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April 27 2012

13:04

Free Data Journalism Handbook launched tomorrow

Data Journalism Handbook

I’ve contributed to a “free, open-source book that aims to help journalists to use data to improve the news” – and it will be published online tomorrow (Saturday 28th April)

The Data Journalism Handbook was coordinated by the European Journalism Centre and the Open Knowledge Foundation (in particular Liliana Bounegru), and includes contributions from:

“Dozens of data journalism’s leading advocates and best practitioners – including from Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the BBC, the Chicago Tribune, Deutsche Welle, the Guardian, the Financial Times, Helsingin Sanomat, La Nacion, the New York Times, ProPublica, the Washington Post, the Texas Tribune, Verdens Gang, Wales Online, Zeit Online and many others.”

The book will be available for download at datajournalismhandbook.org under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License. There will also be a printed and e-book version published by O’Reilly Media.

13:04

Free Data Journalism Handbook launched tomorrow

Data Journalism Handbook

I’ve contributed to a “free, open-source book that aims to help journalists to use data to improve the news” – and it will be published online tomorrow (Saturday 28th April)

The Data Journalism Handbook was coordinated by the European Journalism Centre and the Open Knowledge Foundation (in particular Liliana Bounegru), and includes contributions from:

“Dozens of data journalism’s leading advocates and best practitioners – including from Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the BBC, the Chicago Tribune, Deutsche Welle, the Guardian, the Financial Times, Helsingin Sanomat, La Nacion, the New York Times, ProPublica, the Washington Post, the Texas Tribune, Verdens Gang, Wales Online, Zeit Online and many others.”

The book will be available for download at datajournalismhandbook.org under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License. There will also be a printed and e-book version published by O’Reilly Media.

September 23 2010

09:45

#picnic10: Watch the Future of Journalism session live

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) has a great line up of speakers for today’s PICNIC conference – “a renowned festival-cum-conference that blurs the lines between creativity, science, technology, business and society”.

The programme features a keynote speech from Jeff Jarvis, director of the interactive programme at City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism, hot on the heels of CUNY’s new entrepreneurial journalism plans.

Mark Glaser, executive editor of MediaShift, will focus on the successes and failures of traditional media when it comes to digital; while new City University London lecturer Paul Bradshaw will set out a journalism curriculum for the 21st century.

The full programme is available via the EJC’s event page and you can watch a live stream of the day’s events below:

ejcnet on livestream.com. Broadcast Live Free

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August 24 2010

10:38

Amateur media watchdogs helping keep newspapers in check

While a handful of established groups shoulder the responsibility of holding news and media organisations to account, the internet has fueled the growth of the individual online watchdog, according to an interesting post on the European Journalism Centre website.

Author Jamie Thunder, an Investigative Journalism MA student at City University uses several examples to illustrate the biggest media bloggers within the online community, such as Tabloid Watch, Five Chinese Crackers, Angry Mob and Enemies of Reason.

‘Watchdog’ groups are nothing new to the media. But these blogs are different. There’s no unifying political ideology, and they’re maintained alongside full-time jobs. They’re not run by media theorists or political activists – just individuals stirred to action by the daily iniquities of the press.

He says that while they accept their impact on the papers themselves will be minimal, it’s the online “groundswell” among readers which is where their power lies.

We all know the media landscape is shifting, and shifting fast – paywalls, user-generated content, and Wikileaks are just three recent developments. Yet little has been said about the increasing ability for non-journalists to analyse and publicise the press’s problems (…) And as long as newspapers keep misbehaving, they’re not going away.

See his full post here…Similar Posts:



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