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December 06 2011

22:50

Last Call for Entries for the 2012 Vodafone Americas Foundation Wireless Innovation Project & mHealth Alliance Award

December 31 Deadline Rapidly Approaching for Competition with $650,000 in Cash and Prizes for Wireless and mHealth Solutions



The Vodafone Americas Foundation and mHealth Alliance announced the last call for submissions for the annual Vodafone Americas Foundation Wireless Innovation Project™ and the mHealth Alliance Award, a competition designed to spark innovation and help solve pressing global issues. Proposals will be accepted through December 31.



"So far, we’ve received very unique and exciting solutions, and we’re encouraged by the caliber of the applicants who have submitted proposals," said June Sugiyama, Director of the Vodafone Americas Foundation. "This is the next generation of wireless innovation that can make a critical impact for problems facing millions of people around the globe.”



The Vodafone Americas Foundation™ launches the Wireless Innovation Project™ annually with a partnership with the mHealth Alliance. There is over $650,000 worth of prizes for solutions in the fields of education, health, access to communication, economic development, and the environment. Winners will acquire vast recognition as the frontrunners of a national competition. The partnership with the Vodafone Americas Foundation will last for three years following the presentation of the award.



Projects should be global in scope and must be at a stage of research where an advanced prototype or field/market test can occur during the award period. Proposals are due December 31, 2011, and winners will be announced at the Global Philanthropy Forum in April 2012. 



If you or someone you know is interested in applying, you can begin the application process at http://project.vodafone-us.com/application/questionnaire.php. Details about eligibility, the application, information on past winners and more can be found at project.vodafone-us.com. More information about the mHealth Alliance and its work can be found at mhealthalliance.org.




ABOUT the Vodafone Americas Foundation™
Vodafone Americas Foundation™ is part of Vodafone’s global network of foundations. It is affiliated with Vodafone Group Plc, the world's leading mobile telecommunications company, with ownership interests in more than 30 countries and Partner Markets in more than 40 countries. As of March 31, 2011, Vodafone had approximately 370 million proportionate customers worldwide. In the U.S., the foundation directs its philanthropic activities towards the San Francisco Bay and the Metro Denver Areas where most Vodafone employees live and work, and where it strives to make a positive and enduring impact on the community. The Foundation is driven by a passion for the world around us. It makes grants that help people in the community and around the world lead fuller lives.
 


ABOUT the mHealth Alliance
The mHealth Alliance champions the use of mobile technologies to improve health throughout the world. Working with diverse partners to integrate mHealth into multiple sectors, the Alliance serves as a convener for the mHealth community to overcome common challenges by sharing tools, knowledge, experience, and lessons learned. The mHealth Alliance advocates for more and better quality research and evaluation to advance the evidence base; seeks to build capacity among health and industry decision-makers, managers, and practitioners; promotes sustainable business models; and supports systems integration by advocating for standardization and interoperability of mHealth platforms. The mHealth Alliance also hosts HUB (Health Unbound), a global online community for resource sharing and collaborative solution generation. Hosted by the United Nations Foundation, and founded by the Rockefeller Foundation, Vodafone Foundation, and UN Foundation, the Alliance now also includes PEPFAR, HP, the GSM Association, and NORAD among its founding partners. For more information, visit www.mhealthalliance.org.

September 15 2011

09:44

Daily mail student media awards?

Yeah, wouldn’t happen. But should it?

The always interesting Wannabehacks posted yesterday stating that The industry isn’t doing enough to support student journalists. The post really should have been titled The Guardian isn’t doing enough to support student journalists as it takes a pop at the frankly risible prize the Guardian is offering for its Guardian student media award:

[T]he quality of prizes has diminished year on year: “Seven weeks of placement with expenses paid (offered 2003-2006) is a good way to spend the summer. Two weeks of self-funded work experience is an insult to supposedly the best student journalists in Britain.”

It’s a fair point. Just how good you have to be to actually be paid to work at the Guardian?

Maybe we are being unfair to the Guardian though. Why do they need to carry this stuff? I know plenty of students who don’t want to work for the Guardian. So why don’t more papers step up? If it’s about spotting talent then shouldn’t every media org have a media award?

Truth is there is a bit of black hole out there when it comes to awards. Aspiring journos could be forgiven for thinking that there is very little on offer between that letter writing competition the local paper runs for schoolkids and the Guardian awards. There are actually quite a few – the NUS student awards for example. But none with the direct association of the Guardian awards.

But maybe it’s not about the award. The wannabe hacks post (and the letter it references) suggests that there is more a problem of expectation here.

The Guardian is a very attractive proposition to many aspiring journos. In a lot of respects it plays on that strength; it presents itself as a like the paper where things are happening. But there is a danger that things like competitions exploit that aspiration and begin to suggest a slightly dysfunctional relationship - aspiring journos trying their best to please the indifferent and aloof object of their affection.

Show them the money.

This isn’t just a print problem. The truth is the industry has a bit of problem of putting its money where it’s mouth is when it comes to student journos.

As an academic I see more offers of valuable experience than paid opportunities in my inbox. They tend to coincide with large events where industry doesn’t have the manpower to match their plans for coverage. In that sense there is no secret here, the industry is living beyond its means and it’s increasingly relying on low and no paid input to keep newsrooms running. But student journo’s bear the brunt of that. Yes, they get experience, but not much else.

No return on investment

Of course the flip-side to that argument is that many of those who enter the competitions would happily benefit from the association but don’t put back in. I wonder how many people who enter the Guardian student media awards have regularly bought the paper rather than accessing the (free) website?  You could argue the same when talking about work experience. How many students actually buy the product they aspire to work on?

But the reality is that, regardless of how much is put in, if you court an audience, you have to live up to their expectations – unreasonable or otherwise.

This is happening at a time when those same newsrooms are reporting on the commercial realities of education and how students need to demand value from their investment. As someone trying to respond to those expectations, perhaps I can offer some advice.  Perhaps the industry need to reflect on their advice to prospective students the next time they reach out or connect with student journalists.  Just how much are you expecting them to invest in your newsroom and what’s the return?

 

March 30 2011

14:20

NetSquared Local Organizer Judy Hallman Wins NTEN Lifetime Achievement Award

Join us in congratulating the NCTech4Good - NetSquared Local Organizer, Judy Hallman, on winning the NTEN Lifetime Achievement Award!

The award was presented to Judy at the 2011 Nonprofit Technology Conference by Paula Jones, Director of Technology and Administration for the North Carolina Center for Nonprofits.

Each year, NTEN recognizes a member of the community who have furthered the work of the nonprofit technology field through dedication, innovation, and leadership.  This year they have decided to honor Judy Hallman for her work. Judy's career has been devoted to bringing technology in to further social causes. After retiring from the UNC-Chapel Hill, where she helped introduce the university to the Internet, Judy became engaged in a project designed to create a digital bulletin board service for the local community. Apart from co-organizing the NCTech4Good - NetSquared Local Judy currently volounteers with the Public Information Network (aka RTPnet).

 

Join us in congratulating Judy by commenting on this post!

July 22 2010

15:25

European Commission launches 18th annual Lorenzo Natali Prize

Journalists are invited to take part in the annual Lorenzo Natali Prize, organised by the European Commission.

The international contest, now in its 18th year, will reward the work of print, radio and television journalists from the following regions: Africa;  Asia and Pacific;  Latin America and the Caribbean; Europe; and the Arab World and Middle East.

Entrants must submit one extract or entire journalistic work tackling issues in development, democracy and human rights in the developing world. The work must have been printed or aired between 1 July 2009 and 30 June 2010.

There will be a grand prize of €5000 for the overall winner, and runner-up prizes of €2500 and €1500

An awards ceremony will be organised for the winners by the European Commission in Brussels in December.

See the full guidelines for the contest at this link.

See guidelines for entering the contest at this link.

Deadline for submissions is August 31.Similar Posts:



June 30 2010

09:03

Enter your Org's Taglines to win a Taggie Award

Taggie Award LogoSince 2008, the Nonprofit Tagline Awards (aka the Taggies) have been rewarding organizations for using strong taglines in their marketing materials. A powerful tagline can be the centerpiece of a strong marketing campaign, and can serve to both clarify and simplify your message. Does your nonprofit have an organizational tagline or a tagline for a campaign, program, or event? If so, enter to win a Taggie Award from Getting Attention.

The Taggie Awards:

The deadline for entering is July 28. The form takes about 3 minutes to fill in, so why not do it right now?

read more

June 07 2010

15:45

Shortlist announced for Mind Journalist of the Year 2010

Mental health charity Mind has announced the shortlist for its annual media awards. The prizes, which commend excellence in reporting on mental health issues, include journalist of the year and student journalist of the year.

Those nominated are as follows – the comments on individuals come from Mind’s awards team:

Mind Journalist of the Year Award
Edward Davie, British Medical Association News
“Edward Davie submitted a series of articles on the issue of private healthcare providers refusing to treat NHS patients with psychiatric conditions. Davie’s articles were noteworthy for the depth of personal investigation involved and the clarity with which he highlighted this tricky area.”

Nick Morrison, the Times Educational Supplement
“Nick Morrison demonstrates a deep understanding of stress and mental well-being at work in a feature on the mental health of teaching professionals. Packed with first-hand experiences of teachers from all walks of life, this honest account is a wake up call for the education sector.”

Alexi Mostrous & Ben Macintyre, the Times
“In a frank and exposing article Alexi Mostrous and Ben Macintyre investigate mental health problems such as post-traumatic stress disorder among current and former soldiers, and present revealing insights from ex-service personnel who have experienced mental distress.”

Barry Nelson, the Northern Echo
“Local journalist Barry Nelson writes on topics ranging from stigma and PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder] to the use of art therapy as a mental health treatment, showing the many ways in which mental health can impact upon people’s lives both directly and indirectly.”

Deborah Orr, the Guardian/G2
“Deborah Orr recounts her experiences shadowing professionals involved in sectioning patients under the Mental Health Act, producing a sobering take on the challenges faced daily by mental health workers and the realities surrounding the process of admission to psychiatric care.”

Max Pemberton, the Evening Standard and the Daily Telegraph
“Max Pemberton’s columns explore the stigma and misunderstanding that still persists around mental health. A doctor as well as a journalist, Pemberton presents different perspectives and incites readers to think differently about how subtle mental health discrimination can sometimes be.”

Patrick Strudwick, the Independent
“In an in-depth investigative feature into the world of straight-to-gay conversions where homosexuality is seen as a mental health problem, Patrick Strudwick challenges the reader with controversial questions such as whether tighter regulation of counsellors and psychotherapists is necessary to protect the public from abuse at the hands of therapists.”

Student Journalist Award
Jennie Agg, Student direct Mancunion (University of Manchester)

Daniella Graham, Gairrhydd (Cardiff University)

Laura Mackenzie, Leeds Student (Leeds University)

Adam Walmesley, Exeposé (University of Exeter)

Similar Posts:



March 30 2010

11:33

Awesome Prison Break Episodes:Using innovative technology

 

Watching Prison Break episodes is identical to taking a roller coaster ride. The fantastic episodes of the show take us to an adventurous trip and we enjoy thrilling experience. In this real world everything seems out of reach until we put our best endeavors. But we find utopia in the show that mesmerizes the most. As the show has gone off air, now the hardcore tv show fans of this tv show find the internet, an easy and prominent doorway to download and watch  Prison Break episodes.

 

read more

February 25 2010

07:58

Not interest in hyperlocal that scales

I’m not interested in “hyperlocal” journalism that scales.  These start-up, disruptive sites have their best chance at success if they are locally run and locally owned.

Catching up with feeds, as you do, I finally got chance to read Brian Cubbison’s Q & A with Howard Owens about his award winning online news service The Batavian.

Howard is a US newspaper exec and long time advocate of the web, journalism and their combined disruptive power; I have an image of Howard in a t-shirt with the slogan ‘I’m disruptive’ on it.

Obviously the quote I picked chimed with me and my thoughts about hyperlocal only having to be ‘big enough’. But the whole  interview makes for interesting reading and offers some useful insight in to his approach.

Go and have a look.

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