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January 13 2012

18:41

What Do You Think About the Consumer Electronics Show (CES)?

Imagine 150,000 people from 140 countries wandering 1.6 million square feet of exhibit space in search of the latest whiz-bang flat-screen TV, tablet, smartphone or souped-up teched-out car. This is the International CES show in Las Vegas, which has mushroomed from 17,500 attendees in 1967 to the massive techno-hordes of today. This could be either your most incredible dream or a nightmare waiting to happen. Often, for tech journalists and bloggers, it ends up being both. So what's your take on CES? Have you attended and enjoyed what you experienced? Is it your idea of the 7th level of Hades? Vote in our poll (where you can choose multiple answers) and explain more in the comments below.


The Consumer Electronics Show is...

To hear more about CES, check out the latest edition of the Mediatwits podcast, with two tech journalists reporting from the conference floor.

P.S. From the CES website:

Products that Debuted at CES

Videocassette Recorder (VCR), 1970
Laserdisc Player, 1974

Camcorder, 1981

Compact Disc Player, 1981

Digital Audio Technology, 1990

Compact Disc - Interactive, 1991

Mini Disc, 1993

Radio Data System, 1993

Digital Satellite System, 1994

Digital Versatile Disk (DVD), 1996

High Definition Television (HDTV), 1998 Hard-disc VCR (PVR), 1999

Digital Audio Radio (DAR), 2000

Microsoft Xbox, 2001

Plasma TV, 2001

Home Media Server, 2002

HD Radio, 2003

Blu-Ray DVD, 2003

HDTV PVR, 2003

HD Radio, 2004

IP TV, 2005

An explosion of digital content services, 2006

New convergence of content and technology, 2007

OLED TV, 2008

3D HDTV, 2009

Tablets, Netbooks and Android Devices, 2010

Connected TV, Smart Appliances, Android Honeycomb, Ford's Electric Focus, Motorola Atrix, Microsoft Avatar Kinect, 2011

This is a summary. Visit our site for the full post ».

15:20

Mediatwits #33: CES Jumped the Shark?; SOPA Battles; Google+ in Search

Welcome to the 33rd episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali. This week we have a special show focused on the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) happening in Las Vegas all week. Apple isn't there and Microsoft did its last keynote presentation there. Is the show losing momentum? Are we all burned out on gadgets and flatter TVs? We talk to two tech journalists on the CES floor, Rob Pegoraro and TechDirt's Mike Masnick, about the various new TV sets, tablets and smartphones. Plus, Masnick gives us an update about how the CEA and many folks at the show are overwhelmingly opposed to the two anti-piracy bills, SOPA and PIPA, before Congress.

Meanwhile, search giant Google caused a stir by integrating Google+ much more deeply into its search results. The new "Search Plus Your World" has been criticized as unfairly giving Google+ an advantage over Twitter and Facebook in search results. Google responded by saying that it was upset that Twitter didn't renew its contract to be included in search results. Will this move bring more trouble to Google, with the Feds already investigating the company over privacy issues?

Check it out!

mediatwits33.mp3

Subscribe to the podcast here

Subscribe to Mediatwits via iTunes

Follow @TheMediatwits on Twitter here

Intro and outro music by 3 Feet Up; mid-podcast music by Autumn Eyes via Mevio's Music Alley.

Here are some highlighted topics from the show:

Intro

1:00: Background on the CES show

3:00: Journalists weary and tired of CES now?

4:00: The pain of CES

4:45: Rundown of topics on the show

Report from CES

portrait-with-cables.jpeg

5:15: Special guests from CES: Rob Pegoraro and Mike Masnick

6:10: How is this show different than previous shows?

7:50: Masnick: Thin TVs are impressive

10:40: Pegoraro: Color e-ink readers might boost e-readers

13:30: Masnick: Hard to see disruptive technology at first

CEA opposing SOPA

16:10: Many people at CES are opposing Stop Online Piracy Act, including Consumer Electronics Association

19:20: Why SOPA went too far

20:00: Pegoraro: History of greedy, restrictive bills put forward by entertainment industry

22:05: Masnick: When entertainment biz loses fights, they often still win

mike masnick hands.jpg

Google integrates Google+ in search

24:00: Mark gives background on move by Google

26:40: Why can't Google put social, private search in a new tab?

29:10: Facebook, Twitter are feeling left out of Google search

More Reading

CNET's Best of CES at CNET

CES XV at RobPegoraro.com

Tech Charms: Flying Cameras, Musical Purses at WSJ

Desperation Of SOPA/PIPA Supporters On Display At CES at TechDirt

Boo-Freaking-Hoo: RIAA Complains That 'The Deck Is Stacked' Against Them On CES Panels at TechDirt

Author of Controversial Piracy Bill Now Says 'More Study' Needed at WSJ Digits

Google's Results Get More Personal With Search Plus Your World at Search Engine Land

Is adding Google+ to search a red flag for regulators? at GigaOm

Search Plus Your World -- As Long As Its Our World at SearchBlog

Compete to Death or Cooperate to Compete? at SearchBlog

Weekly Poll

Don't forget to vote in our weekly poll, this time about the CES show:


The Consumer Electronics Show is...

Mark Glaser is executive editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He also writes the bi-weekly OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. He lives in San Francisco with his son Julian. You can follow him on Twitter @mediatwit. and Circle him on Google+

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January 09 2012

16:50

Daily Must Reads, Jan. 9, 2012

The best stories across the web on media and technology, curated by Nathan Gibbs


1. Walking while texting: A guide for safety and etiquette (New York Times)

2. Glam Media will test appetite for digital-media IPOs (Advertising Age)

3. CES loses clout as as industry shifts (New York Times)

4. How people watch TV online and off (TechCrunch)


Subscribe to our daily Must Reads email newsletter and get the links in your in-box every weekday!



Subscribe to Daily Must Reads newsletter

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January 07 2011

23:19

4 Minute Roundup: Is Consumer Electronics Show a Big Waste?

In this week's 4MR podcast, I consider the gargantuan Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. It offers an orgy of gadgets and new technology, but how much of it is worth our time and will become influential and game-changing? I talked with CNET editor at large Rafe Needleman, who is at CES this week, to get his defense of the show and how it's bringing in massive traffic for CNET.

Check it out!

4mrbareaudio1711.mp3

>>> Subscribe to 4MR <<<

>>> Subscribe to 4MR via iTunes <<<

Listen to my entire interview with Rafe Needleman:

rafermadness full.mp3

Background music is "What the World Needs" by the The Ukelele Hipster Kings via PodSafe Music Network.

Here are some links to related sites and stories for the podcast:

The Most Worthless Week in Tech at Slate

Special CES Coverage at CNET

Ford Unveils Focus Electric in New York and Las Vegas at the NY Times

@CES: Hollywood Digital Czars Rain On Smart TV Parade at PaidContent

Samsung Teams Up With Comcast, Time Warner, Hulu to Bring TV to Multiple Screens at AllThingsD

CES - Ultraviolet digital movie downloads to launch in mid-2011 at LA Times

Also, be sure to vote in our poll about how important CES is:




How important is the Consumer Electronics Show (CES)?customer surveys

Mark Glaser is executive editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He also writes the bi-weekly OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. He lives in San Francisco with his son Julian. You can follow him on Twitter @mediatwit.

This is a summary. Visit our site for the full post ».

May 18 2010

19:31

4 Reasons Why 3D TV Is Years Away From Adoption

After a multi-decade struggle, 3D is finally catching on in theatres.

It was a challenge for 3D movies to get where they are today, but I'd say the studios (and theater operators) are finally calling it a success. All the pieces have come together, spurred on by financial support of the infrastructure and much-needed exposure of the latest 3D technology thanks to "Avatar."

The prospects for 3D television, however, are another story. I like the concept of another dimension as much as the next guy, but can the big screen 3D theater experience translate into the typical living room setting? In my opinion, not really. At least not yet. From a design standpoint, it's going to take time for consumers to buy into the idea of 3D TV.

While the technology's developers may think they're sitting on a gold mine here, they've unfortunately failed to consider some critical issues that will severely slow its adaption. As a result, here are four reasons why 3D is years away from adoption in the home.

1. Different Context

The assumption that acceptance and desire for a technology in one environment (movie theaters) will translate well to another (home) is a mistake that's easy to make. But, in this case, several differences between the contexts will deter adoption of 3D in the home.

At the theater, it's about a communal experience of many people joining together to be entertained in a way they can't replicate at home. They want to go out for the evening and make an event out of it. But entertainment at home is by its nature a more casual and personal experience that, with the advent of 3D, raises issues such as:

  • Will there be enough 3D glasses for everyone to enjoy the experience? What about guests?
  • The hassle and comfort factor of wearing the hardware at home.
  • The extremely limited availability of desirable content in 3D. And would we really want to watch the local news or "American Idol" in more than two dimensions even if it were possible?
  • It requires a significant investment of money to upgrade for what is (by many accounts at CES) minimal improvement in the viewing experience.

2. High Cost

In these (post?) recessionary times, people view large expenditures differently than they did a few years ago, when every room in the house was seen as a prime spot for a new flat screen. 3D-TV is not the sort of design solution people are willing to spend money on these days. The industry is pushing an expensive novelty that adds little of the kind of meaningful benefit consumers look for in high-end purchases.

3dtv.jpg

The economic downturn has encouraged consumers to re-examine their shopping behavior, and they've become more thoughtful and considerate of their purchases. Buying decisions fueled by novelty or impulse have been replaced by a desire for long-term value from a product, with benefits that consumers readily see as adding to the quality of their lives. Consumers now ask themselves "Will this make my life easier, better, or more fulfilling?" rather than "Oh, look at that shiny new toy, I want one!" -- especially if it's a matter of several hundred or thousand dollars.

3. Poor Timing

People will eventually replace their current flat screens when needed, and may well consider 3D at that time. But 3D will not, on its own, be a compelling reason to buy a new TV for most consumers within the next few years. The flat screens in use now are largely recent purchases, with many years of service life to come. People bought into these TVs too recently to consider an upgrade within the next couple of years.

4. Lack of Universal Standard

The adoption of 3D-TV faces a similar challenge to the acceptance of Blu-ray DVDs, but without the "stick" the DVD market has had -- the threat that standard discs will be discontinued, forcing a (relatively inexpensive) upgrade to a new player. Blu-ray may be the new standard format for DVDs, but 2D-television is not going anywhere for the foreseeable future. And with incompatible 3D technologies competing in the market right now, it's inevitable that consumers will wait on the sidelines until a universal format like Blu-ray becomes the norm.

Missing the Point

So will 3D-TV eventually catch on? Inevitably the tech will improve, enough homes will be at a stage to upgrade to new screens, prices will come down, it may no longer require glasses and so forth. But for the moment, 3D simply doesn't deliver a meaningful experience to consumers on the home front. The value they will place on the technology is not at all commensurate with the hassles and costs of adapting it.

Home entertainment is about spending enjoyable time with family and friends, kicking back and forgetting about the stress of the day. Any new technology aimed at this market has to be responsive to the underlying needs people have for this aspect of their lives. The DVR is a perfect example of truly meaningful design in this arena, and its rapid success was virtually ensured from the day it was introduced. It solved a problem and addressed a compelling desire.

Similarly, instant access to movies and events through direct streaming to your TV has taken this desire for personal control over TV viewing to a new level. That's the kind of innovation people are looking to spend money on right now. Online gaming, direct to TV, seems to be the natural evolution of this trend. Several companies have promised that, as soon as next year, we'll be able to stream the latest games to our TVs without the need for a dedicated console that's obsolete in two years. Play when you like on a subscription basis, no need to invest in games that you may tire of in a few weeks. If it works as promised, I think it's going to be a huge success.

But for now, I think Sony and other manufacturers betting big on 3D TV have missed the point. Design and innovation have to be in sync with consumer needs, even if they lead by a year or two. Pushing 3D TV seems like more of a "we can do it, so let's do it" approach to product development, ignoring the reality that adding simulated depth to the at-home viewing experience is pretty low on most people's priorities right now.

Image of 3D dinosaur by Mark Wallace via Flickr.

Joel Delman is the Los Angeles-based design director of Product Development Technologies. With a background in corporate law and business, and 15 years in product development, Joel understands the business side of creativity and how to strategically guide innovation and design. Prior to joining PDT, Joel spent time as a senior designer for Zenith Electronics, Cousins Design and Henry Dreyfuss Associates (New York). He also practiced corporate law with Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart in Florida. Joel received his Master of Industrial Design from Pratt Institute, his JD (corporate and patent) from Harvard Law School and his Bachelor's in Economics from New York University's Stern School of Business. His personal blog is Product Fetish.

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January 17 2010

20:41

Digitalsmiths Teams with Microsoft, Readies News and Sports Deals

Digital media and metadata company Digitalsmiths paired up with Microsoft to demonstrate a technology partnership between the two companies, Digitalsmiths CEO Ben Weinberger told me at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

At the show, Microsoft demonstrated how Digitalsmiths can help add more interactivity to Silverlight movies so viewers could click on a character, actor or object and link back to more information on places like Bing, Weinberger said. Expect more details on the technology demonstration soon, he added. Digitalsmiths works with television and movie studios to manage the metadata and rights relating to their assets, so they can wring more revenue from their existing and library content. Customers include Warner Bros., TMZ, Paramount and others.

Weinberger also shared some details on where Digitaltsmiths is headed next -- the news and sports business. Digitalsmiths will announce new deals shortly in this area, marking the first time the company will apply its tools to a live viewing environment. "Now it can be applied to things like news and sports that are more temporal. We signed a deal and will announce soon," he told Beet.TV.

The company inked a deal late last year with Paramount to create a clip portal for its licensees to use when they need content from Paramount movies. "The content is then delivered with clip they want, what you want, how you want it delivered," he said. 

Digitalsmiths makes money via a license fee, with its fees increasing as traffic and volume for its customers grow.  

-Daisy Whitney, Senior Producer


January 08 2010

19:41

4 Minute Roundup: 3D TV Hype at CES; Nexus One Phone

Here's the latest 4MR audio report from MediaShift. In this week's edition, I consider the hype around 3D TV at the Consumer Electronics Show. While many companies and even cable channels are announcing 3D TV initiatives, it seems doubtful that huge numbers of people will be drawn to the technology this year. Plus, Google unveiled its Nexus One phone to decent reviews, but it might have trouble with other phone makers who use Android and don't want to compete with Google hardware.

Check it out:

Background music is "What the World Needs" by the The Ukelele Hipster Kings via PodSafe Music Network.

Here are some links to related sites and stories mentioned in the podcast:

3D TV to steal scene at electronics show at Detroit Free Press

RealD signs big names for 3D TV at CNET

Experiencing 3D TV first-hand at Macworld

Let's Get Real - Why The Reporting On 3D TV Is Mostly Hype at PaidContent

Nexus One Review - The Best Android Phone To Date":http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/01/05/nexus-one-google-phone-to_n_390219.html at Huffington Post

Microsoft - Google's Nexus One will hurt Android at Ars Technica

Apple's War With Google Heats Up at Silicon Alley Insider

iSlate, Nexus One Kill Microsoft's 15 Minutes at InformationWeek

3 Reasons The Google Nexus One Won't Live Up To The Hype at ChannelWeb

Financial Times's content revenues set to overtake print ad income at the Guardian

LA Times Laying Off 80; Both The Monday Business Section, Paper Size To Shrink As Well at PaidContent

Tablet Fever - How Apple Could Go Where No Computer Maker Has Gone Before at Xconomy

Here's a graphical view of the most recent MediaShift survey results. The question was: "What's your wish for the new year?"

new year wish grab.jpg

Also, be sure to vote in our poll about your thoughts on 3D TV:


What do you think about 3D TV?(trends)

Mark Glaser is executive editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He also writes the bi-weekly OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. He lives in San Francisco with his son Julian. You can follow him on Twitter @mediatwit.

This is a summary. Visit our site for the full post ».

January 07 2010

18:12

Google's Chrome Has 40 Million Active Users, Glide Annouces Extension at CES

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA--Google's Chrome has reached 40 million active users since the Windows beta release in September 2008.  Beet.TV's Daisy Whitney visited Google headquarters to speak with Google spokesman Eitan Bencuya about developments with the new browser. 

Eitan says Google recently launched beta versions of Chrome for Mac and Linux, which are tailored to the attributes of each platform instead of being merely an adaptation of the Windows version. 

Additionally, Google has just added an extension platform for beta users of Chome on Windows and Linux.  To introduce the 800+ extensions, Google hosted an event that 140 developers attended and spoke at December's Add-On Con.

Today at CES, Glide, a Transmedia company that created a comprehensive Ad-Free cloud computing solution, announces its extension for Chrome that equips Chrome with file synchronization and file format translation features.  It also provides 20GB of free storage without any ads. This will purportedly "one-up" the yet unreleased version of Chrome OS, but TechCrunch.com says it's still fairly clunky.

Allison Salewski, Associate Producer

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