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February 10 2012

03:48

The temporary, pop-up corporation

A stat I heard repeated all over Davos: that the average lifespan of a Fortune 500 company is now 15 years, according to Cisco’s John Chambers. Trying to confirm that figure, I found others saying the number is less than 50.

Whatever. It’s far from forever.

So what if corporations more and more become short-lived enterprises? What would that mean?

Consider that Kodak just announced that 124 years after it started, it will stop making cameras. GM and Chrysler a mess of banks would have died, if they weren’t too big to fail. Borders and and Circuit City and Blockbuster and giant retailers are dead. Whole industries are dying.

Now consider that Kickstarter just passed a key milestone: two projects garnering more than $1 million in … what do we call it? … contributions? purchases? investments? We don’t have the right name yet for orders received before a company starts and a product is made. We don’t have a name for a company founded on its customers’ capital.

I have been arguing that vertical industries will be replaced by horizontal ecosystems made up of three layers: (1) platforms that enable (2) entrepreneurial ventures to be created at low cost and risk and (3) networks (e.g., ad networks) that, when needed, bring these ventures together to reach the critical mass that firms used to provide.

Of course, enterprises today can start with no need to build factories (use someone else’s) or distribution (plenty of that, for now) or technology (use the cloud) or marketing (let your customers do it for you) or design (let your customers help) or retail outlets (they’re dying anyway) or capital (see above). We know that this new architecture of the economy means enterprises can be launched with less investment, risk, and effort.

But consider that it also means that enterprises can disappear without leaving much of a hole. The guy who made the Kickstarter-backed iPod Nano watchband, who raised almost $1 million and guaranteed himself success (so long as he priced the product right), can keep making it until it isn’t hot anymore and then just do something else. No need to worry about long-term return on investment; no need to fret over feeding a factory-full of workers. Bermuda, here he comes.

But that’s not how our economy is built. How often do you hear that the wise person invests for the long term? Well, what’s long-term now? A generation? A decade? A few months?

If this is the case, then the platforms that make this temporary economy possible — Amazon and its web services, eBay and its retail chain, FedEx and its distribution chain, Google and Facebook and their marketing power — will be the best long-term plays. That’s why VCs keep saying they want to invest in platforms. But there’s only so many of those.

Of course, the problem for VCs in the last decade has been that start-ups just don’t need them as much as they used to. That will be ever more the case. Now the rest of us will know how the VCs feel. Where can you put our money if you’re an investment fund or a pension fund or a plain investor? Where will equity grow? Will it? I wish to hell I knew.

I’ve also been arguing lately that technology is leading to efficiency over growth. That, too, means that it will be difficult to find new jobs and equity growth.

Oh, there will be wealth. Witness Facebook’s IPO. But consider that Facebook serves soon a billion people with a staff the size of a metro newspaper company and they will end up with much greater wealth in fewer hands. Technology will not solve the economic imbalance of the 1 percent but make it worse, unless you’re one of those 3,000 employees of the platform or you manage to start a new company — likely a temporary, pop-up company — on top of it.

July 30 2011

19:46

"Facebook for Business" guide launched, while Google+ for business still not in sight

PC Magazine :: Facebook unveiled "Facebook for Business" earlier this week. A five-page guide that the social network created to show companies how they can maximize their social presence on the site. It covers everything from a general overview of the relationship between businesses and Facebook pages to categorical, step-by-step instructions for helping neophyte companies navigate the world of Facebook (and its many features) for the first time.

 

Continue to read David Murphy, www.pcmag.com

May 09 2011

09:59

Playing to the audience

…in which I mangle a metaphor in search of a thought about the relationship between journo and audience.

Time was that when I was asked about the value of social media platforms like twitter for journos, amongst the reasons I would give is the capacity to build audience.

The value of the individual journalist as a brand in a networked world (in contrast to the large media org) is something I repeatedly bang on about. But the truth is that there will always be some intersection between the sole trader and the big media hubs. In fact the prevailing model seems to be that apart from a tight core of full-time staff, most big orgs will have a steady stream of freelancers in their orbit to keep their mass.

In that respect having an audience that already follow ‘brand you’ rather than ‘brand x’ is just as attractive to the big media orgs as it is your own work.

I used to liken this to the idea of being in a band.

Record companies, even venues, wouldn’t look at you without some proof that you had audience. Signing mailing list sheets, following on myspace and now twitter and Facebook are ways that bands tried to do that.

But a chat with my excellent colleagues clarecook and Robert beers and the recent blogging about guardian local got me thinking about the danger of taking that idea too far.

How long would a band have an audience if they didn’t listen to those fans? If they didn’t tell the fans where they were playing next or what they were up to?

Many journos still stick to the idea that communication with an audience should only be one way. Some will tell you it’s because of the problems with managing the flow (busy, busy people journos) whilst others will happily tell you that they have no interest in the dribbling rantings of a few nut jobs ( because anyone who uses the web other than them is a nut job).

Truth is that if the audience isn’t behind you, you have nothing.

You could argue that the best musicians do what they do regardless of what the audience wants. They are artists. I’ve got news for you. When it comes to the web you’re not an artist. You can’t create in a platform or hack away in a garret.

If you don’t nurture and talk to the audience then, in a world of pay-to-play journalism you’ve got nothing.

Increasingly the opportunities are there for those who look out in to the audience rather than those who point their sites in a singular dash for a job with the media mothership. The crowd is not just a means of getting you there. They are the measure of your success and integrity (not just other journos)

It’s a lesson that big media orgs could learn too. Stop thinking like a record company think more like a concert promoter. The days of being the big media ‘stadium acts’ are fast becoming numbered. Maybe there is room for a few headliners at the festival but the vast majority of people are here for the rest of the bill (the long tail!).

So maybe, in future, when I’m asked about the value of social media, I’ll still be talking about the value of audience. But maybe I’ll put the band metaphor to bed. Truth is the dynamics are being rewritten everyday, just like the opportunities, and they are being written on an individual level – no band required.

09:57

Playing to the audience

…in which I mangle a metaphor in search of a thought about the relationship between journo and audience.

Time was that when I was asked about the value of social media platforms like twitter for journos, amongst the reasons I would give is the capacity to build audience.

The value of the individual journalist as a brand in a networked world (in contrast to the large media org) is something I repeatedly bang on about. But the truth is that there will always be some intersection between the sole trader and the big media hubs. In fact the prevailing model seems to be that apart from a tight core of full-time staff, most big orgs will have a steady stream of freelancers in their orbit to keep their mass.

In that respect having an audience that already follow ‘brand you’ rather than ‘brand x’ is just as attractive to the big media orgs as it is your own work.

I used to liken this to the idea of being in a band.

Record companies, even venues, wouldn’t look at you without some proof that you had audience. Signing mailing list sheets, following on myspace and now twitter and Facebook are ways that bands tried to do that.

But a chat with my excellent colleagues clarecook and Robert beers and the recent blogging about guardian local got me thinking about the danger of taking that idea too far.

How long would a band have an audience if they didn’t listen to those fans? If they didn’t tell the fans where they were playing next or what they were up to?

Many journos still stick to the idea that communication with an audience should only be one way. Some will tell you it’s because of the problems with managing the flow (busy, busy people journos) whilst others will happily tell you that they have no interest in the dribbling rantings of a few nut jobs ( because anyone who uses the web other than them is a nut job).

Truth is that if the audience isn’t behind you, you have nothing.

You could argue that the best musicians do what they do regardless of what the audience wants. They are artists. I’ve got news for you. When it comes to the web you’re not an artist. You can’t create in a platform or hack away in a garret.

If you don’t nurture and talk to the audience then, in a world of pay-to-play journalism you’ve got nothing.

Increasingly the opportunities are there for those who look out in to the audience rather than those who point their sites in a singular dash for a job with the media mothership. The crowd is not just a means of getting you there. They are the measure of your success and integrity (not just other journos)

It’s a lesson that big media orgs could learn too. Stop thinking like a record company think more like a concert promoter. The days of being the big media ‘stadium acts’ are fast becoming numbered. Maybe there is room for a few headliners at the festival but the vast majority of people are here for the rest of the bill (the long tail!).

So maybe, in future, when I’m asked about the value of social media, I’ll still be talking about the value of audience. But maybe I’ll put the band metaphor to bed. Truth is the dynamics are being rewritten everyday, just like the opportunities, and they are being written on an individual level – no band required.

March 25 2011

11:25

OpenCorporates partners with ScraperWiki & offers bounties for open data scrapers

This is a guest post by Chris Taggart, co-founder of OpenCorporates

When we started OpenCorporates it was to solve a real need that we and a number of other people in the open data community had: whether it’s Government spending, subsidy info or court cases, we needed a database of corporate entities to match against, and not just for one country either.

But we knew from the first that we didn’t want this to be some heavily funded monolithic project that threw money at the project in order to create a walled garden of new URIs unrelated to existing identifiers. It’s also why we wanted to work with existing projects like OpenKvK, rather than trying to replace them.

So the question was, how do we make this scale, and at the same time do the right thing – that is work with a variety of different people using different solutions and different programming languages. The answer to both, it turns out, was to use open data, and the excellent ScraperWiki.

How does it work? Well, the basics we need in order to create a company record at OpenCorporates is the company number, the jurisdiction and the company’s name. (If there’s a status field — e.g. dissolved/active — company type or url for more data, that’s a bonus). So, all you need to do is write a scraper for a country we haven’t got data for, name the fields in a standard way (CompanyName, CompanyNumber, Status, EntityType, RegistryUrl, if the url of the company page can’t be worked out from the company number), and bingo, we can pull it into OpenCorporates, with just a couple of lines of code.

Let’s have a look at one we did earlier: the Isle of Man (there’s also one for GibraltarIreland, and in the US, the District of Columbia). It’s written in Ruby, because that’s what we at OpenCorporates code in, but ScraperWiki allows you to write scrapers in Python or php too, and the important thing here is the data, not the language used to produce it.

The Isle of Man company registry website is a .Net system which uses all sorts of hidden fields and other nonsense in the forms and navigation. This is a normally bit of a pain, but because you can use the Ruby Mechanize library to submit forms found on the pages (there’s even a tutorial scraper which shows how to do it), it becomes fairly straightforward.

The code itself should be fairly readable to anyone familiar with Ruby or Python, but essentially it tackles the problem by doing multiple searches for companies beginning with two letters, starting with ‘aa’ then ‘ab’ and so on, and for each letter pair iterating through each page of results in turn, which in turn is scraped to extract the data, using the standardised headings to save them in.  That’s it.

In the space of a couple of hours not only have we liberated the data, but both the code and the data are there for anyone else to use too, as well as being imported in OpenCorporates.

However, that’s not all. In order to kickstart the effort OpenCorporates (technically Chrinon Ltd, the micro start-up that’s behind OpenCorporates) is offering a bounty for new jurisdictions opened up.

It’s not huge (we’re a micro-startup remember): £100 for any jurisdiction that hasn’t been done yet, £250 for those territories we want to import sooner rather than later (Australia, France, Spain), and £500 for Delaware (there’s a captcha there, so not sure it’s even possible), and there’s an initial cap of £2500 on the bounty pot (details at the bottom of this post).

However, often the scrapers can be written in a couple of hours, and it’s worth stressing again that neither the code nor the data will belong to OpenCorporates, but to the open data community, and if people build other things on it, so much the better. Of course we think it would make sense for them to use the OpenCorporates URIs to make it easy to exchange data in a consistent and predictable way, but, hey, it’s open data ;-)

Small, simple pieces, loosely connected, to build something rather cool. So now you can do a search for, oh say Barclays, and get this:

The bounty details: how it works

Find a country/company registry that you fancy opening up the data for (here are a couple of lists of registries). Make sure it’s from the official registry, and not a commercial reseller. Check too that no-one has already written one, or is in the middle of writing one, by checking the scrapers tagged with opencorporates (be nice, and respect other people’s attempts, but feel free to start one if it looks as if someone’s given up on a scraper).

All clear? Go ahead and start a new scraper (useful tutorials here). Call it something like trial_fr_company_numbers (until it’s done and been OK’d) and get coding, using the headings detailed above for the CompanyNumber, CompanyName etc. When it’s done, and it’s churning away pulling in data, email us info@opencorporates.com, and assuming it’s OK, we’ll pay you by Paypal, or by bank transfer (you’ll need to give us an invoice in that case). If it’s not we’ll add comments to the scraper. Any questions, email us at info@opencorporates.com, and happy scraping.

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