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January 18 2012

21:11

Leveson inquiry hears regional newspaper editors face tough ad market

Guardian :: Advertising in regional newspapers has almost halved over the past five years, the editor of the South Wales Evening Post has told the Leveson inquiry. Revenue from recruitment advertising, the lifeblood of local papers, has fallen dramatically because of rising unemployment and competition from the internet, regional editors told the inquiry today.

Continue to read Lisa O'Carroll, www.guardian.co.uk

January 04 2012

18:00

Business journalism: Steve Doig offers tips of efficient data use

Business Journalism :: Steve Doig, the Knight Chair in Computer-Assisted Journalism at Arizona State University, shared his tips of effectively using data in financial coverage with Reynolds business journalism professor fellows Tuesday. The veteran Miami Herald reporter and editor said both professors and students should build a “data state of mind,” because accurate and meaningful numbers are vital for quality business journalism. Doig introduced useful tools, math formula, websites, etc.

What he recommends - Continue to read Tian Chen, businessjournalism.org

July 27 2011

18:40

A dilemma - How should an advertorial look like, that works as a business?

Niemanlab :: For many journalists there’s something halting to the phrase, let alone the idea, of an “advertorial publication.” After all, advertorials are something of a boogeyman (but a boogeyman with a checkbook, which is nice) in the straight-journalism world, products that look, walk, and talk like news content — but that are, in reality, advertising. They play into all the deep-seated feelings journalists generally don’t like to acknowledge about how the bills are paid and about the tricky relationship between advertising and news.

[Justin Ellis:] But if you stripped away the pretense and assumptions to focus on how an advertorial publication would work as a business, what would it look like?

Continue to read Justin Ellis, www.niemanlab.org

July 26 2011

02:32

May 30 2011

11:42

Harvard Business Review - one and a half year later reinvention is paying off

New York Times :: Shortly after editors at the Harvard Business Review tore up their magazine in 2009, adding pictures to the cover, reader comments to their signature case studies and colorful illustrations — the horror! — cranky reader comments started coming in. But a year and a half later, the magazine’s editors say that worries about alienating its readers have proved unfounded.

[Adi Ignatius, editor of the Harvard Business Review Group] Newsstand is way up, renewals are way up, advertising is way up. And it’s not a situation where a rising tide lifts all boats.

Continue to read Jeremy W. Peters, mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com

April 22 2011

14:00

This Week in Review: The Flipboard dilemma, Trove and News.me arrive, and a paywall number for the NYT

Every Friday, Mark Coddington sums up the week’s top stories about the future of news.

Is Flipboard a competitor or collaborator?: Flipboard has quickly become one of the hottest news apps for the iPad, and it continued its streak last week when it announced it had raised $50 million in funding. Flipboard’s Mike McCue told All Things Digital’s Kara Swisher he’d be using the money to hire more staff and expand onto other devices, including the iPhone and Android platform. But he also talked to TechCrunch about using the money to fend off a rumored competitor in development at Google. (The Houston Chronicle’s Dwight Silverman told Google not to bother, because Zite already does the trick for him.)

All this prompted a fantastic analysis of Flipboard from French media consultant Frederic Filloux, who explained why Flipboard’s distinctive user-directed blend of news media sites, RSS feeds, and social media is so wonderful for users but so threatening to publishers. Filloux argued that every media company should be afraid of Flipboard because they’ve built a superior news-consumption product for users, and they’re doing it on the backs of publishers. But none of those publishers can complain about Flipboard, because any of them could have (and should have) invented it themselves.

GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram advised media companies to be willing to work with Flipboard for a similar “if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em” reason: Its app has their apps beat in terms of customizability and usability, so they’re better off trying to make money off of it than their own internal options. ReadWriteWeb’s Dan Rowinski wrote about the possibility that Flipboard could be a better alternative partner for publishers than Apple, and Marshall Kirkpatrick wondered why publishers are up in arms about Flipboard in the first place.

Traditional media’s personalized news move: One of the reasons that media companies might be less than willing to work with Flipboard is that some of them are building their own personalized news aggregation apps, two of which launched this week: The Washington Post Co.’s Trove and Betaworks’ News.me, developed with the New York Times. INFOdocket’s Gary Price has the best breakdown of what Trove does: It uses your Facebook account and in-app reading habits to give you personalized “channels” of news, determined by an algorithm and editors’ picks — a bit of the “Pandora for news” idea, as the Post’s Don Graham called it. (It’s free, so it’s got that going for it, which is nice.)

All Things Digital’s Peter Kafka suspected that Trove will be most useful on mobile media, as its web interface won’t be much different from many people’s current personalized home pages, and David Zax of Fast Company emphasized the social aspect of the service.

News.me is different from Trove in a number of ways: It costs 99 cents a week, and it’s based not on your reading history, but on what’s showing up in other people’s Twitter streams. (Not just what they’re tweeting, but what they’re reading — Betaworks’ John Borthwick called it reading “over other people’s shoulders.”) It also pays publishers based on the number of people who read their content through the app. That’s part of the reason it’s gotten the blessing of some media organizations that aren’t typically aggregator friendly, like the Associated Press. [Note: We're one of the publishers licensed in the app. —Ed.]

Since News.me is based so heavily on Twitter, it raises the obvious question of whether you’d be better off just getting your news for free from Twitter itself. That’s what Business Insider’s Ellis Hamburger wondered, and Gizmodo’s Adrian Covert isn’t a fan, though Martin Bryant of The Next Web said it could be helpful in stripping out the chatter of Twitter and adding an algorithmic aspect. GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram looked at both services and concluded that they signal a willingness by some traditional media outlets to adjust their longtime broadcasting role to the modern model of the “Daily Me.”

A good sign for the Times’ pay plan: The overall news from the New York Times Co.’s quarterly earnings report this week wasn’t good — net income is down 57 percent from a year ago — but there was one silver lining for online paid-content advocates: More than 100,000 people have begun paying for the Times’ website since it began charging for access last month. (That number doesn’t include those who got free subscriptions via Lincoln, but it does include those who are paying though cheaper introductory trials.)

As Advertising Age’s Nat Ives pointed out, there’s a lot that number doesn’t tell us about traffic and revenue (particularly, as paidContent’s Staci Kramer noted, how many people are paying full price for their subscriptions), but several folks, including Glynnis MacNicol of Business Insider, were surprised at how well the Times’ pay plan is doing. (Its goal for the first year was 300,000 subscribers.) Here at the Lab, Josh Benton looked back at the numbers for the Times’ TimesSelect paywall and concluded that an initial influx of subscribers doesn’t guarantee continued growth after launch.

Those numbers are particularly critical for the Times given the difficulty its company has had over the past several years — as Katie Feola of Adweek wrote, many analysts believe the pay plan is crucial for the Times’ financial viability. “But this means the paper’s future rests on an untested model that many experts believe can’t work in the oversaturated news market,” she wrote. “And the Times has to pray the ad market won’t decline faster than analysts predict.”

A few other paid-content tidbits: Nine of Slovakia’s largest news organizations put up a paywall together this week, and the pope is apparently pro-paywall, too. At the Guardian, Cory Doctorow mused about how companies can (and can’t) get people to pay for the content online in an age of piracy.

Google’s hammer falls on eHow: When Google applied its algorithm adjustment last month to crack down on content farms, Demand Media’s eHow actually came out better off (though others didn’t fare so well, like the New York Times Co.’s About.com, as we found out this week). Google made a second round of updates last week, and eHow got nailed this time, losing 66 percent of its Google juice, according to Sistrix.

Search Engine Land’s Matt McGee speculated that Google might have actually been surprised when eHow benefited the first time, and may have made this tweak in part as an effort to “correct” that. Demand Media, meanwhile, called Sistrix’s eHow numbers “significantly overstated,” though the company’s stock hit a new low on Monday. Mathew Ingram said investors have reason to worry, as Demand’s success seems to be at the mercy of Google’s every algorithm tweak.

A Pulitzer first: The Pulitzer Prizes were announced this week, and while the awards were spread pretty broadly among several news organizations, there were a couple of themes to note. As Felix Salmon and others pointed out, an abnormally large share of the awards went to business journalism, a trend the Columbia Journalism Review’s Dean Starkman opined on in a bit more detail.

The biggest prize from a future-of-news perspective may have gone to ProPublica, whose series on some of the machinations that worsened the financial crisis was the first Pulitzer winner to never appear in print. The Lab’s Justin Ellis noted that other winners are including significant multimedia components, perhaps signaling a shift in the emphasis of one of journalism’s most elite institutions. If you were wondering where WikiLeaks was in all this, well, the New York Times apparently didn’t submit its WikiLeaks-based coverage.

Reading roundup: No huge stories this week, but a few little things that are worth noting:

— Your weekly AOL/Huffington Post update: Jonathan Tasini came out swinging again regarding his lawsuit on behalf of unpaid HuffPo bloggers, Business Insider’s Glynnis MacNicol responded in kind, Eric Snider told the story of getting axed from AOL’s now-defunct Cinematical blog, and HuffPo unveiled features allowing readers to follow topics and writers.

— Missouri j-school students are chafing against requirements that they buy an iPad (they previously had to buy an iPod touch, and they called that plan a bust). Meanwhile, Ben LaMothe of 10,000 Words had three ideas of social media skills that j-schools should teach.

— A weird little fake-URL spoof turned into an interesting discussion about the possibility of libel through fake URLs, in thoughtful posts by both the Lab’s Andrew Phelps and TechCrunch’s Paul Carr.

— Two interesting data points on news innovation: A group led by Daniel Bachhuber put together some fascinating figures about and perspectives from Knight News Challenge grant recipients. And journalism researchers Seth Lewis and Tanja Aitamurto wrote at the Lab about news organizations using open API as a sort of external R&D department.

October 19 2010

09:38

Scraperwiki/RBI launch first in-house Hacks & Hackers event – for B2Bs

Tickets are now available for a Scraperwiki hack day at Reed Business Information (RBI) on Monday 29th November in Quadrant House, Surrey, from 8am (registration) – 8.30pm.

B2B journalists, developers and designers are invited to attend the one-day ‘Hacks and Hackers’ event hosted and sponsored by RBI, B2B publisher of titles including FlightGlobal, Farmers Weekly and New Scientist.

The idea is that business journalists and bloggers (‘Hacks’) pair up with computer programmers and designers (‘Hackers’) to produce innovative data projects in the space of one day. Food and drink will be provided throughout the event. Prizes for the best projects will be awarded in the evening.

Any journalist from a B2B background, or developer/designer with an interest in business journalism is welcome to attend. We’re especially keen to welcome people who are interested in producing data visualisations.

“Data journalism is an important area of development for our editorial teams in RBI,” said Karl Schneider, RBI editorial development director:

“It’s a hot topic for all journalists, but it’s particularly relevant in the B2B sector. B2B journalism is focused on delivering information that it’s audience can act on, supporting important business decisions.

“Often a well-thought-out visualisation of data can be the most effective way of delivering critical information and helping users to understand key trends.

“We’re already having some successes with this kind of journalism, and we think we can do a lot more. So building up the skills of our editorial teams in this area is very important.”

The event is the first in-house hack day that Scraperwiki has organised as part of its UK and Ireland Hacks & Hackers tour.

5o places are available in total: half for RBI staff; half for external attendees. People wishing to attend should select the relevant ticket at this link.

Past hacks and hackers days have run in London, Liverpool, Birmingham and Manchester. For a flavour of the projects please see this blog post.

If you have any questions please contact Aine McGuire via Aine [at]scraperwiki.com.

August 19 2010

10:35

Bloomberg to begin hiring in Washington DC for new policy news wire

Financial news wire Bloomberg will be creating jobs for more than 100 journalists and analysts in Washington DC with the release of its new policy news service Bloomberg Government, according to a report by the Reynolds Center for Business Journalism.

The resource, which is currently in development stages, advertises itself as “a customized resource for professionals who need to understand the business implications of government actions in real time”.

This comprehensive, subscription-based, online tool collects best-in-class data, provides high-end analysis and analytic tools, and delivers deep, reliable, quick and unbiased reporting from a team of more than 2,300 journalists and multimedia specialists worldwide. It also offers news aggregated from thousands of the top trusted news sources from around the globe.

Those interested in filling the new roles will need to be data-focused and able to combine reporting skills with policy information analysis, a spokeswoman told the Reynolds Center.Similar Posts:



July 16 2010

10:54

Finance story leads from the banking crisis – some tips for journalists

On the Reynolds Center for Business Journalism site journalist Jodi Schneider from the American Banker, has some tips for financial journalists looking for local banking stories in the aftermath of the credit crisis .

For local publications, community banks are a good source of stories and a way to localise the financial services story playing out on the national and world stage.

While her advice focuses on American processes, the general ideas could be adapted for the UK banking scene.

Story tips include: looking at other areas of a local economy which are suffering and how they may impact on local financial institutions; or investigating banks’ capital levels to predict whether they may be in danger of regulatory action.

More general advice covers what to include in any banking story, from the size of the institution and recent earnings, to capital standings and recent regulatory actions.

See the full post here…Similar Posts:



June 30 2010

12:50

CNBC, New York Times and Vanity Fair recognised at US business journalism awards

Winners of the US-based business journalism awards, the Gerald Loeb Awards, were announced yesterday, with CNBC, the New York Times and Vanity Fair each claiming two awards.

New York Times assistant investigative editor Walt Bogdanich was given the Lifetime Achievement Award, while chief mergers and acquisitions reporter, Andrew Ross Sorkin was awarded a Loeb for his book, ‘Too Big to Fail’.

The awards were established in 1957 by Gerald Loeb, to honour journalists who contribute to the understanding of business, finance and the economy.

See a full list of the winners and their entries here…Similar Posts:



April 14 2010

09:08

Felix Salmon: On business journalism and business blogging

Reuters’ business blogger Felix Salmon on the differences between journalism and blogging, and how this affects business reporting:

All too often, I fear, a “formal training in journalism” just means that journalists self-censor the good and funny bits of stories that bloggers naturally latch on to. What’s more, bloggers have a much more natural voice and personality than journalists do. So it’s only natural that bloggers will get more of a “following” than some guy who writes straight-down-the-line stories for the local newspaper.

Then, of course, there’s the very germane fact that many highly successful bloggers didn’t get a formal training in journalism because they were too busy getting a formal training in the thing they’re writing about – business, finance, economics.

Full post at this link….

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07:39

FT.com: Thomson Reuters’ video product Insider to launch on 11 May

Thomson Reuters is planning to launch a series of new web products and overhaul its markets division as part of plans to streamline the company and reach growing audiences of younger, web-savvy readers and smaller business customers.

Among the developments:

  • An “enterprise platform” offering faster delivery of data to clients and online training and customer service support to smaller customers;
  • The launch of online video product Insider on May 11, which it has been testing since last year;
  • A new desktop platform, Eikon, to launch in autumn, offering a wider range of data and personalisation features.

Full story at this link…

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March 15 2010

03:01

December 20 2009

06:16
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