Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

June 30 2011

19:38

For 3rd generation of tablet owners content sharing and cloud services will be critical

Forrester :: To which extend will tablets cannibalize products like newspapers, magazines, laptops, netbooks, and TVs? - Forrester's data reveals that cannibalization will unfold in different phases. 1st generation of tablet owners is making tradeoffs with their time. 2nd is enthusiastic about all kinds of gadgets, but faces constraints by lower incomes and stricter budgets. Where are the prospects? -  3rd generation: Tablet buyers show increased demand for home networking and cloud services, e-printing, and DLNA-supported devices that enable content sharing within the home.

Continue to read Sarah Rotman Epps, www.forrester.com

August 09 2010

14:30

GameChanger sees a business model in baseball scores

One of the truisms of the paid-content conversation is that sports information — game scores, analysis, team-specific details — is one of the few types of content that, online as everywhere else, people will happily pay for. And sports sites (ESPN, Scout, Rivals) are putting that truism to work. Which is to say, financial gain.

There’s another platform that wants to be part of that league. GameChanger is trying to monetize not just sports-related content, but sports scoring in general. Via, in particular, a mobile app that coaches and other scorekeepers can use to tabulate the scores of their games. And which they can also use — here’s where we get interested — to automatically distribute those scores to local media.

If you’ve been waiting for the day that the Nieman Journalism Lab discusses the future of news as it relates to Little League…here it is.

GameChanger was designed to solve two problems, the company’s CEO, Ted Sullivan, told me: first, the “archaic” nature of baseball and softball scorekeeping; and second, the challenge fans face in following games remotely, in real time. (Sullivan played baseball in college, and went on to play in the minor leagues — before changing course and getting a degree from the Harvard Business School.) The first problem is an old one, and other apps are attacking it too. To solve the second problem, the platform facilitates targeted — highly targeted — crowdsourcing: via the GameChanger app, baseball and softball scorekeepers use their iPhones or iPads to file the detailed scores of their games, in real time. Those data then get beamed to GameChanger’s central servers, which tally up box scores.

While that means that parents and other interested parties will be able to follow games in real time, online and via text updates, it also means that local news sites have an easy, real-time-accurate piece of sports content that they can embed, via GameChanger’s widget, on their sites. (It works similarly to the Outside.in model of hyperlocal content-sharing.) GameChanger makes money — or, hopes to — though revenue-sharing arrangements with its media partners.

The idea, Sullivan told me, is “to monetize the output side, not the input side.”

GameChanger also markets itself to individuals using a classic freemium model: for free, a fan or follower of a particular team can set up an email alert containing simply the score of the game. If they want SMS updates, though — or updates (hello, parents) having to do with a particular player — they have to pay. The model leverages the classic benefits of sports content: Little League scores, being hyperlocal, are exclusive; they’re also time-sensitive. And there’s also the ostensibly large and committed consumer base: the millions of kids who play Little League every year, their friends, and, of course, their parents. It’s a bit of the old sell-the-Thin-Mints-to-Mom strategy, applied to niche news content.

Sullivan is all too aware of the myriad challenges that come with monetizing information — even, yes, niche information — online. But “we know people will pay for this content,” he says. “I think it’s a rare type of news content that people will pay for.”

Image by Ed Yourdon used under a Creative Commons license.

August 03 2010

17:30

Demotix to distribute photos via Publish2’s news wire

Summer’s brought a growth spurt for Publish 2’s News Exchange. Last week, the cooperative distribution platform announced some big-gun content partners: ProPublica, GlobalPost, Texas Tribune, and Texas Watchdog. And today, it announced another content partner: Demotix, the citizen-and-freelance-journalism driven photography site.

We’re excited to announce that Demotix, the award-winning open photo agency for independent journalists, will begin offering content via Publish2 News Exchange when we launch photo support later this summer. Newspapers and other news organizations will not only benefit from the huge efficiency of sharing photos directly through Publish2 News Exchange, but they will now also benefit from the efficiency of Demotix’s open photo sourcing platform and their presence in the U.S. news market.

The upshot: “With the addition of Demotix to News Exchange, newspapers will also be able to buy photos a la carte for coverage of major news events around the U.S. and around the world.” And “for us at Demotix, CEO Turi Munthe put it, “this opens a potentially very large segment of the US local market, and the thrill of partnering with a new news organisation that truly shares our beliefs and vision of the future.”

It’s a telling collaboration. Demotix (tagline: “The Street Wire”) lives at the intersection of professional and citizen journalism, offering a wire of user-generated images to mainstream outlets. Revenues are split by Demotix and its journalists: every time an image gets picked up from the Demotix wire, its creator gets a 50-percent share of the revenue. (Hence, another tagline: “News by You.”) And, so far, images captured by the community’s 3,200-plus active reporters (hailing from 190 countries) have appeared on some big-time front pages — The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, and Time magazine among them.

(For more background on Demotix, by the way, check out this fantastic overview of the platform and its impact on the freelance image marketplace from the spring issue of our sister publication, Nieman Reports.)

The team-up has been in the works for several months, Publish2’s director of news innovation, Ryan Sholin, told me. It’s not only that “we’re totally open to and interested in partnering with anybody and everybody who wants to distribute content across our pipes”; it’s also that Demotix, with its freelanced-content-distribution approach, makes particular sense as a P2 partner. (That’s one reason why, as Sholin pointed out, the Demotix logo was featured on a slide at the News Exchange’s beta launch at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference back in May.)

“I personally think it’s really cool because they focus so heavily on freelancers and almost, really, citizen journalists,” Sholin says of Demotix. “The premise is: ‘You are an independent journalist walking around town, and you see something cool, and take a picture of it — and we will help you sell it to news organizations.’ That flows so cleanly into the vision of what News Exchange can be for freelancers and independent journalists that it was a very natural fit.”

And what Demotix gets from the deal is essentially amplification of its current distribution mechanism: “the opportunity,” Sholin says, “to take the work that’s running through their system and have a much better distribution channel — to go straight into newspapers’ print publishing systems, straight into their FTP folders — without having to do a whole browse-and-download sort of interface.”

The partnership will roll out later this summer, as part of Publish2’s broader expansion into image distribution. The upcoming photo-support platform will make it easier, Sholin says, “for anybody to share photos — for newspapers to share photos, for other content providers to sell photos in the system.” And “Demotix will be one of the content providers in the system at launch.”

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl