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August 30 2012

13:13

Post-Disaster, We Can Do More Than 'Feed It to Fix It'

Did something go wrong? Bring a casserole. While the type of barbeque may vary regionally, if you're standing near storm damage, there's likely a home-cooked meal on the way. Following a disaster, competent ladies fill church and school kitchens, turning out hundreds of sandwiches. Restaurants donate buffet trays of wings and lasagna. Community organizations host spaghetti dinner after spaghetti dinner, feeding survivors
and volunteers alike. Quite simply, we live in a casserole culture, and we can harness this tendency for a better local response.

Why, exactly, our knee-jerk reaction as a culture is to bake a pie in the face of
unthinkable loss, is anyone's guess. I have a theory that our Norman Rockwell tendencies are linked directly to what we are told we can and cannot do after a disaster.

'feed it to fix it'

Unless you happened to keep the FEMA National Incident Management Framework around for bedtime reading, you probably have no clue who is in charge of what on the ground after a disaster. Even if you do know what is supposed to happen, the practice is often far different than the plan. As an unaffiliated volunteer, you're often sent home, told off, or simply not answered when you try to help.

foodbank.jpeg

But food -- that makes sense. The Red Cross won't accept home-cooked donations, but local churches will. You're greeted with thanks instead of confusion if you drop off sandwiches and Gatorade at a worksite. We, as a culture, have assumed permission to feed during a disaster, and we get after it. Think: Studs Terkel meets Paula Deen.

I, like you, love a good plate of mashed potatoes. But our "feed it to fix it" tendencies right now fall short of our potential to help out at the community level. Here are a few suggestions for building a better community recovery:

Use your skills

Yes, you can cook. But are you also a lawyer? Bilingual? Great with computers? Those skills are every bit as necessary to the recovery as Dunkin Donuts -- survivors will need tax advice, translation and resource management help.

Use your head

The difference between lasagna and labor is that it is currently a painful process to volunteer skills through large, regional organizations. Your community can independently plan to share skills and resources before a disaster -- just agree upon a system beforehand.

Use your leaders

Your emergency management department and city leadership can use your help. Can you start a Community Emergency Response team? Would you agree to help the EM run social media during a disaster? Get in touch and plan ahead!

Use this recipe: the singular best recipe for chocolate chip recovery cookies I have ever
encountered:

Catastrophe Cookies

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3/4 cup tightly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 large egg, at room temperature, lightly beaten
  • 6 to 7 ounces of chocolate chips
  • Preheat oven to 350 F.
  • Cream butter and sugar together in a large bowl.
  • Add the vanilla and egg, keep on mixing.
  • Mix dry ingredients together, then add slowly to the large bowl of wet ingredients.
  • If you're patient, refrigerate the dough for a couple of hours.
  • If not, just go ahead and bake those cookies for 11-13 minutes.
  • Distribute to sweaty workers, affected families, stressed organizers, and your own family.

P.S. Check out our work in action this week at http://IsaacGulf.Recovers.org.

Caitria O'Neill is the CEO of Recovers.org. She received a B.A. degree in government from Harvard University in 2011. She has worked for Harvard Law Review and the U.S. State Department, and brings legal, political and editorial experience to the team. O'Neill has completed the certificate programs for FEMA's National Incident Management System 700 and 800, and Incident Command Systems 100 and 200. She has also worked with Emergency Management Directors, regional hospital and public health organizations and regional Homeland Security chapters to develop partnerships and educate stakeholders about local organization and communication following disasters.

August 20 2012

01:36

March 15 2011

16:12

Cardiff Hacks and Hackers Hacks Day

What’s occurin’? Loads in fact, at our first Welsh Hacks and Hackers Hack Day! From schools from space to catering college’s with a Food Safety Standard of 2, we had an amazing day.

We got five teams:

Co-Ordnance – This project aimed to be a local business tracker. They wanted to make the London Stock Exchange code into meaningful data, but alas, the stock exchange prevents scraping. So they decided to use company data from registers like the LSE and Companies House to extract business information and structure it for small businesses who need to know best place to set up and for local business activists.

The team consisted of 3 hacks (Steve Fossey, Eva Tallaksen from Intrafish and Gareth Morlais from BBC Cymru) and 3 hackers (Carey HilesCraig Marvelley and Warren Seymour, all from Box UK).

It’s a good thing they had some serious hackers as they had a serious hack on their hands. Here’s a scraper they did for the London Stock Exchange ticker. And here’s what they were able to get done in just one day!

This was just a locally hosted site but the map did allow users to search for types of businesses by region, see whether they’d been dissolved and by what date.

Open Senedd – This project aimed to be a Welsh version of TheyWorkforYou. A way for people in Wales to find out how assembly members voted in plenary meetings. It tackles the worthy task of making assembly members voting records accessible and transparent.

The team consisted of 2 hacks (Daniel Grosvenor from CLIConline and Hannah Waldram from Guardian Cardiff) and 2 hackers (Nathan Collins and Matt Dove).

They spent the day hacking away and drew up an outline for www.opensenedd.org.uk. We look forward to the birth of their project! Which may or may not look something like this (left). Minus Coke can and laptop hopefully!

They took on a lot for a one day project but devolution will not stop the ScraperWiki digger!

There’s no such thing as a free school meal – This project aimed to extract information on Welsh schools from inspection reports. This involved getting unstructure Estyn reports on all 2698 Welsh schools into ScraperWiki.

The team consisted of 1 hack (Izzy Kaminski) and 2 astronomer hackers (Edward Gomez and Stuart Lowe from LCOGT).

This small team managed to scrape Welsh schools data (which the next team stole!) and had time to make a heat map of schools in Wales. This was done using some sort of astronomical tool. Their longer term aim is to overlay the map with information on child poverty and school meals. A worthy venture and we wish them well.

Ysgoloscope – This project aimed to be a Welsh version of Schooloscope. It’s aim was to make accessible and interactive information about schools for parents to explore. It used Edward’s scraper of horrible PDF Estyn inspection reports. These had different rating methodology to Ofsted (devolution is not good for data journalism!).

The team consisted of 6 hacks (Joni Ayn Alexander, Chris Bolton, Bethan James from the Stroke Association, Paul Byers, Geraldine Nichols and Rachel Howells), 1 hacker (Ben Campbell from Media Standards Trust) and 1 troublemaker (Esko Reinikainen).

Maybe it was a case to too many hacks or just trying to narrow down what area of local government to tackle but the result was a plan. Here is their presentation and I’m sure parents all over wales are hoping to see Ysgoloscope up and running.

Blasus – This project aimed to map food hygiene rating over Wales. They wanted to correlate this information with deprivation indices. They noticed that the Food Standards Agency site does not work. Not for this purpose which is most useful.

The team consisted of 4 hacks (Joe Goodden from the BBC, Alyson Fielding, Charlie Duff from HRZone and Sophie Paterson from the ATRiuM) and 1 hacker (Dafydd Vaughan from CF Labs).

As you can see below they created something which they presented on the day. They used this scraper and made an interactive map with food hygiene ratings, symbols and local information. Amazing for just a day’s work!

And the winners are… (drum roll please)

  • 1st Prize: Blasus
  • 2nd Prize: Open Senedd
  • 3rd Prize: Co-Ordnance
  • Best Scoop: Blasus for finding  a catering college in Merthyr with a Food Hygiene Standard rating of just 2
  • Best Scraper: Co-Ordnance

A big shout out

To our judges Glyn Mottershead from Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, Gwawr Hughes from Skillset and Sean Clarke from The Guardian.

And our sponsors Skillset, Guardian Platform, Guardian Local and Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies.

Schools, businesses and eating place of Wales – you’ve been ScraperWikied!


February 17 2011

14:29

Sourcemap'd: Grain Drain in the Rocky Mountain West

(This is part of what we hope will be a larger series; a more comprehensive look at the communities using Sourcemap and those interesting uses they have developed.)

The University of Montana's School of Journalism collaborated with us over the past term by using Sourcemap as part of a class on online news. Our collaborator, Lee Banville, wanted to connect journalism students in his class with tools and technologies that construct perspectives and develop narrative frameworks for the web. In practice, this ranged from ideas on crowd-sourced feedback and commentary to devices like web mapping that drive new presentations of stories.

The students focused on local food issues. Montana suffers from "grain drain." Despite the heavy production of raw ingredients, there isn't any food processing done in the state. This has created a reliance on the import of grain and beef products from other sources, sometimes in a cyclical supply chain. In order to understand this problem, students used two different technologies and drew on the communities around them. They used Sourcemap to map products that touch on local food production and consumption—products that are sourced or consumed within the state. They also used the American Public Media's Public Insight Network, a community developed to find diverse news sources and increase the range of available perspectives in reporting. By partnering with tens and thousands of experts and members of the public who have agreed to support news coverage, they are able to construct stories with richer detail and dialogue.

The efforts of these student journalists were recently covered by New West, running stories that describe the local food movement and agricultural shifts shaping the region. This series (linked below) was written and edited by students. These articles represent only a piece of the cross cutting investigation into the story of food production and consumption in Montana and the American Rocky Mountains.

This project underscores our interest in a transparent approach to understanding the geography of production. What we eat and where it comes from can have profound effects on our communities. It also furthers our interest (and the interests of the Center) in "fragile" communities that are (perceptually at least) more geographically isolated. While Sourcemap can contribute to the research process for this kind of work, we need continued collaboration with journalists and investigators who can appropriately contextualize these supply chains—to tell us how "where things come from" changes how we live.

As part of their investigation, students researched sourcemaps of diverse products and their impact in Montana:

Student Sourcemaps

-
Matthew is the Cofounder and Director of Sourcemap.org.

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