, during 2011, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong invested approx. $160 million into Patch, a network of 850 or local news blogs. His big bet was that AOL could, eventually, richly profit by filling one of the last remaining "white spaces" on the Internet by creating local content and selling local ads against it. 

How did the bet do this year?

Continue to read Nicholas Carlson, www.businessinsider.com

December 10 2011

18:11

Tom Stites: layoffs, cutbacks, and the new world of news deserts

Journalism as a public good? - No, I don't think so. Instead information is a public good and journalism is a transport protocol for how information will be transferred to "readers"; journalism forms a crucial part of a larger nervous system of a society, a part definitely essential for any society to stay healthy.

Niemanlab :: Isn’t it a crucial issue that a huge part of the American people, the less-than-affluent majority, is civically malnourished due to the sad state of U.S. journalism — and that the nation’s broad electorate is thus all but certainly ill informed? It has long troubled me, and many others, that an issue so central to democracy has such a peripheral role in the discourse about journalism’s future, which tends to focus more on crowdsourcing, Twitter and Facebook, aggregation vs. original reporting, how AOL is faring with Patch, and search engine optimization. These are important topics, but

[Tom Stites:] ... perhaps an energizing frame like “news desert” can widen the aperture of thinking about journalism’s future and sharpen the focus on people’s and democracy’s needs — on journalism as public good.

Continue to read Tom Stites, www.niemanlab.org

September 19 2011

19:25

Is content the problem or the solution? Michael Wolff: the Internet needs showmen

AdWeek :: The ever-mounting disarray at Yahoo, along with the not-so-far-behind-it disarray at AOL, is just another part of the long-in-coming conclusion that content doesn’t work as a business online. “Content doesn’t work” means, in this context, that other businesses work better. 

And yet, there is content that works—that remains unique and that commands premium pricing. That’s television—or video. Put another way, what still works, what advertisers and audiences still seek, is superexpensive content. And there is a model in which mature non-content-producing businesses help themselves by becoming sophisticated content producers: the premium channel business.

Continue to read Michael Wolff, www.adweek.com

September 16 2011

19:58

A tech-industry punchline: can AOL and Yahoo come back to life?

Businessweek :: Shortly after the news broke that Yahoo! had ousted Chief Executive Carol Bartz on Sept. 6, Tim Armstrong’s phone began ringing. According to people with knowledge of the calls who were not authorized to speak on the record, the AOL CEO spoke several times that day with bankers who wanted to reopen talks begun in 2010 about merging the two companies under Armstrong’s leadership. The logic: By combining the companies’ content and audience, the former Google executive could extract better ad rates and build a more profitable business.

It’s a terrific idea—if you’re Armstrong or a fee-seeking investment banker. But the idea of merging these struggling Internet icons has become a tech-industry punchline.

Continue to read Peter Burrows, www.businessweek.com

18:57

Google's social push - Kara Swisher: "It's called Propeller"

AllThingsD :: According to numerous sources close to the situation, Google is indeed working on rolling out a new product, which is currently called Propeller. Sources said Propeller is apparently one of a number of new socially focused announcements Google is prepping, including new apps. Propeller is a souped-up version of similar reader apps such as Flipboard, AOL's Editions, Yahoo's Livestand, and Pulse.
Facebook is also making social versions of publications available within its site.

Continue to read Kara Swisher, allthingsd.com

15:30

This Week in Review: A unique paywall plan in Boston, and ethics at TechCrunch and the Times

Every Friday, Mark Coddington sums up the week’s top stories about the future of news.

Paid and free, side by side: The Boston Globe became the latest news organization to institute an online paywall this week, but it did so in an unprecedented way that should be interesting to watch: The newspaper created a separate paid site, BostonGlobe.com, to run alongside its existing free site, Boston.com. PaidContent has the pertinent details: A single price ($3.99 a week), and Boston.com gets most of the breaking news and sports, while BostonGlobe.com gets most of the newspaper content.

As the Globe told Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman, the two sites were designed with two different types of readers in mind: One who has a deep appreciation for in-depth journalism and likes to read stories start-to-finish, and another who reads news casually and briefly and may be more concerned about entertainment or basic information than journalism per se.

The first thing that caught many people’s attention was new site’s design — simple, clean, and understated. Tech blogger John Gruber gave it a thumbs-up, and news design guru Mario Garcia called it ”probably the most significant new website design in a long time.” The Lab’s Joshua Benton identified the biggest reasons it looks so clean: Far fewer links and ads.

Benton (in the most comprehensive post on the new site) also emphasized a less noticeable but equally important aspect of BostonGlobe.com’s design: It adjusts to fit just about any browser size, which reduces the need for mobile apps, making life easier for programmers and, as j-prof Dan Kennedy noted at the Lab, a way around the cut of app fees required by Apple and others. If the Globe’s people “have figured out a way not to share their hard-earned revenues with gatekeepers such as Apple and Amazon, then they will have truly performed a service for the news business — and for journalism,” Kennedy said.

Of course, the Globe could launch the most brilliantly conceived news site on the web, but it won’t be a success unless enough people pay for it. Poynter’s Sonderman (like Kennedy) was skeptical of their ability to do that, though as the Atlantic’s Rebecca Rosen pointed out, the Globe’s plan may be aimed as much at retaining print subscribers as making money off the web. The Washington Post’s Erik Wemple wondered if readers will find enough at BostonGlobe.com that’s not at Boston.com to make the site worth their money.

The TechCrunch conflict and changing ethical standardsLast week’s flap between AOL and TechCrunch over the tech site’s ethical conflicts came to an official resolution on Monday, when TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington parted ways with AOL, the site’s owner. But its full effects are going to be rippling for quite a while: Gawker’s Ryan Tate called the fiasco a black eye for everyone involved, but especially AOL, which had approved Arrington’s investments in some of the companies he covers just a few months ago. Fellow media mogul Barry Diller also ripped AOL’s handling of the situation.

At the Guardian, Dan Gillmor said that while he doesn’t trust TechCrunch much personally, it’s the audience’s job to sort out their trust with the help of transparency, rather than traditional journalism’s strictures. Others placed more of the blame on TechCrunch: Former Newsweek tech editor Dan Lyons said TechCrunch’s people should have expected this type of scenario when they sold to a big corporation, and media analyst Frederic Filloux said TechCrunch is a perfect example of the blogosphere’s vulnerability to unchecked conflicts of interest.

There was more fuel for those kinds of ethical concerns this week, as the winning company at TechCrunch’s annual Disrupt competition was one that Arrington invests in. But Arrington had an ethical accusation of his own to make at the conference, pointing out that the New York Times invests in a tech venture capital fund which has put $3.5 million into GigaOM, a TechCrunch competitor. Poynter’s Steve Myers detailed the Times’ run-ins between the companies it invests in and the ones it covers (and its spotty disclosure about those connections), concluding that even if the conflict is less direct than in blogging, it’s still worth examining more closely.

As it plunged further into its battle with TechCrunch late last week, AOL was also reported to be talking with Yahoo, which recently fired its CEO, about a merger between the two Internet giants. All Things Digital’s Kara Swisher said there’s no way the deal would actually happen; Wired’s Tim Carmody called it a “spectacularly crazy idea” and GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram agreed, while Business Insider reminded us that they said a year ago that AOL and Yahoo should merge.

Meanwhile, the New York Times’ David Carr homed in on the core problem that both companies are facing: The fact that people want information online from niche sites, not giant general-news portals. “As news surges on the Web, giant ocean liners like AOL and Yahoo are being outmaneuvered by the speedboats zipping around them, relatively small sites that have passionate audiences and sharply focused information,” he wrote.

Facebook opens to subscribers: It hasn’t gotten nearly as much attention as some of its other moves, but Facebook took another step in Twitter’s direction this week by introducing the Subscribe Button, which allows users to see other people’s (and groups’) status updates without friending or becoming a fan of them.

As GeekWire’s Monica Guzman and many others noted, Facebook’s “subscribe” looks a heck of a lot like Twitter’s “follow.” When asked about similar Google+ features at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference, a Facebook exec said it wasn’t a response to Google+.

Guzman said Facebook is putting down deeper roots by going beyond the limits of reciprocal friendship, and GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram pinpointed the reason why this could end up being a massive change for Facebook: It’s beginning to move Facebook from a symmetrical network to an asymmetrical one, which could fundamentally transform its dynamics. Still, Ingram said Twitter is much better oriented toward being an information network than Facebook is, even with a “Subscribe” button.

The change could have particularly interesting implications for journalists, as Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman explained in his brief outline of the feature. As he noted, it may eliminate the need for separate Facebook profiles and pages for journalists, and while Lost Remote’s Cory Bergman said that should be a welcome change for journalists who were trying to manage both, he noted that shows and organizations may want to stick with pages.

News Corp.’s scandal widens: An update on the ongoing scandal enveloping News Corp.: A group of U.S. banks and investment funds that own shares in News Corp. expanded a lawsuit to include allegations of stealing, hacking, and anti-competitive behavior by two of the company’s U.S. subsidiaries — an advertiser and a satellite TV hardware manufacturer. As the Washington Post’s Erik Wemple noted, these are old cases, but they’re getting fresh attention, and that’s how scandals gain momentum.

James Murdoch, the son of News Corp.’s Rupert Murdoch, was also recalled to testify again before members of Britain’s Parliament later this fall, facing new questions about the breadth of News Corp.’s phone hacking scandal. The Wall Street Journal examined the scandal’s impact on the elder Murdoch’s succession plan for the conglomerate, especially as it involves James. The company’s executives also announced this week that they’ve found tens of thousands of documents that could shed more light on the phone hacking cases.

Reading roundup: Here’s what else went on this week:

— The biggest news story this week, of course, is actually 10 years old: Here’s a look at how newspapers marked the anniversary of 9/11, how news orgs used digital technology to tell the story, and a reflection on how 9/11 changed the media landscape.

— Twitter introduced a new web analytics tool to measure Twitter’s impact on websites. Here’s an analysis from Mathew Ingram of GigaOM.

— At an academic conference last weekend, Illinois j-prof Robert McChesney repeated his call for public funding for journalism. Here are a couple of good summaries of his talk from fellow j-profs Axel Bruns and Alfred Hermida.

— Finally, here’s a relatively short but insightful two-part interview between two digital media luminaries, Henry Jenkins and Dan Gillmor, about media literacy, citizen journalism and Gillmor’s latest book. Should make for a quick, thought-provoking weekend read.

September 15 2011

20:46
18:19

Ad buyers on AOL-Microsoft-Yahoo deal: What's in it for us?

AdWeek :: Apparently applying the “enemy of my enemy is my friend” philosophy, AOL, Yahoo, and Microsoft are reportedly working on a deal to sell each other’s online advertising inventory. But ad buyers who would potentially buy that inventory said they don’t immediately see how the new scenario is in their best interest. “We have an ample opportunity to buy this kind of inventory,” said Dick Hurrelbrink, president of Minneapolis-based media agency company Compass Point Media. “If it’s essentially a joining together for their benefit, they’re going to have to demonstrate to us what the benefits are for us and our clients.”

Continue to read Ki Mae Heussner, www.adweek.com

15:00

The newsonomics of 1, 2, 3, 4

Editor’s Note: Each week, Ken Doctor — author of Newsonomics and longtime watcher of the business side of digital news — writes about the economics of news for the Lab.

Ah, the joys of print — and real world — serendipity.

Arriving in Berlin to speak at the annual Medienwoche, part of the IFA 2011 content-meets-tech conference, I took a post-flight stroll around my hotel. I picked up a Wired U.K. at a local newsstand (newsstands chock-full of magazines and newspapers seem ubiquitous in Germany, their big-city absence in America made more noticeable). It’s a good issue, exploring the top digital entrepreneurial hotspots across Europe, from a U.K. perspective.

Across from p. 82, my eye caught a house ad. It was selling all things Wired U.K., but selling them in a customer-centric way I hadn’t before seen. Reproduced below, you see how it focused on how customers may variously access Wired. It speaks “multi-platform,” “multimedia” and “news anywhere” much better than those compounded nouns (which, when you think of it, are starting to sound like multisyllabic German constructions).

It’s masterful in telling the reader simply, and with a bit of fun, what the Wired U.K. brand stands for, how you can pick your timeliness (now to annual), mode of ingestion (reading, listening, or attending conferences) and more.

In a second bit of terrestrial serendipity, it turned out that Wired U.K. Editor David Rowan was speaking at IFA two hours after my talk. He and his art director, Andrew Diprose, had already supplied a digital copy of the house ad. I told him how well I thought the ad captured a business model in the making, with a clear customer-centric approach. He thanked me for the comment, and added, “It’s just something we tossed together when we had an extra page.” Well, it may have been, but it shows how this Wired crew is thinking of their business, eating some of the digital dog food it dishes out in each issue.

The ad had particular resonance this week as I’ve been thinking about the question on everyone’s minds in the newspaper and magazine businesses: What’s the new business model — that hybrid print/digital or digital/print — going to look like? It’s clear to everyone at this point that while print has a significant role for as far forward as we can see, it’s receding in importance, and revenue, and that digital is the growth engine on which to focus.

It’s one thing to say that and quite another to say what the new business model will look like. How much revenue will come from what, when, and who?

Now approaching 2012, we see that 2011 has provided a few clues to that new business model. No one, though, even the world’s digital revenue news leader, Oslo-based Schibsted (with 30 percent of overall revenues driven by digital) will tell you that even the industry’s leader has not yet found a big, sustainable model able to support a large newsroom.

Let me propose a model I’m testing out, as we watch the rollicking developments in the industry. As paid digital-access plans roll out weekly, as Digital First becomes not just a catchphrase but a company, as tablet development moves to the front burner and as the TV business continues to outpace both newspapers and magazines, what are the common threads we can see?

It’s purposely a simplified, bare-bones structure. I call it the newsonomics of 1, 2, 3, 4 and welcome flesh to be added to the skeleton — and/or chiropractic adjustment as well.

It’s 1, 2, 3, 4, as in:

  • 1 brand
  • 2 major sources of revenue, advertiser and reader
  • 3 products: print, computer, and mobile
  • 4G, as in the coming of faster connectivity

Let’s look at each one, briefly:

1 brand

The first decade-plus of the web was all about collecting, bringing things together. That meant major wins (63 percent of U.S. digital ad revenue in 2011 is going to Google, Yahoo, AOL, Microsoft — and Facebook) for those who aggregated. The act of collecting (curating if you prefer) was rewarded at the expense of those being aggregated. Now, as we approach 2012, we’re seeing a major re-assertion of brand, and its primacy.

Steve Jobs’ tablet-launching assertion that search is so yesterday was part sales pitch, part prophecy. The app is nothing if not the re-ascendance of brand, encapsulated in a few pixels. These tiny apps — from ESPN, The Atlantic, Time, the Guardian, and Berliner Morgenpost to The Boston Globe, The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal — all convey new promise. That promise has found a business model — all-access — to accompany. After years of wandering in the wilderness of customer confusion and self-doubt, news companies are saying: “You know us, you know our brand; you value us. Pay us once and we’ll get you our stuff wherever, whenever, however you want it”. Call it “entertainment everywhere” or “news anywhere,” or “TV Everywhere,” major media are now re-training their core audiences to expect — and pay for — ubiquity.

News companies are following the lead of Netflix, HBO, and Comcast (Xfinity), all now basing their hybrid old world (TV/cable/post office) and new world (smartphone, tablet, computer, and connected TV) on the same simple idea. In the first digital decade, news and entertainment was atomized by aggregators, dis-branded, as readers and viewers often flipped through Google, YouTube, or Yahoo without knowing who actually produced news or entertainment.

Now, we see brand re-emerging to signal top-of-mind awareness — and to earn those one-click credit card payments. These are friendlier brands, attempting to leverage and master the new social curation of news and entertainment.

2 major sources of revenue, advertiser and reader

For that first decade plus of the web, news publishers relied on one revenue source — digital advertising. That’s been like wheeling into the future on a unicycle, lots of careening and too little forward progress. As publishers have taken a long-term view of the business, the conclusion from Arthur Sulzberger and Rupert Murdoch to Dallas’ Jim Moroney and Morris’ Michael Romaner has been the same: We have little hope of creating a successful digital business without robust digital reader revenue. Reader revenue doesn’t have to be mean only digital subscriptions. Schibsted and Australia’s Fairfax are pioneering “services,” with Schibsted’s story-aided weight-loss programs prototypical. Newbies Texas Tribune and MinnPost are showing how reader-attended events are moneymakers. The tablet will spawn lots of new one-off paid reader products.

And advertising doesn’t mean just selling space. Most major news chains, from Advance to Gannett to Hearst, are becoming regional ad agencies, selling and re-selling everything from deals to Yahoo (or in Advance’s case, Microsoft) to search engine marketing to Facebook and Google to local merchants large and small. The New York Times pulled Lincoln “ad” money into digital circulation push. Sponsorships are coming back in a big way for mobile.

So, two revenues, tried, true, but twisting new. Will they be 50/50 supports of new models? Too early to say, but they provide us the rivers and tributaries to build new revenue stream models.

3 products: print, computer, and mobile

“Online,” of course, was first re-purposed print. Too much of mobile is, again, re-purposed online. Yet, the smarter all-access players, mostly national, are looking at their audience data and seeing how different usage is by device or platform. There are new products — MediaNews’ TapIn is emblematic — that are made for the tablet, with even smartphone utility in question and desktop a distant third. We’ll see three distinct ways of thinking about product: print, lean-forward desktop/laptop and lean-back tablet/on-the-move smartphone. Newspaper print becomes just another platform. This triad becomes more than a smart way to think about product development — it becomes a way of measuring costs, revenues, and metrics like ARPU.

4G, as in the coming of faster connectivity

Only in the last couple of years have we passed 50 percent broadband access in the U.S., which currently ranks ninth worldwide at 63 percent of households. We’ve forgotten the days when pressing on the play button on a website’s video player was a crapshoot. Between buffering and bumbling of all sorts, video only sometimes worked. Now, take a look at the just-launched WSJ Live on the iPad, and you see how far we’ve come. 4G is now on the mainstream horizon, and with it comes the higher valuing of news video. That’s a challenge for text-based newspaper companies, most of whom have taken only first steps to becoming truly multimedia companies. You can see the 4G glow in the eyes of John Paton’s new Digital First Media company. I’m told his New Haven Register now outproduces the local TV stations in digital video news creation; few newspaper peers can yet say the same. With ad rates for news video are still markedly higher than for text stories, any successful model must put video at the center of new products.

So, it’s 1, 2, 3 and 4, good tests of evaluating new company strategies — from the inside or out.

September 14 2011

09:06

AOL Tech expands direct ad sales cooperation with isocket

isocket :: Isocket announces that AOL Tech, the parent group of TechCrunch, is launching additional properties on isocket and buyads.com. As you may recall, popular blog TechCrunch was Isocket's very first publisher. When AOL bought TechCrunch about a year ago some people questioned what would happen with isocket. AOL Tech's decision to expand the cooperation with isocket can be seen an indicator of the success of direct ad sales for TechCrunch. 

Continue to read Ryan Hupfer, blog.isocket.com

August 03 2011

16:32

How AOL’s Editions iPad app aims to be anything to anyone

Poynter :: AOL unveiled a centerpiece of its mobile content strategy this week — a new iPad app called Editions that blends some of the most-successful features of other popular news-browsing apps with its own new ideas. Editions is another attempt at a mass-market iPad news app, like Flipboard, Pulse or Zite, that bring you news not just from one source or niche, but from the entire Web. They aim to be anything to anyone.

Review - continue to read Jeff Sondnerman, www.poynter.org

July 30 2011

10:44

Arianna Huffington's carte blanche and AOL's vanishing video strategy

Digiday Daily :: When AOL acquired The Huffington Post in February, Arianna Huffington was given carte blanche over the company’s entire editorial strategy. Since that time, video seems to be nearly forgotten at AOL. The company has failed to execute on the ambitious original Web video content plans laid out in the pre-Arianna era. That’s despite a booming online video ad market and increasing appetite for Web video among consumers.

What’s Arianna’s video strategy?

Continue to read Mike Shields, www.digidaydaily.com

July 23 2011

07:39

The fall of Bebo and rise of Google+, email as a social’s secret weapon

Betabeat :: Much like the marriage of Myspace and News Corp, AOL and Bebo failed to produce positive synergies for either party. The company was eventually sold for an embarrassing $10 million in 2010. Fred Wilson: “The sad thing was, we had a social network sitting under our noses the whole time, called AIM.

Like Google, AOL had a base of more than 100 million users who went each day to their inbox and chat windows to communicate with friends, family and co-worker. But the company never threw significant muscle behind to evolve its massive homegrown user base from email/chat. Google+ on the other hand will be a lasting success. Its initial momentum is due in large part to the fact that it relies on email/chat at its core.

Continue to read www.betabeat.com

July 09 2011

07:57

Display advertising - Yahoo, AOL homepage ad gains appear to stall

paidContent :: Although display advertising growth is as strong as ever, efforts to draw more advertisers to lucrative homepage ads fell flat in Q2 compared to Q1, according to a research note from Macquerie analyst Ben Schachter, who’s been providing a twice-quarterly rundown of landing page ad activity at the top portals and YouTube for the past year. Part of the reasons for the general slowdown in homepage ad growth is due to the mixed results for two of the most aggressive sellers of homepage ads, AOL and Yahoo, during the quarter.

Continue to read David Kaplan, paidcontent.org

June 18 2011

17:22

Panic attacks, auditory hallucinations, writing for a content mill. No, not this one, it's AOL

The Faster Times An experience report: "I was given eight to ten article assignments a night, writing about television shows that I had never seen before. AOL would send me short video clips, ranging from one-to-two minutes in length — clips from “Law & Order,” “Family Guy,” “Dancing With the Stars,” the Grammys, and so on and so forth… My job was then to write about them in twenty-five minutes. But really, my job was to lie. ... I had panic attacks; we all did."

AOL has a plan. The plan involves the future; and the future, oddly enough, involves writing. But what does it mean to write without freedom?

Continue to read Oliver Miller, thefastertimes.com

AOL's Master plan - a leaked Powerpoint presentation www.businessinsider.com

June 17 2011

12:38

AOL’s regrouped advertising.com is a $500m business

TechCrunch :: Advertising.com Group is a new business unit inside AOL, which includes six separate products: The Advertising.com ad-serving network acquired in 2004) and AdTech, along with more recent acquisitions 5Min, Pictela, GoViral, and the internally built Seed product. (AOL also owns TechCrunch, which is a part of the Huffington Post Media Group). All of that, all together is a $500 million business, which is about a quarter of AOL’s total revenue. AOL is trying to become the ad network for premium brands across the Web.

Continue to read Erick Schonfeld, techcrunch.com

June 12 2011

16:34

How's life? Inside Huffington Post-AOL, territory's marked

Gawker :: Sure, we'd heard there was a civil war at AOL following the Huffington Post merger. But we never imagined we'd be hearing tales quite so evocative of schoolyard bullying. Team HuffPo is apparently the meanest clique at AOL Junior High. "She steals people's lunches," read one of the first emails to Gawker's inbox after we asked for stories from inside the merger earlier this week. And that was an AOL journalist's summary of new boss Arianna Huffington.

Continue to read Ryan Tate, gawker.com

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