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April 12 2013

21:54

Editors’ Lab at the NYT

On April 20-21, The New York Times will host an Editors' Lab event, bringing together teams from top media companies for two days of working sessions and talks.
Tags: Conferences

August 02 2012

21:47

Announcing TimesOpen 2012

It's that time of the year again! We've just released our schedule for TimesOpen 2012. As always, we'll have four events leading up to an all-day hack day in December.

April 12 2012

22:24

TechRaking unites journalists, technologists

TechRaking 2012, a summit hosted by the Center for Investigative Reporting and Google, brought together an invite-only group at the search giant's headquarters to examine the future of investigative journalism. Read More »

February 10 2012

18:29

Meet us at the Computer-Assisted Reporting Conference

Our team is heading to St. Louis on Feb. 23 for the annual computer-assisted reporting conference, and we'd love to meet you. Come to our sessions or stop us in the hall to learn how we can help your newsroom and how to get involved. Read More »

January 17 2012

11:31

news:rewired – media in motion is now sold out, here is what delegates can look forward to

Tickets for news:rewired – media in motion have now sold out.

Essential information:

  • Time: 9am for registration, please arrive by 9.30 for the start of the conference. The final session will finish at 5.15pm, followed by networking drinks until 8pm.
  • Venue: MSN HQ, Cardinal Place, 100 Victoria Street, London SW1E 5JL – see a map and a picture of the easy-to-spot building.
  • Nearest tube: Victoria (victoria line, circle line and district line)
  • Hashtag: #newsrw
  • Packing list: Don’t forget to bring laptop and phone chargers

As tickets have now sold out, what treats are in store for delegates attending the digital journalism conference on Friday, 3 February?

The one-day conference on the latest trends in digital journalism will open with a keynote speech from Liz Heron, social media editor at the New York Times, who will give delegates a taster of social media strategy from across the pond, outlining how the title taps into social networks for newsgathering and community engagement.

The remainder of the day will feature a total of six sessions and three workshops for delegates to choose from. See the agenda for full details.

You can attend:

1A: Online video - with: Christian Heilmann, Mozilla Popcorn, @codepo8; Adam Westbrook, multimedia journalist, blogger and lecturer, @AdamWestbrook; Josh de la Mare, editor of video, Financial Times. More speakers to be announced.

or

1B: Paid-for content models – with: François Nel, researcher, academic and consultant on newsroom and digital business innovation, @francoisnel; Tom Standage, digital editor, the Economist, @tomstandage; Chris Newell, founder, ImpulsePay.

2A: Mobile reporting – with: Paul Gallagher, head of online content, the Manchester Evening News, @pdgallagher; Nick Martin, Sky News correspondent, @NickMartinSKY; Ben Fawkes, audio content manager, SoundCloud, @benfawkes; Christian Payne, social technologist, mobile story maker, @Documentally.

or

2B: Social media optimisation – with: Nate Lanxon, editor, Wired.co.uk, @NateLanxon; Chris Hamilton, social media editor, BBC News, @chrishams; Martin Belam, user experience lead, the Guardian, @currybet; Darren Waters, head of devices and social media, MSN UK, @darrenwaters.

Workshop A: Search engine optimisation skills – with: Malcolm Coles, digital production director, nationals, Trinity Mirror, @malcolmcoles.

or

Workshop B: Data journalism tools – with Simon Rogers, editor, Guardian Datablog and Datastore, @smfrogers, and Andy Cotgreave, senior product consultant, Tableau, @acotgreave.

or

Workshop C: Searching social media for news – with Nicola Hughes, Knight-Mozilla Fellow, the Guardian @DataMinerUK.

3A: Gaming mechanics in news – with: Bobby Schweizer, doctoral student at the Georgia Institute of Technology and co-author of Newsgames: Journalism at Play, @NewsgamesGT; Shannon Perkins, editor of interactive technologies, Wired.com; Al Trivino, director of innovation at News International, @alfredotrivino; Alastair Dant, interactive lead at the Guardian, @ajdant.

or

3B: Multiplatform stategy – with: Mike Goldsmith, editor-in-chief of iPad and tablet editions, Future Publishing, @mikegoldsmithDouglas Arellanes, technologist, consultant and the director of clients and services, Sourcefabric, @dougiegyro; the Guardian (speaker tbc). More speakers to be announced.

The final session will bring the whole conference together for a debate on setting social media standards – with: Laura Kuenssberg, business editor, ITV News, @ITVLauraK; Neal Mann, digital news editor, Sky News, @fieldproducer; Katherine Haddon, head of online, English, AFP, @khaddon; Tom McArthur, UK editor, Breakingnews.com, @TomMcArthur.

A drinks reception at the end of the conference will provide a chance to network.

December 01 2011

16:36

Jonah Peretti’s secrets to making content go viral

Few people know as much about making content go viral on the web as Jonah Peretti, Huffington Post cofounder and BuzzFeed founder. He’s turned doing so into a science, and at Business Insider’s Ignition conference this week Peretti shared his best tips and tricks for making content go...


12:30

10 liveblogging ideas (and 30 liveblogging tips)

Liveblogging image by Dustin Diaz on Flickr

Liveblogging image by Dustin Diaz on Flickr

Following my previous post about the rise of liveblogging, I wanted to provide a simple list of ideas for student journalists wanting to get some liveblogging experience. Some people assume that you need to wait for a big news event to start a liveblog, but the format has proved particularly flexible in serving a whole range of editorial demands. Here are just a few:

1. A protest or demonstration

Let’s start with the obvious one. Protests and demonstrations are normally planned and announced in advance, so use a tool like Google Alerts to receive emails when the terms are mentioned, as well as following local campaigning groups and local branches of national campaigns. Issues to consider:

  • There will be conflicting versions of events so seek to verify as much as possible – from both demonstrators and police, and any other parties, such as counter-demonstrations.
  • Know as many key facts ahead of time as possible to be able to contextualise any claims from any side. Have links to hand – Delicious is particularly useful as a way of organising these.
  • Make contacts ahead of the event to find out who will be recording it and how those records will be published (e.g. livestream, YouTube, Flickr, Google Maps etc). Make sure you have mobile phone numbers in your contacts book and are following those people on the relevant social network. Try to anticipate where you will be needed most – where will the gaps in coverage be?
  • Don’t just cover the event on the day – build up to it and plan for the aftermath. Walk round the route to plan for the event – and post a photoblog while you’re at it. Interview key participants for profiles while you make contact. Join online forums and Facebook groups and engage with discussions on key issues.

2. An industry conference

Whether you’re reporting on a particular location or a shared interest there will be industries that play a key role in that. And industries have conferences. Use a quick Google search or some of the specialist events listing and organisation services like Exhibitions.co.uk to find them.

Issues to consider:

  • Industries have jargon. Try to familiarise yourself with that ahead of time (follow the specialist press and key figures on social media) or you’ll mis-hear key words and phrases.
  • There are often different events happening at the same time. Plan your schedule so you know where your priorities are.
  • Don’t follow the crowd. Often you will add more value by missing a session in order to conduct an interview or post some deeper analysis. This will also require preparation: organise to meet key individuals ahead of time; read up on the key issues.
  • As above, you’ll also need to know what’s going to be covered well and who’s going to be publishing online at the event. Build-ups will also be useful.

3. A meeting

Council or board meetings, hearings, committees and other public and semi-public meetings often have significant implications for local communities, sections of society or particular industries. They are also often poorly covered. This provides a real opportunity for enterprising individuals to add value to their readership.

In addition, there are more informal meetings of small groups which you can find on sites such as Upcoming and Eventbrite.

Issues to consider:

  • These meetings can easily pass under the radar so make sure you know when they’re taking place. For council meetings, Openly Local’s listings are particularly useful.
  • Many meetings have to publish their minutes – keep up to date with these (ask for them if you have to – use the Freedom of Information Act if you cannot get them any other way) so you know the background.
  • Know who’s who – and make sure you know which is which. Write down their names and where they’re sitting so you can attribute quotes correctly.
  • Prepare for nothing much to happen, most of the time. Concentration is key: newsworthy nuggets will be hidden in dull proceedings – and they won’t be clearly signposted. One advantage of liveblogging is that others can bring your attention to issues you might miss in the flow of reporting.

4. The build up to an event

Anticipation of an event can be an event in itself. The Birmingham Mail’s Friday afternoon liveblogs previewing the weekend’s football fixture are a particularly successful example of this. Really, this is a live chat, with the liveblog format providing the editorial urgency to give it a news twist.

Issues to consider:

  • Have prompts ready to get things started and inject new momentum when conversation dries up – prepare as you would for an interview, only with 100 possible interviewees.
  • Anticipate the main questions and have key facts and links to hand.
  • Get the tone right: can you have a bit of banter? It might be worth preparing a joke or two, or looking for opportunities to make them.

5. Breaking news

While you cannot plan for the exact timing of breaking news, you can prepare for some news events. At the most basic level, you should know how to quickly launch a liveblog once you know you need to do so. Other issues to consider:

6. Your own journey

You don’t need someone else to organise something for you to start a liveblog: you can do something yourself, and liveblog your progress. Considerations:

  • Ideally it should be something with a beginning, a middle and an end over a limited period of time: running a marathon, for example (if you can hold the mobile phone), or collecting 1,000 signatures for a campaign.
  • It should also involve others: the liveblog format lends itself to outside contributions.
  • You’ll have to work harder to make it interesting, so don’t update unless something has changed, and prepare material so you have interesting things to fill the gaps with.

7. A press conference

A familiar sight on 24 hour news channels, press conferences are an obvious candidate for liveblog treatment. You can also add to this similar political events such as the Budget, debates, or Prime Minister’s Questions. The main consideration is that you will be covering the conference alongside other journalists, so your coverage needs to be distinctive. Here are some things to consider:

  • Controlled as they are, press conferences don’t often generate a constant supply of newsworthy quotes, so when a spokesperson is trotting out platitudes or steering questions back to the particular angle she wants to sell, tell us about other things going on in the room: how is the journalist reacting? What is the PR rep doing?
  • If the situation is likely to be tightly controlled, you have a better chance of predicting what will be said, and to prepare for that. In particular, if a person is going to try to ‘spin’ facts in a particular direction, have the facts and evidence ready to ‘unspin’ them – as always, including links.
  • If you want to use one of your question opportunities to give your audience a voice, do so.
  • Likewise, tap into the wit and intelligence of users to liveblog their reactions outside the room to the questions and answers being exchanged inside.

8. A staged event

A liveblog is an obvious choice for a live event, and there are plenty of sporting and cultural events to cover. The obvious candidates – football matches, popular Olympic events – should be avoided, as existing and live coverage will be more than sufficient, so look to less well-covered sports, concerts, performances, fashion shows, exhibitions and other events. Think about:

  • Be aware of rights deals and other restrictions. Live coverages of certain popular sports, such as Premiership football, may be limited. There may be restrictions on taking photographs of cultural events, or recording audio or video at a music event.
  • As with meetings (above) it’s crucial to know who’s who and have a crib sheet of related facts.
  • Be descriptive and engage the senses. Tell us about the atmosphere, smells, sounds, and other elements that make people feel like they’re there.

9. A launch or opening

Product launches and store opening can be very dull affairs, but occasionally generate significant interest – particularly among technology and fashion fans. The interest doesn’t generally make for a sustained news event, so your liveblog is likely to be use that interest as the basis for some broader editorial angles. The tips on a ‘build up to an event’ above, apply again here, as that is essentially what this is, with the following differences:

  • Launches and openings are social gatherings, so try focusing on the people there: interview them, paint a picture of how diverse or similar they are. Tap into their expertise or enthusiasm; work with them.
  • Think about what people might want to know after the launch/opening: tips and tricks on using new technology? The items that are flying off the shelves? Have experts and inside sources on call.

10. Add your own here

Like blogging generally, liveblogs are just a platform, with the flexibility to adapt to a range of circumstances. If Popjustice can liveblog “Things we can learn from Greg James’ interview with Lady Gaga” then you can liveblog anything. If you’ve used them for a purpose not listed here, please let me know and I’ll add it to the list.

Likewise, if you have any tips to add from your own experiences of covering events, please add them in the comments.

02:53

The Future of Media: Apple TV, Pandora in cars, engaging tablets

What does the future of media hold? A new Apple TV, Pandora streaming in cars, increased reader engagement thanks to tablets, according to the speakers at the first day of Business Insiders’ Ignition: Future of Media conference. Among the most interesting take-aways so far: Apple analyst Gene...

02:46

Pandora coming to your car

Pandora is working with car manufacturers to make Pandora seamlessly integrated into cars, CEO Joe Kennedy said today at Business Insider’s Ignition conference. Here is a view preview of how it is integrated into Chevrolet’s upcoming Mylink system – a new touchscreen, voice...

August 01 2011

19:46

TimesOpen 2011: HTML5 and Beyond

The first event in this year's TimesOpen series, HTML5 and Beyond, is kicking off August 16th!

June 13 2011

14:32

What @MayorEmanuel teaches us about real-time information flow

Information can at times move so quickly these days that it can be almost impossible to control the narrative that it creates — even one of your own creation. Dan Sinker, who created the @MayorEmanuel parody Twitter feed when Rahm Emanuel began running for mayor of Chicago, gave a fascinating look at how information flows across the real-time web at the Personal Democracy Forum, telling the story of how his feed evolved and how impossible it can be to control the narrative. “As our communications grow more and more complex, the speed that they travel and faster and faster, the voices within more volumnous, the implications of the chorus harder and harder to control.”


 

13:25

Applying the Slow Food movement to news

In his recent talk to the Personal Democracy Forum, author Dan Gillmor argues for applying the Slow Food movement to news. By that he means, take a breadth. “The sooner something is on Twitter after a major event, the more skeptical… or at least the more you should reserve judgement about it…. The things that are the most amazing, I put in the category of interesting if true. And that feels right to me.”

January 05 2011

17:33

Are People of Color Missing in New Media? A #MediaDiversity Chat

How many times have you been to a technology or media conference and noticed the dominance of white male speakers at the podium or the room? That's what Arizona State University professor and media veteran Retha Hill saw when she attended the recent NewsFoo conference in Phoenix and the ONA conference in Washington, DC.

She wrote about the diversity problem at new media conferences, as well as some possible solutions, in a post on Idea Lab last week. Quickly, the response on social media and in the comments showed that it was a hot topic, and something that resonated with a lot of people in the industry.

So the next day, I organized a Twitter chat at the #mediadiversity hashtag, and invited Retha Hill, Doug Mitchell of New U (and former NPR), and Rafat Ali (founder of PaidContent) to participate. I threw out some questions and thought it was an excellent chat. Not only did we talk about the problems in the industry, but we talked about solutions and what we could do to make conferences -- and newsrooms -- more diverse.

Below is an edited version of the tweets from that conversation last week on Twitter, as culled via KeepStream. You can see a longer version of the chat here.

Plus, Robert Hernandez had a very personal take on this in OJR, and here's his conclusion:

If we don't invest in recruiting and training members of diverse groups to help us do and advanced journalism ... we are royally screwed.

My New Year's resolution is to harness my access and network to improve diversity across the board for web journalism. But I need your help. I need your ideas.

More importantly, in your newsrooms, your communities (and those you are not a part of) need your help. Reach out, connect, participate, preach and downright fight to ensure your news org's journalism reflects the diverse community it covers. Help it stay relevant.

It's hard to argue with his resolution.

Mark Glaser is executive editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He also writes the bi-weekly OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. He lives in San Francisco with his son Julian. You can follow him on Twitter @mediatwit.

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December 20 2010

15:00

The changing of the gatekeeper: Adapting to the new roles for journalists, sources and information

We’re continuing our recaps of the Secrecy and Journalism in the New Media Age conference that took place at the Nieman Foundation on Thursday with the second panel discussion — entitled “Whither the Gatekeeper? Navigating New Rules and Roles in the Age of Radical Transparency.”

The discussion centered on the issue of how has journalism responded to WikiLeaks and others doing some of the work traditionally done by journalists — namely ferreting out documents and information — and how reporters and editors remain important as the interpreters and analysts of news.

The panel includes Walter Pincus, intelligence and national security reporter for The Washington Post, Danielle Brian, executive director of the Project on Government Oversight, Clint Hendler, staff writer for the Columbia Journalism Review, and Maggie Mulvihill, senior investigative producer for the New England Center for Investigative Reporting. Below you’ll also find the archived liveblog and online discussion from the session.

December 17 2010

19:00

Bill Keller on how WikiLeaks has evolved, the NYT reporting process, and threats to national security

Bill Keller’s keynote speech at the Secrecy and Journalism in the New Media Age conference garnered a lot of attention Thursday after the New York Times executive editor made a notable distinction between himself and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange: I don’t regard Julian Assange as a kindred spirit. If he’s a journalist, he’s not the kind of journalist that I am.

Keller’s talk was a broad discussion of the Times’ handling of WikiLeaks documents, from parsing files in the computer-assisted reporting unit to conversations with lawyers and officials in the U.S. government. But Keller also took time to address some of the criticisms of the Times’ working with WikiLeaks. On Thursday, our Michael Morisy summarized Keller’s speech for the Lab, and here is the full video which includes the Q&A. We’ve also included the archived liveblog of the talk with commentary from Twitter.

18:30

Accountability journalism and the law: An international perspective on prosecuting the whistleblowers

If you weren’t able to attend the secrecy and journalism conference here at the Nieman Foundation on Thursday we’ve got good news: You can see it all in video recaps of the day. We’ve already posted the morning keynote from the AP’s Kathleen Carroll, and here’s the first panel discussion: “Prosecuted, Banned, Blamed: Reporters Push Boundaries as a Voice of Public Accountability.”

In light of the news that U.S. authorities are contemplating whether criminal charges can be brought against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, the assembled panel of current and former Nieman Fellows talk about the real threat of prosecution that journalists often face abroad. The panel features Stefan Candea, Rob Rose, Alejandra Matus, and Kevin Doyle offering perspectives on the situation for journalists in Romania, South Africa, Chile and Cambodia. We’ve also included the archived liveblog of the discussion from inside the room and online.

November 22 2010

17:20

Announcing the TimesOpen Hack Day

The first-ever TimesOpen Hack Day is less than two weeks away. Register now!

August 27 2010

19:07

TimesOpen Mobile/Geolocation: Speaker Lineup

Next Thursday, Sept. 2, we're hosting our first in a series of TimesOpen events: TO2.0: Mobile/Geolocation. We have a stellar group of speakers lined up to talk about all things mobile/geo.

August 19 2010

22:17

Announcing the TimesOpen 2.0 Events

Last year, we hosted our first TimesOpen event - a one-day conference where we introduced our APIs to the world.  This year, we want to cover a wider variety of topics, bring in more speakers, get more developers involved, and have more fun (including beer, of course).

August 02 2010

09:22

Interview: Melissa Nelson, Blackbaud TV

Blackbaud TVI recently had the opportunity to connect with Melissa Nelson, Blackbaud's Media Production and Outreach Manager, to learn more about their new initiative, Blackbaud TV. Blackbaud provides software and services to nonprofits to enable them to improve operational efficiency, build relationships, and raise funds. Blackbaud TV is the newest tool they’ve created in an effort to support Nonprofits through informational resources, and I hope this interview serves as a good introduction to the service.

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