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June 19 2013

15:01

May 30 2013

13:49

May 22 2013

15:40

April 09 2013

11:32

April 08 2013

16:00

#newsrw final session to discuss digital journalism ethics and standards

Journalism.co.uk’s one-day digital journalism conference news:rewired, which takes place later this month on Friday 19 April, will close with a joint discussion session looking at ethics and standards in online journalism, from social media etiquette to linking policies and online corrections.

The session will feature a panel of digital journalists who will share their advice and tips on best practice online:

  • Tom Standage, digital editor, the Economist
  • Jenny Rigby, social media and special projects producer, Channel 4 News
  • Sean Ingle, sports editor, Guardian.co.uk
  • Martin Bryant, managing editor, The Next Web

The session will be driven by discussion between the panel members and the audience.

The full agenda for the conference, which is being held at MSN UK’s offices in Victoria, London, is available online, and there are still tickets left for those who would like to attend on the day.

Tickets cost just £130+VAT and include lunch and refreshments during the day and networking drinks after the event. The conference usually sells out, so buy tickets now to avoid disappointment.

For those interested in an additional day, we also offer ‘news:rewired plus’ tickets for just £310, which include both a ticket to the news:rewired conference on Friday 19 April and a day of intensive training in either advanced online research or data visualisation the day before, Thursday 18 April. Space on these training courses is limited, so book now to secure a place.

April 04 2013

15:23

Announcing Scoopshot as latest sponsor of news:rewired

Scoopshot

We’re pleased to announce Scoopshot as the latest sponsor of news:rewired, which takes place on Friday 19 April.

The one-day digital journalism conference will be held at MSN UK’s offices in Victoria, London.

Scoopshot helps news outlets gather images and video from users who can submit content and state the cost to use it. Media companies can also set “tasks” to request specific content via its mobile app.

Chief executive of Scoopshot Niko Ruokosuo will join the participatory communities session panel at news:rewired. The session will look at engagement with news communities and developing contributory networks.

“Scoopshot looks forward to sharing with the news:rewired audience how a community of a quarter of a million mobile contributors can be used to get instant, unique and authentic image content about anything from anywhere in the world,” the company said.

The rest of the panel includes Blair Hickman, social media producer at ProPublica, Jo Kelly, communities editor for Trinity Mirror regionals and Sarah Brown, a producer at CNN iReport.

The full agenda can be found online, and there is still time to join us on the day. The remaining tickets can be bought at this link for just £130 +VAT each.

April 02 2013

14:14

A closer look at who is coming to news:rewired on Friday 19 April

With most of the tickets for digital journalism conference news:rewired now sold, we’ve taken a look at which organisations delegates are coming from. The list includes local, national and international news outlets, universities, PR agencies and technology firms, as well as a number of freelance journalists. See the Wordle below for a visualisation of the delegate list by company or organisation:

Delegate company wordle April 2013

A list of most of the delegates who will be attending on the day can be found here. There are still some tickets available for just £130 +VAT, which can be purchased at this link.

The agenda and speakers list can also be found on the event website. The speakers list includes digital journalism experts from outlets including Facebook, Google, the Washington Post, the Guardian, Channel 4 News, Huffington Post UK, CNN iReport, ProPublica and many more.

August 15 2012

11:12

News sites should be Islands in the stream

Islands in the stream
That is what we are
No one in-between
How can we be wrong

Dolly Parton! Well, actually the BeeGees (well if we are being really pedantic Hemingway). What the hell is that about Andy!

Well, Mary Hammilton (a must follow @newsmary on twitter) highlighted a post by entrepreneur, writer and geek living imploring us to stop publishing webpages and start publishing streams:

Start moving your content management system towards a future where it outputs content to simple APIs, which are consumed by stream-based apps that are either HTML5 in the browser and/or native clients on mobile devices. Insert your advertising into those streams using the same formats and considerations that you use for your own content. Trust your readers to know how to scroll down and skim across a simple stream, since that’s what they’re already doing all day on the web. Give them the chance to customize those streams to include (or exclude!) just the content they want.

I found it a little bit of a mish-mash really. In principle, lots to agree with but the practice was less clear. It makes sense if you’re in to developing the ‘native clients’ but harder to quantify if your’e a content creator.

More interesting was the twitter discussion it generated between Mary and her Guardian colleague Jonathan Haynes (the equally essential @jonathanhaynes) which I hitched my wagon to.  Haynes didn’t agree with the premise of the post and that generated an intersting discussion.

I’ve created a storyfy below but it got me thinking about some general points which are a little ‘devils advocate’:

  • What is this stream anyway – is it the capacity to filter  or is the depth and breadth of content you have to filter. I would say it’s the latter. Facebook and Twitter are streams because of the sheer weight of numbers and diversity of users.
  • Why be the stream when you can be part of it – Part of what Anil posted about was making stuff available to use in streams. I can’t disagree with that but it strays in to the idea of feeding the content ecosystem that, in blunt terms, is often played as parasitic. For all the advocacy of allowing user control, the one thing news orgs are still loathed to do is move people outside the site. Is looking at new ways to recreate the stream experience within a site simply a way of admitting that you aren’t really part of the stream?
  • Are you confusing your consumption habits with your users – whilst the stream might be useful for information pros like journos is it really what consumers want for their news. The stream suits the rolling nature of journalism. Not in the broadcast sense, just in the sense of ‘whats new’. Do your audience consume like you do?
  • Are you removing the value proposition of a journalist? – by putting the control of the stream in the hands of the user are you doing yourself out of a job. I know what the reply to that will be: “No, because the content of the stream will be done by us and  we will curate the stream”. Well in that sense it’s not a stream is it. It’s a list of what you already do. Where’s that serendipity or the compulsion to give people what they need (to live,thrive and survive) rather than what they want?
  • Confusing presentation with creation - That last point suggests a broader one. You can’t simply repackage content to simply ride the wave when your core business different. It’s like calling a column a blog – we hate that don’t we. So why call a slightly different way of presenting the chronology of content a stream?

That’s before we have even got to the resource issue. News orgs can’t handle the social media flow as it is.

So, Islands in the stream?  Well, thinking about the points above, especially the first one, what’s wrong with being something different. What’s wrong with being a page is world of updates.  What’s wrong with being a place where people can step out of the stream and stay a while to dry off and get a bit of orientation.

[View the story "What should news sites be - pages or streams" on Storify]

What should news sites be – pages or streams

Entrepreneur, writer and geek Anil Dash has posted a request that people stop publishing pages and start creating streams.

Storified by Andy Dickinson · Wed, Aug 15 2012 04:17:12

Stop Publishing Web PagesMost users on the web spend most of their time in apps. The most popular of those apps, like Facebook, Twitter, Gmail, Tumblr and others,…
Start moving your content management system towards a future where it outputs content to simple APIs, which are consumed by stream-based apps that are either HTML5 in the browser and/or native clients on mobile devices. Insert your advertising into those streams using the same formats and considerations that you use for your own content. Trust your readers to know how to scroll down and skim across a simple stream, since that’s what they’re already doing all day on the web. Give them the chance to customize those streams to include (or exclude!) just the content they want.
An interesting post which generated some interesting discussion when Guardian Journo Mary Hamilton posted it to twitter. 
@newsmary I *hate* that piece. Am I the only person left who likes the web, and webpages, and tolerates apps whilst sincerely hating them?Greg Callus
@Greg_Callus No, I don’t think you are. But I do think there’s room for other presentations as well as single static URL.Mary Hamilton
@newsmary There is, I just hate the Appify movement & ‘streams’. And there’s a reason Guardian Network Front isn’t RSS feed of our content.Greg Callus
@newsmary Where’s the evidence readers ‘like’ streams & apps? Rather than utility sacrificed for convenience b/c that’s what mobile could doGreg Callus
@Greg_Callus Where’s the evidence they don’t? Don’t think people are using Facebook/Tumblr etc while disliking the approach that much.Mary Hamilton
@newsmary Drop/plateau in Facebook numbers since move from Profile to Timeline? Not universal but thnk his claim they ‘like streams’ not metGreg Callus
@Greg_Callus But significant rise since the introduction of the news feed, which is a stream.Mary Hamilton
@newsmary Touche! Thing is I love Twitter as a stream. Where chronological key, it works (like comments). Where content needs hierarchy, notGreg Callus
@Greg_Callus Yeah, there are def some big issues with streams wrt hierarchy – but also with pages too. It’s not a solved problem.Mary Hamilton
It wasn’t the only chat. Mary’s tweet had already attracted the attention of her Guardian colleague Jonathan Haynes who took issue with the basic premise.
@newsmary no! Much more important is: Stop thinking you’re the medium when you’re the content provider!Jonathan Haynes
@JonathanHaynes Different issues, surely? You can be a content provider with a stream.Mary Hamilton
@newsmary what’s a stream Mary, what’s a stream? it’s a load of contentJonathan Haynes
@JonathanHaynes Compared to a flat page, it’s a different way of organising that content. That’s not a difficult distinction…Mary Hamilton
@newsmary it’s the same content! *head desk*Jonathan Haynes
@JonathanHaynes And the point of the piece I linked is that news orgs should present it differently. Struggling to see your point.Mary Hamilton
@JonathanHaynes Compared to a flat page, it’s a different way of organising that content. That’s not a difficult distinction…Mary Hamilton
@newsmary present it how? it’s presented in every way alreadyJonathan Haynes
@alexhern @newsmary *head desk*Jonathan Haynes
I wondered whether, given the content hungry nature of the stream if media orgs had the resource or know-how to take Dash’s advice.
@newsmary @jonathanhaynes also the issue here that stream implies a constant flow. A mechanism of displaying constantly changing content.Andy Dickinson
@newsmary @jonathanhaynes not sure that most orgs can promise that without USB and sm. something most have no talent or resource for.Andy Dickinson
@digidickinson @newsmary indeedJonathan Haynes
Mary didn’t think that was the issue. It was more about what you did with what you had and how people used it.
@digidickinson @JonathanHaynes Not certain that’s true – using a single blog as the example. More talking about customisation & user flow?Mary Hamilton
@newsmary @digidickinson how does a blog show importance? it’s just a stream.Jonathan Haynes
@JonathanHaynes Sticky posts, design highlights. Not a new problem.Mary Hamilton
But that still didn’t answer the core question for me – where does the content needed to create a stream come from?
@JonathanHaynes @newsmary that’s about relevance- is timeliness relevance or curation. Can see a case for chronology but still needs ‘stuff’Andy Dickinson
@JonathanHaynes @newsmary stuff that is new to appear ‘chronologically’Andy Dickinson
Jonathan was still struggling with the idea of the stream
@newsmary @digidickinson then how is that a stream?Jonathan Haynes
@JonathanHaynes @digidickinson How is a blog a stream if it has sticky posts? *headdesk*Mary Hamilton
I could kind of see Jonathan’s point.
@newsmary @jonathanhaynes slightly different issue there. One to watch as you are talking about subverting (damming it with sticky posts)Andy Dickinson
@newsmary @jonathanhaynes that changes the consistency of presentation for publishers sake, without the users permission. Breaks the premiseAndy Dickinson
@newsmary @jonathanhaynes like twitter being able to keep one tweet at top of your feed when it suitedAndy Dickinson
But Dan Bentley pointed out that there are a number of sites that seem to do ‘the stream’ well. 
@digidickinson @newsmary @jonathanhaynes you can stream content and still tell people what’s important http://itv.co/NDpTxdDaniel Bentley
Latest News – ITV NewsTia accused faces Old Bailey No application for Hazell bail by Jon Clements – Crime Correspondent Lord Carlile QC (representing Stuart Ha…
@DJBentley @digidickinson @JonathanHaynes Good example, that. Cheers.Mary Hamilton
But sites like ITV rely heavily on UGC and that’s a big issue. It still comes down to where you get the content from and if the org is resourced to do that.
@DJBentley @newsmary @jonathanhaynes true but the itv example better illustrates the point I made about where the content comes fromAndy Dickinson
@DJBentley @newsmary @jonathanhaynes it’s curating content but it’s still content and it has to come from somewhere at regular intervals.Andy Dickinson
@DJBentley @newsmary @jonathanhaynes that’s not an impossibility but it is a core challenge for orgs – always has been online esp. with smAndy Dickinson
@JonathanHaynes @djbentley @newsmary think that highlights core issue here-presentation separate to mechanism to create content to presentAndy Dickinson
Another example 
@DJBentley @digidickinson @newsmary @jonathanhaynes Breaking News does similar with their verticals (sorry to butt in) http://breakingnews.com/TomMcArthur
Breaking news, latest news, and current events – breakingnews.comThe latest breaking news around the world from hundreds of sources, all in one place.
@TomMcArthur I like @breakingnews style for streams a lot – suits it perfectly.Mary Hamilton
But Jonathan is not a fan of the ITV approach.
@digidickinson @DJBentley @newsmary ITV site is a car crash though. and how a minority want news presented isn’t necessarily representativeJonathan Haynes
And has an example of his own to highlight that the page is not quite dead…
@digidickinson @TomMcArthur @newsmary @DJBentley most successful UK newspaper website is Mail Online. sticks rigidly to articles.Jonathan Haynes
Home | Mail OnlineMailOnline – all the latest news, sport, showbiz, science and health stories from around the world from the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday…
@JonathanHaynes @digidickinson @TomMcArthur @newsmary is the Mail Online a good news source?Daniel Bentley
Another example pops up later on as an aside to the conversations
The Reddit Editundefined
@newsmary @TomMcArthur The news site of the future looks a lot more like that or http://bit.ly/NDsuHw than 240 hyperlinks and 60 picturesDaniel Bentley
@DJBentley @TomMcArthur Yes, I agree.Mary Hamilton
and Mary takes the chance to voice her view of the term newspaper site.
@JonathanHaynes @digidickinson @DJBentley “Newspaper website” is an oxymoron that cannot die quickly enough for my liking.Mary Hamilton
@newsmary @jonathanhaynes @djbentley agree with sentiment but sadly it is still a very apt description of the general process and mentalityAndy Dickinson
@newsmary @digidickinson @DJBentley touché. sorry, news site.Jonathan Haynes
In the continuing conversations Jonathan is concerned that this might be a bit of the thrill of the new…
@DJBentley @digidickinson @TomMcArthur @newsmary consumption and creation are different. and early adopters are not the norm.Jonathan Haynes
@JonathanHaynes @DJBentley @digidickinson Thing is, stream consumption isn’t a minority or early adopter thing any more.Mary Hamilton
@newsmary @jonathanhaynes @djbentley true but danger is going for mode of presentation without considering the mechanics.Andy Dickinson
@newsmary @jonathanhaynes @djbentley number of individuals needed to make a stream vs number needed to present it.Andy Dickinson
So Jonathan asks about a concrete example.
@newsmary @digidickinson @DJBentley so how would that look for "the Guardian" streams works as multiple source and crows editingJonathan Haynes
@newsmary @digidickinson @DJBentley crowd, not crows. what I get from Twitter I want, but I also want websites to show me hierarchy.Jonathan Haynes
@newsmary @digidickinson @DJBentley and content is discrete elements. should be available in all forms but need to be ‘page’ to do soJonathan Haynes
@JonathanHaynes @digidickinson @DJBentley Let me subscribe to tags; filter my stream on my own interest & curated importance?Mary Hamilton
@newsmary @DJBentley @digidickinson you want to subscribe to tags?! might as well have an RSS feed! ;)Jonathan Haynes
Dan highlighted a problem which, I guess, he would see the stream as helping to solve.
@JonathanHaynes @newsmary @digidickinson I don’t feel current news site frontpages do a particularly good job at hierarchy. Too much stuff.Daniel Bentley
@JonathanHaynes @newsmary @digidickinson Google News or the new digg http://bit.ly/NDuNuc do a better job and that’s mostly algorithm.Daniel Bentley
Google News- As the courtroom emptied after Barry Bonds’ obstruction-of-justice conviction Wednesday afternoon, the slugger stood off to one side, h…
DiggThe best news, videos and pictures on the web as voted on by the Digg community. Breaking news on Technology, Politics, Entertainment, an…
@DJBentley @newsmary @digidickinson too much stuff? and yet you want an endless stream??Jonathan Haynes
But for Dan the stream has a purpose 
@JonathanHaynes @newsmary @digidickinson the stream tells me what’s new, the traditional frontpage doesn’t know what it’s doing.Daniel Bentley
@JonathanHaynes @newsmary @digidickinson Am I what’s new? Am I what’s important? Am I everything that has been written in the last 24hrs?Daniel Bentley
@DJBentley @newsmary @digidickinson no, you’re the carefully edited combination of all of the below!Jonathan Haynes
@JonathanHaynes @newsmary @digidickinson carefully edited? How is 240 links on Guardian and 797 (!) on Mail Online carefully edited?Daniel Bentley
@DJBentley @newsmary @digidickinson *sigh*Jonathan Haynes
Frustrating as it may be it’s a real problem and which Mary sums up with
@DJBentley @JonathanHaynes @digidickinson Part of problem with hierarchy on fronts is trying to be all things to all visitors.Mary Hamilton
But, to be honest, I can’t see how the stream would be any better other than to put the responsibility back on to the user. But I’ve more to add in a blog post….
News sites should be Islands in the stream | andydickinson.netIslands in the stream That is what we are No one in-between How can we be wrong Dolly Parton! Well, actually the BeeGees (well if we are …

 

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August 07 2012

13:34

First speaker and session details for news:rewired, Thursday 6 December

We’re pleased to announce the first speaker and session details for the next news:rewired, taking place on Thursday 6 December.

news:rewired will bring together key digital journalism experts and innovators for a day of sessions, workshops, debates and discussion, geared towards equipping you with knowledge of the latest techniques and tools for producing top-notch digital journalism, as well as offering insight into some of the innovative projects evolving within today’s newsrooms – and outside of them.

Here are just some of the session and workshop topics that will be covered at the one-day conference:

  • a look at the key digital lessons learned by news outlets in 2012
  • the opportunities for long-form, in-depth journalism on digital platforms
  • collecting social conversations on networked platforms
  • ideas on how to measure success and make money in the coming year
  • tips for effective audio storytelling
  • reporting in real-time and best practice in liveblogging
  • top tips for Twitter reporting strategy

Sessions will range from panels offering presentations and discussion around certain topics, and more workshop-style sessions, offering demonstrations and practical guides to digital tools.

Speakers already confirmed include:

  • Bobbie Johnson, co-founder of Matter and European editor of GigaOm
  • Alex Miller, executive editor of VICE UK
  • Nate Lanxon, editor of Wired.co.uk
  • Google+ (speaker to be confirmed)

We will be announcing more session and speaker details very soon; keep an eye on www.newsrewired.com for regular updates.

At December’s event we want to make sure delegates get to hear about as many of the tools and platforms which have launched in the past year as possible, and offer the chance to meet those behind the technology.

So this time we’re also looking to include a ‘lightning round‘ of 90-second thought provokers. Let us know if you’d like to suggest anyone to take part in this (feel free to nominate yourself) and we will select around six projects to hear about on the day. We are particularly keen to make sure this gives young innovators in the journalism industry a chance to showcase their work.

When…

  • Thursday 6 December at MSN UK, Cardinal Place, Victoria, London.

There are two ticketing options for news:rewired this time round.

news:rewired: Delegates can purchase a ticket for the one-day conference at the earlybird discount rate of £95 (+VAT) for a limited time. Lunch and refreshments will also be provided at the day-long event, as well as networking drinks afterwards.

news:rewired PLUS: With this new option delegates can instead purchase one of our news:rewired PLUS tickets, which includes both a day’s intensive training on the Wednesday (5 December) and the day-long conference on the Thursday (6 December).

With the news:rewired PLUS ticket delegates can choose one of the three options below for the day of intensive training (the links below give an idea of the content of each course – the dates mentioned on the pages linked to are not part of news:rewired PLUS, this is only available on Wednesday 5 December):

- Introduction to data journalism, run by Paul Bradshaw

- Online media law, run by David Banks

- Advanced online research skills, run by Colin Meek

news:rewired PLUS tickets are also available at an earlybird discount rate of £280 (+VAT).

There will only be 50 tickets (including news:rewired and news:rewired PLUS tickets) available at the discounted rate.

We’ve already sold a third of these and the discount will only apply until 31 August. After this date or once all the tickets have been sold, whichever comes first, the news:rewired ticket price will rise to £130 (+VAT) and the news:rewired PLUS ticket price will rise to £310 (+VAT).

You can buy either of these tickets at this link. If you select a news:rewired PLUS ticket we will contact you to confirm which training course you would like to attend on the Wednesday and provide further details. Space on these training courses will be limited and running of them will be subject to demand.

If you have already booked a ticket for news:rewired and would like to upgrade to a news:rewired PLUS ticket contact Journalism.co.uk editor Rachel McAthy via email.

July 25 2012

13:29

Presentation: Tools for visual storytelling workshop by @Coneee

During news:rewired – full stream ahead on Friday (13 July), Conrad Quilty-Harper, interactive news editor at the Telegraph, ran a workshop on tools for visual storytelling.

Here is a copy of his presentation:

April 25 2012

12:58

Latest on news:rewired – full stream ahead: First speakers announced

Speakers on the final panel at our last event, news:rewired – media in motion

We’re pleased to announce more details about our next digital journalism conference, news:rewired – full stream ahead.

The one-day event will bring together key digital journalism experts for a day of sessions and workshops, focused on the latest tools, techniques and tips on how to produce the best journalism online and make it earn its keep, with innovative case studies from the industry.

Today we’re announcing some of the speakers who will be taking part on the day (Friday 13 July).

Jo Geary, digital development editor, the Guardian

Mark Johnson, community editor, the Economist

Craig Silverman, founder, Regret the Error (now published on Poynter)

Conrad Quilty-Harper, interactive news editor, the Telegraph

Jason Mills, editor of web development, ITV News

Luke Lewis, editor, NME.com

Paul Bradshaw, visiting professor in online journalism at City University London and Course Leader of the MA in Online Journalism at Birmingham City University. Paul is also publisher of the Online Journalism Blog and founder of Help Me Investigate.

Sessions at the one-day conference will cover:

  • how to work with and maximise engaged communities across platforms
  • the latest developments in mobile news publishing and how best to exploit portable platforms
  • the array of social media platforms at a journalist’s disposal, beyond (and including) Twitter and Facebook
  • advice on handling rumour online and the recommended verification and correction processes
  • money matters – the latest approaches to making money from news online and what users are prepared to offer in exchange for content
  • how the ‘live stream’ approach to digital news reporting and live social feeds are being built into traditional news output

You can book tickets here for just £95 (+VAT) but be quick, 70 per cent of the early-bird tickets have already gone.

There are just 50 early-bird tickets available in total, which we will sell until Monday 14 May at a discounted rate of £95 (+VAT). After this date, or once all 50 tickets have been bought (whichever comes first), ticket prices will rise to £130 (+VAT).Tickets can be purchased at this link and will include lunch, refreshments and after event drinks on the day.

For more information about tickets and availability email ed[at]journalism.co.uk.

For sponsorship/advertising queries contact stefanie[at]journalism.co.uk or james[at]journalism.co.uk.

January 19 2012

10:51

A Wordle to show who is coming to news:rewired – media in motion

With tickets now sold out for news:rewired – media in motion, who will be there on the day?

A list of delegates is available here, but we have also created the Wordle below to illustrate the representation of companies at the digital journalism conference on 3 February, based on the delegates attending:

January 17 2012

11:31

news:rewired – media in motion is now sold out, here is what delegates can look forward to

Tickets for news:rewired – media in motion have now sold out.

Essential information:

  • Time: 9am for registration, please arrive by 9.30 for the start of the conference. The final session will finish at 5.15pm, followed by networking drinks until 8pm.
  • Venue: MSN HQ, Cardinal Place, 100 Victoria Street, London SW1E 5JL – see a map and a picture of the easy-to-spot building.
  • Nearest tube: Victoria (victoria line, circle line and district line)
  • Hashtag: #newsrw
  • Packing list: Don’t forget to bring laptop and phone chargers

As tickets have now sold out, what treats are in store for delegates attending the digital journalism conference on Friday, 3 February?

The one-day conference on the latest trends in digital journalism will open with a keynote speech from Liz Heron, social media editor at the New York Times, who will give delegates a taster of social media strategy from across the pond, outlining how the title taps into social networks for newsgathering and community engagement.

The remainder of the day will feature a total of six sessions and three workshops for delegates to choose from. See the agenda for full details.

You can attend:

1A: Online video - with: Christian Heilmann, Mozilla Popcorn, @codepo8; Adam Westbrook, multimedia journalist, blogger and lecturer, @AdamWestbrook; Josh de la Mare, editor of video, Financial Times. More speakers to be announced.

or

1B: Paid-for content models – with: François Nel, researcher, academic and consultant on newsroom and digital business innovation, @francoisnel; Tom Standage, digital editor, the Economist, @tomstandage; Chris Newell, founder, ImpulsePay.

2A: Mobile reporting – with: Paul Gallagher, head of online content, the Manchester Evening News, @pdgallagher; Nick Martin, Sky News correspondent, @NickMartinSKY; Ben Fawkes, audio content manager, SoundCloud, @benfawkes; Christian Payne, social technologist, mobile story maker, @Documentally.

or

2B: Social media optimisation – with: Nate Lanxon, editor, Wired.co.uk, @NateLanxon; Chris Hamilton, social media editor, BBC News, @chrishams; Martin Belam, user experience lead, the Guardian, @currybet; Darren Waters, head of devices and social media, MSN UK, @darrenwaters.

Workshop A: Search engine optimisation skills – with: Malcolm Coles, digital production director, nationals, Trinity Mirror, @malcolmcoles.

or

Workshop B: Data journalism tools – with Simon Rogers, editor, Guardian Datablog and Datastore, @smfrogers, and Andy Cotgreave, senior product consultant, Tableau, @acotgreave.

or

Workshop C: Searching social media for news – with Nicola Hughes, Knight-Mozilla Fellow, the Guardian @DataMinerUK.

3A: Gaming mechanics in news – with: Bobby Schweizer, doctoral student at the Georgia Institute of Technology and co-author of Newsgames: Journalism at Play, @NewsgamesGT; Shannon Perkins, editor of interactive technologies, Wired.com; Al Trivino, director of innovation at News International, @alfredotrivino; Alastair Dant, interactive lead at the Guardian, @ajdant.

or

3B: Multiplatform stategy – with: Mike Goldsmith, editor-in-chief of iPad and tablet editions, Future Publishing, @mikegoldsmithDouglas Arellanes, technologist, consultant and the director of clients and services, Sourcefabric, @dougiegyro; the Guardian (speaker tbc). More speakers to be announced.

The final session will bring the whole conference together for a debate on setting social media standards – with: Laura Kuenssberg, business editor, ITV News, @ITVLauraK; Neal Mann, digital news editor, Sky News, @fieldproducer; Katherine Haddon, head of online, English, AFP, @khaddon; Tom McArthur, UK editor, Breakingnews.com, @TomMcArthur.

A drinks reception at the end of the conference will provide a chance to network.

January 09 2012

09:49

Announcing Tableau as latest sponsor of news:rewired – media in motion

Data visualisation tool Tableau is returning as sponsor of news:rewired – media in motion, Journalism.co.uk’s digital journalism conference.

The one-day conference, which takes place on Friday 3 February at MSN UK’s offices in Victoria, will look at the latest tools, strategies and approaches in online journalism and the use of digital technologies for innovative news production.

As well as panel sessions there will also be a workshop period within the conference agenda, looking in more details at specific topics including search engine optimisation and data journalism, with the help of industry experts.

Tableau’s senior product consultant Andy Cotgreave will be joining the data journalism workshop, to be given by the Guardian’s award winning data journalist Simon Rogers,and will showcase how Tableau can be used by journalists to create interactive charts and share them online.

“Tableau are delighted to be sponsoring news:rewired on 3 February,” Cotgreave said. “Our mission, to help people see and understand their data, is especially relevant to journalists who need to navigate their way through mountains of data quickly to discover the compelling stories hidden within.

“We look forward to sharing stories and learning how journalists are managing the deluge of data.”

As well as the Guardian, a number of news outlets use Tableau Public to produce interactive graphics, including the Wall Street Journal, the Huffington Post, the Washington Post and Argentina’s La Nación.

You can still buy tickets for news:rewired – media in motion for just £130 (+VAT). Book yours now at this link to avoid disappointment.

01:27

July 29 2011

19:49

Better to be first or right? - A false choice and an excuse

The Buttry Diary :: An editor asks by email a question Steve Buttry hears often as journalists address the challenges of digital journalism: Is it better to be first, or be right?” Three times recently, the editor said, his staff was beaten (not on breaking news), but the competition had major errors in its reports. “When we published, we got the stories right, though, again, not first,” the editor said."I regard this as a false choice," writes Steve Buttry.

[Steve Buttry:] I believe accuracy and verification become more important in digital journalism than in print journalism. The daily deadlines of print usually give you hours to nail down the facts before you have to publish. The constant deadlines of digital publishing mean that you publish when you have the facts verified

Better to be first or right?

Continue to read Steve Buttry, stevebuttry.wordpress.com

May 30 2011

02:04

March 02 2011

11:00

October 28 2010

07:48

Flyposting newspaper websites

Aaaaaaaarrrrrrggggggh!

Imagine the scene. I’m on the bus. I’ve found a seat that isn’t near the bloke who shouts at cars and smells vaguely of rabbits. My headphones are in (but not too loud,of course).

I take out my copy of the Birmingham Post and open it up. Scanning around the page I see an article that catches my eye. But just before I start reading…the person sat behind me pulls out a pot of wallpaper paste and slathers a great billboard poster across the top of the page.

It turns out that in scanning around I inadvertently caught the eye of an advert nestling in the corner of the page.

Sound plausable? No I didn’t think so.

So please stop doing it on your bloody websites newspaper people.

That is all.

October 16 2010

13:39

ScraperWiki: Hacks and Hackers day, Manchester.

If you’re not familiar with scraperwiki it’s ”all the tools you need for Screen Scraping, Data Mining & visualisation”.

These guys are working really hard at convincing Journos that data is their friend by staging a steady stream of events bringing together journos and programmers together to see what happens.

So I landed at NWVM’s offices to what seems like a mountain of laptops, fried food, coke and biscuits to be one of the judges of their latest hacks and hackers day in Manchester (#hhhmcr). I was expecting some interesting stuff. I wasn’t dissapointed.

The winners

We had to pick three prizes from the six of so projects started that day and here’s what we (Tom Dobson, Julian Tait and me)  ended up with.

The three winners, in reverse order:

Quarternote: A website that would ‘scrape’ myspace for band information. The idea was that you could put a location and style of music in to the system and it would compile a line-up of bands.

A great idea (although more hacker than hack) and if I was a dragon I would consider investing. These guys also won the Scraperwiki ‘cup’ award for actually being brave enough to have a go at scraping data from Myspace. Apparently myspace content has less structure than custard! The collective gasps from the geeks in the room when they said that was what they wanted to do underlined that.

Second was Preston’s summer of spend.  Local councils are supposed to make details of any invoice over 500 pounds available, and many have. But many don’t make the data very useable.  Preston City council is no exception. PDF’s!

With a little help from Scraperwiki the data was scraped, tidied and put in a spreadsheet and then organised. It through up some fun stuff – 1000 pounds to The Bikini Beach Band! And some really interesting areas for exploration – like a single payment of over 80,000 to one person (why?) – and I’m sure we’ll see more from this as the data gets a good running through.  A really good example of how a journo and a hacker can work together.

The winner was one of number of projects that took the tweets from the GMP 24hr tweet experiment; what one group titled ‘Genetically modified police’ tweeting :). Enrico Zini and Yuwei Lin built a searchable GMP24 tweet database (and a great write up of the process) of the tweets which allowed searching by location, keyword, all kinds of things. It was a great use of the data and the working prototype was impressive given the time they had.

Credit should go to Michael Brunton-Spall of the Guardian into a useable dataset which saved a lot of work for those groups using the tweets as the raw data for their projects.

Other projects included mapping deprivation in manchester and a legal website that if it comes off will really be one to watch. All brilliant stuff.

Hacks and hackers we need you

Give the increasing amount of raw data that organisations are pumping out journalists will find themselves vital in making sure that they stay accountable. But I said in an earlier post that good journalists don’t need to know how to do everything, they just need to know who to ask.

The day proved to me and, I think to lots of people there,  that asking a hacker to help sort data out is really worth it.

I’m sure there will be more blogs etc about the day appearing over the next few days.

Thanks to everyone concerned for asking me along.

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