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July 27 2011

04:53

How to - 9 successful ways to get rid of your readers (maybe forever)

Brad Colbow is a web designer and illustrator. He collected 9 visual examples found on the web to illustrate pitfalls of web design, things you should avoid if you care of what your readers want and if you like to build compelling news sites. One thing I regularely stumble upon is the abundance of social media buttons on web pages. Nothing is more confusing than millions of buttons, which overpopulate a page. Second, I'm on your side, we need advertising space. But if your (hopefully) originally content takes up less than 20% I'm sure your readers will find it hard to figure out, why they should come back to your site.

Have a look at the other 7 "ways why newspapers die" Brad Colbow, bradcolbow.com

January 14 2011

17:00

Gizmodo taps illustrators to give stories more punch, pop, pow!

When Gizmodo editorial director Brian Lam was planning for this week’s coverage of the Verizon iPhone, he didn’t think in words. He visualized it entirely in images, daydreaming about how much more emotive pictures and sounds can be than straight-laced text: A Ken Burns-style montage of past newspaper stories predicting iPhone’s migration; a video of AT&T’s greatest failures; customers expressing frustration layered with soulful, gut-wrenching music.

On Tuesday, the editorial package still featured a lot of text — Gizmodo ran a series of traditional news and service pieces plus a one-minute rant — but Gizmodo did have some original art: a Verizon-red light dawning over the shiny iPhone (“At Last”) and a projectile phone crashing through the telecom’s Manhattan headquarters (“Will the iPhone Crush Verizon’s Network?”).

Most online journalism privileges text over all else. But to help Gizmodo differentiate itself from the countless other technology sites around, since early summer, contributing illustrators and guest artists have been whipping up hundreds of visual pieces for Gizmodo. And the response has only made Lam’s love of the visual grow stronger. “If I needed to, I would have napkin sketches done,” he says. Cartoons, illustrations, and drawings can add a nice touch in the Internet environment where text stories are aggregated, chopped up, syndicated or simply re-skinned and re-written without giving credit. Art, on the other hand, is treated as a more proprietary piece of intellectual property and can catch a reader’s eye, build a brand’s signature style, and help tell the story. Plus it can also be a cheaper, more flexible alternative to original photography.

At the recent Consumer Electronics Show, Gizmodo wrote about Lady Gaga’s Polaroid glasses, but there was no picture of her with them. “How much would [a photo shoot] cost? Thousands of dollars, weeks to set up?” Lam asks rhetorically. Perhaps, but Lam didn’t have to go that route. Instead, Sam Spratt, a 22-year-old contributing illustrator, drew the Gaga image above in half an hour.

Spratt has been working with Gawker since July and was onsite at CES, but he typically creates from a home studio, another advantage of hand-drawn art. Like journalists who can gather information, sources, and anecdotes with just a phone and computer, illustrators don’t always have to be on location to create original, entertaining, and informative content. Wendy MacNaughton, a San Francisco-based cartoonist who spent a month working with Gawker, drew the clever Fission vs. Fusion sidebar (left, click for the full image), which for many will be light years more engaging than a string of quotes from a CERN scientist. “They’re the shiny objects that hook people in enough to see the real meat of the package: the article,” Spratt says of his drawings. (Readers simply ignore stock images.)

Bang for the buck

Visuals are already a Gawker signature — its editorial teams mine the Web for colorful images to fill image-heavy layout. Still, Lam, who came to Gizmodo from Wired in 2006, pushed founder Nick Denton to fund original art. “Every year, we discuss budgets, and I said, ‘You really think another writer on top of a ten-person staff is going to make a difference?’” Lam recalls. In 2007, Gizmodo brought on Jesus Diaz, a writer and editor with a background in visual and graphic arts. He frequently built images in Photoshop, created unique infographics and timelines. “There was a lot of punch in those posts,” Lam says of Diaz’ work. “You just start to dream visually from that point on.”

To fulfill that dream, Gawker started adding creative personnel. MacNaughton came on for a month last summer, painting 15 water colors including a biting take on the iPhone 4 and the classic infographic for No Sleep ‘Til Fusion. Chris McVeigh, who worked with Gizmodo for a couple of months, built and photographer Lego dioramas. Both artists add beautiful visual originality to text, a complement that’ll only get more vital as we move toward tablets and Internet TV.

The difference between another writer and an illustrator is most apparent with Spratt, though, who has done more than 400 pieces since July. There’s pure editorial work (like Verizon and Gaga), but he also helps make Gawker Media’s community-engagement more robust. For a Halloween contest, he painted an eerie father-and-son piece, and last month, Spratt rewarded Facebook fans by painting 14 of their profile pictures. The recent Savannah College of Art & Design grad maintains his own Facebook page — 4,300+ fans — and a formspring that attracts aspiring artists, supporters, and a more than a handful of swooning women.

The takeaway: Illustration matters

As with Gawker Artists, the company’s use of visuals makes the site more vibrant, engaging, interesting, and unique. It also allows for more flexible editorial modeling and attracts a wider audience than, in the case of Gizmodo, gadget writing alone. There is nothing to fear by bringing on illustrators. If we’re wary of mixing cartoons with traditional journalism, we shouldn’t be — just look at The New Yorker’s fantastic work, their extensive lines of mugs, diaries, prints, umbrellas, postcards, and calendars. We already know our audience loves illustrations — Avatar is the highest-grossing film of all time, and The Simpsons is the longest-running show on TV. “The longer I work at Gawker, it really encourages you to go with your gut,” says Lam. “I think that everyone should try to do this.”

January 09 2011

15:25

MEMORABLE COVERS: MARX AND SPENDERS

Today’s Sunday Times Magazine shows three basic publishing rules:

1. Great illustrations produce great covers.

2. Great headlines produce great covers.

3. Great cover stories need great content.

Well, the first two rules are in this fabulous cover.

The last one, no.

The story is interesting but doesn’t deliver what the cover promised: the urban lifestyle of the British “gauche caviar” lead by an Ed Miliband owning a &1.6 million house in North London’s Hamstead Heath.

But Stephen Collins illustration shows that, yes, covers can be and must be memorable.

This one will be a collectors magazine cover.

Mine will be on eBay very soon.

So, wait and bid!

November 02 2010

03:04

Century-old Rubino


Illustrations (mostly magazine covers) circa 1906 - 1910 by Antonio Rubino

01 Antonio Rubino, 1908, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica
Antonio Rubino, 1908, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica



02 Antonio Rubino, 1906, cover for Polka du Jasmin
Antonio Rubino, 1906, cover for Polka du Jasmin



03 Antonio Rubino, 1910, cover for Il segreti d'amore al confessionale
Antonio Rubino, 1910, cover for Il segreti d'amore al confessionale



04 Antonio Rubino, 1908, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica
Antonio Rubino, 1908, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica



05 Antonio Rubino, 1906, cover for Dan-y-Don
Antonio Rubino, 1906, cover for Dan-y-Don



06 Antonio Rubino, 1909, original illustration for the cover of Il giornalino della Domenica
Antonio Rubino, 1909, original illustration for the cover of Il giornalino della Domenica



07 Antonio Rubino, ca. 1907, cover for Delfina
Antonio Rubino, ca. 1907, cover for Delfina



08 Antonio Rubino, 1906, cover for Il Re Olaf (ballet)
Antonio Rubino, 1906, cover for Il Re Olaf (ballet)



09 Antonio Rubino, 1907, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica
Antonio Rubino, 1907, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica



10 Antonio Rubino, 1907, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica
Antonio Rubino, 1907, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica



11 Antonio Rubino, 1908, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica
Antonio Rubino, 1908, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica



12 Antonio Rubino, 1906, cover for Maggiolata
Antonio Rubino, 1906, cover for Maggiolata



13 Antonio Rubino, 1907, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica
Antonio Rubino, 1907, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica



14 Antonio Rubino, 1907, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica
Antonio Rubino, 1907, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica



15 Antonio Rubino, 1907, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica
Antonio Rubino, 1907, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica



16 Antonio Rubino, 1908, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica
Antonio Rubino, 1908, cover for Il giornalino della Domenica

These scans come from the heavily-illustrated coffee-table book Antonio Rubino: I Libri Illustrati, edited by Santo Alligo. Here are some links for the Italian illustrator Antonio Rubino (1880 - 1964):
--Comics from Coconino-World.com
--Italian photo gallery
--post at Lambiek.com
--kid's room decorated by Rubino

Previously:
Salvador Bartolozzi (long overdue for another post)
Antonio Rubino, a couple scans from 1928 books
Mussolini's Toothpaste


March 10 2010

15:28

An Elizabethan Bestiary Retold


01 An Elizabethan Bestiary - Retold, by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson (The Elephant)
The Elephant
from An Elizabethan Bestiary: Retold by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson



An Elizabethan Bestiary: Retold was published by Horse & Buggy Press in 1999, in an edition of just 1000 copies. The book primarily consists of Jeffery Beam's poems (reworkings of bestiaries found in The Elizabethan Zoo) and Ippy Patterson's illustrations. You can read a lot about it on Jeffery's site. I have featured here ten of the thirty beasts. (Many thanks to the authors for sharing their work here.)

Though the book has been out-of-print for a few years, Jeffery and Ippy hope to eventually find a publisher who will reprint it for a more general market.

Ippy is working on "The BoogeyMan," a scary adult/children's book which I hope to feature soon (she sent me a few stunning pages). Jeffery might work on a children's book with Penny Davenport (!).


02 An Elizabethan Bestiary - Retold, by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson (The Gorgon)
The Gorgon
from An Elizabethan Bestiary: Retold by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson




03 An Elizabethan Bestiary - Retold, by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson (The Whale)
The Whale
from An Elizabethan Bestiary: Retold by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson



04 An Elizabethan Bestiary - Retold, by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson (The Camel)
The Camel
from An Elizabethan Bestiary: Retold by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson



05 An Elizabethan Bestiary - Retold, by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson (The Boa)
The Boa
from An Elizabethan Bestiary: Retold by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson



06 An Elizabethan Bestiary - Retold, by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson (The Vulgar Bugill)
The Vulgar Bugill
from An Elizabethan Bestiary: Retold by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson



07 An Elizabethan Bestiary - Retold, by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson (The Manticore)
The Manticore
from An Elizabethan Bestiary: Retold by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson



08 An Elizabethan Bestiary - Retold, by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson (The Hydra)
The Hydra
from An Elizabethan Bestiary: Retold by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson



09 An Elizabethan Bestiary - Retold, by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson (The Su)
The Su
from An Elizabethan Bestiary: Retold by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson



10 An Elizabethan Bestiary - Retold, by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson (The Cockatrice)
The Cockatrice
from An Elizabethan Bestiary: Retold by Jeffery Beam, illustrations by Ippy Patterson




March 08 2010

03:09

Myth Mad Adventures in the Print Trade


01 Marcel Roux, L'enfant et la Mort
Marcel Roux, L'enfant et la Mort
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade



Neil Philip, the man behind Adventures in the Print Trade, is a writer who also runs the print gallery Idbury Prints. His blog is a visual feast and an important art history resource.

Please follow the links to read the story behind each image.


02 Franz Stuck - Lucifer, c. 1890
Franz Stuck - Lucifer, c. 1890
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




03 Dorothea Tanning, La Marée IV
Dorothea Tanning, La Marée IV
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




04 Lucien Boucher, Le Toboggan
Lucien Boucher, Le Toboggan
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




05 Lucien Boucher, La Pharmacie
Lucien Boucher, La Pharmacie
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




06 Eric Ravilious, Pharmaceutical Chemist
Eric Ravilious, Pharmaceutical Chemist
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




07 Lill Tschudi, 1941 linocut
Lill Tschudi, 1941 linocut
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




08 Jacob Epstein, A Mournful Madrigal, 1940
Jacob Epstein, A Mournful Madrigal, 1940
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




09 Édouard Chimot, Ce sont les autres qui meurent, 1921
Édouard Chimot, Ce sont les autres qui meurent, 1921
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




10 Ghislaine de Menten de Horne, Qui pleure là
Ghislaine de Menten de Horne, Qui pleure là
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




11 Hermine David, drypoint for an edition of Sagesse by Paul Verlaine, published in 1943 by Creuzevault, Paris
Hermine David, drypoint for an edition of Sagesse by Paul Verlaine, published in 1943 by Creuzevault, Paris
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




12 Georges Gorvel, Rue du Cherche-Midi (Impression)
Georges Gorvel, Rue du Cherche-Midi (Impression)
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




13 Felix Vallotton, 1902, Salute first, it’s the Prefect’s car
Felix Vallotton, 1902, Salute first, it’s the Prefect’s car
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




14 Frans de Geetere, Mes Communions II
Frans de Geetere, Mes Communions II
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




15 Alexandre Ralli, Marché aux puces
Alexandre Ralli, Marché aux puces
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




16 Walter Spitzer, Bull's Head, 1963, Lithograph for Les Bestiares by Henri de Montherlant
Walter Spitzer, Bull's Head, 1963, Lithograph for Les Bestiares by Henri de Montherlant
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




17 François Lunven (1942-1971), Poète aux interstices, 1972 lithograph
François Lunven (1942-1971), Poète aux interstices, 1972 lithograph
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




18 Miroslav Houra, Prometheus, 1973 linocut
Miroslav Houra, Prometheus, 1973 linocut
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




19 Edmond Heuzé, Père Ubu rides to war
Edmond Heuzé, Père Ubu rides to war
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




20 Pierre Jacquot, The Fool, original lithograph
Pierre Jacquot, The Fool, original lithograph
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade




21 Arnaud d'Hauterives, Qu'est-ce qu l'amour
Arnaud d'Hauterives, Qu'est-ce qu l'amour
see the original post on Adventures in the Print Trade


Thank you Neil for sharing your prints here.


March 01 2010

01:27

Image Dive 5


Bruno Munari, 1970, Presence of the Ancestors 1
Bruno Munari, 1970, Presence of the Ancestors 1



Stephen Gooden, illus. Aesop's Fables, 1936
Stephen Gooden, illus. Aesop's Fables, 1936



Blair Hughes-Stanton, wood engraving for Alone by Walter de la Mare
Blair Hughes-Stanton, wood engraving for Alone by Walter de la Mare
from the collection of Richard Sica


Blair Hughes-Stanton, wood engraving for Alone by Walter de la Mare
Blair Hughes-Stanton, wood engraving for Alone by Walter de la Mare
from the collection of Richard Sica



Cyril E. Power, The Vortex, 1929 (color linocut)
Cyril E. Power, The Vortex, 1929 (color linocut)



Sybil Andrews, The Gale, 1930 (color linocut)
Sybil Andrews, The Gale, 1930 (color linocut)

The above two images come from the book Rhythms of Modern Life: British Prints 1914 - 1939.


Etienne Delessert, illus. for Ionesco, Story Number 2, 1970
Etienne Delessert, illus. for Ionesco, Story Number 2, 1970

Excluded from my posts of French kids' books (1, 2) because of the late date.


Kees Van Dongen, pochoir illus. for Hassan Badreddine el Bassraoui, 1926
Kees Van Dongen, pochoir illus. for Hassan Badreddine el Bassraoui, 1926



Louis Wain, from Tinker Tailor
Louis Wain, from Tinker Tailor



Roland Topor, Popiersie, color lithography
Roland Topor, Popiersie, color lithography



Werner Klemke, The Golden Spider, Film poster, East Germany. From Graphis Annual 59-60
Werner Klemke, The Golden Spider, Film poster, East Germany. From Graphis Annual 59-60
compliments of Sandi Vincent (see her flickr and tumblr)


Hayv Kahrman, Fashion in the UAE 11
Hayv Kahraman, Fashion in the UAE 11

It was really hard to select only ten images for this post of Hayv's work, so here's another one. Visit her website.


Hermann Finsterlin, Die Insel der Sirene, 1917
Hermann Finsterlin, Die Insel der Sirene, 1917

One of my favorite posts is Wandering from Organ to Organ with Hermann Finsterlin. Read those quotes!



Humoristische Karte von Europa im Jahre 1870
Humoristische Karte von Europa im Jahre 1870



Map caricature
Map caricature

I cannot remember the name of the book the above two maps come from. It was a giant 1980s German-language book on caricature.


Jan Marcin Szancer, Proj. kostiumu nr 26 do "Symfonii Fantastycznej," watercolor, gouache
Jan Marcin Szancer, Proj. kostiumu nr 26 do "Symfonii Fantastycznej," watercolor, gouache

Intense work from Szancer, whose children's books I featured twice before.


Mervyn Peake, illus. for Joad
Mervyn Peake, illus. for The adventures of the young soldier in search of the better world by C.E.M. Joad, 1943

Recommended purchase: Mervyn Peake: The Man and His Art (I don't think anything from this odd little book is included)


Mervyn Peake, illus. for Joad 2
Mervyn Peake, illus. for The adventures of the young soldier in search of the better world by C.E.M. Joad, 1943



Martyrdom of St. Denis by Leon Bonnat
Martyrdom of St. Denis by Leon Bonnat
from the collection of Richard Sica


Richard Sica, Death
Richard Sica, Death

A personal work by frequent AJRMS contributor Richard Sica


Russian book cover
Russian book cover



Sinedeg Gandolgor, Za blagodenie chitrostu, 1973
Sinedeg Gandolgor, Za blagodenie chitrostu, 1973



Felix Labisse, illustration for Desnos poem, 1944
Felix Labisse, illustration for Desnos poem, 1944



Hadiah-i Shah-i Parian, Layla Iman (Ahi)
Hadiah-i Shah-i Parian, Layla Iman (Ahi)

Leftover from Iranian Kids' Books 3


Josef Lada, illus. for Svet Kricka by Petr Kricka, 1936
Josef Lada, illus. for Svet Kricka by Petr Kricka, 1936

I featured Lada in this post.


Josef Lada, Kalamajika - Rikadla a drobne pribehy, 1936
Josef Lada, Kalamajika - Rikadla a drobne pribehy, 1936



Kay Nielsen, illus. for De ce feu sortit un petit oiseau, 1929
Kay Nielsen, illus. for De ce feu sortit un petit oiseau, 1929

Printed in an edition of 400, this seems to be harder-to-find than many of Nielsen's books


Design ideas by Benedictus, printed in pochoir by Jean Saude, 1930
Design ideas by Benedictus, printed in pochoir by Jean Saude, 1930



Mr. Ed, Vivo poster
Mr. Ed, Vivo poster

See more of Mr. Ed's work.


kapitankamikaze, czacha
via kapitan kamikaze

Check out Kapitan Kamikaze's skull signs



Bruno Munari, 1970, Presence of the Ancestors 2
Bruno Munari, 1970, Presence of the Ancestors 2


Previous dives: 1, 2, 3, 4

A reminder that I'm now posting images on tumblr



February 26 2010

07:58

VINTAGE DESIGN OR BACK TO THE BASICS: DRAWAING AND COMMUNICATING WITH INSPIRATION, CREATIVITY, COLOR & TYPE.

FT-1958-1

This blog is like a virtual museum of vintage design.

A fantastic clearinghouse for brilliant and simple ideas.

Illustration and design at their best.

A visual treasure.

Really inspirational.

Enjoy and taste it!

2769-34

2261-16

1704-59

0147-95

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4364703296_19f771bbdc

3199354666_a214384953

TadSigurRosGold

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2352334988_83b2932dfa

2360407257_9dc3ea3267

facebook

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February 08 2010

05:32

The Takeo Takei Lab of Ornithology


01 Takeo Takei, 1974
Takeo Takei, 1974



02 Takeo Takei, 1967
Takeo Takei, 1967



03 Takeo Takei, 1968
Takeo Takei, 1968



04 Takeo Takei, 1969
Takeo Takei, 1969



05 Takeo Takei, 1970
Takeo Takei, 1970



06 Takeo Takei, 1973
Takeo Takei, 1973

Works by one of my favorite artists, Takeo Takei (1894-1982). These prints come from one of the jewels of my collection -- a handmade artist book that a friend found for me on a recent trip to Japan. It would be nice to own the original prints, but that is never going to happen.

If you want to buy all 139 handmade books by Takeo Takei and have $45,000 to spare, go here.

Click images to view enlarged.

This artist featured in previous posts:

--Takeo Takei - Children's Day in Japan, 1936
--Forty-five thousand dollar leftovers
--Oedipus at Hiroshima
--Early 20th century Japanese magazine covers
--Early 20th century Japanese book covers

Japanese design in previous posts:

--Give Us Back Man - Japanese Graphic Design
--Japan's First Illustrated Book
--Mad Men and Friends
--Yukihiko Tajima's Gion Matsuri
--Eraserhead vs. Protractorhead
--The Wonders of Life on Earth - Yokoo details


November 05 2009

03:17

The Wonderful Wizards of Lodz


Kid's Books from Poland, part 1

J. M. Szancer, illus. for Lokomotywa by Julian Tuwim (Poland, 1954)
J. M. Szancer, illus. for Lokomotywa by Julian Tuwim (Poland, 1954)


J. M. Szancer, illus. for Lokomotywa by Julian Tuwim (Poland, 1954)
J. M. Szancer, illus. for Lokomotywa by Julian Tuwim (Poland, 1954)


J. M. Szancer, illus. for Lokomotywa by Julian Tuwim (Poland, 1954)
J. M. Szancer, illus. for Lokomotywa by Julian Tuwim (Poland, 1954)


J. M. Szancer, illus. for Lokomotywa by Julian Tuwim, title page (Poland, 1954)
J. M. Szancer, illus. for Lokomotywa by Julian Tuwim (Poland, 1954), title page


J. M. Szancer, cover illus. for Lokomotywa by Julian Tuwim (Poland, 1954)
J. M. Szancer, cover illus. for Lokomotywa by Julian Tuwim (Poland, 1954)


J.M. Szancer, illus. for Abecadlo Krakowski by Chotomska (Poland)
J.M. Szancer, illus. for Abecadlo Krakowski by Chotomska (Poland)


J.M. Szancer, cover illus. for Abecadlo Krakowski by Chotomska (Poland)
J.M. Szancer, cover illus. for Abecadlo Krakowski by Chotomska (Poland)


J. M. Szancer, illus. for Podroze Pana Kleksa by Jan Brzechwa (Poland, 1965)
J. M. Szancer, illus. for Podroze Pana Kleksa by Jan Brzechwa (Poland, 1965)


J. M. Szancer, illus. for Podroze Pana Kleksa by Jan Brzechwa (Poland, 1965)
J. M. Szancer, illus. for Podroze Pana Kleksa by Jan Brzechwa (Poland, 1965)


M. Mackiewicz, illus. for Jak Kotek Zwierzatka Mlekiem Czestowal (Poland, 1958), cover
M. Mackiewicz, illus. for Jak Kotek Zwierzatka Mlekiem Czestowal (Poland, 1958), cover


M. Mackiewicz, illus. for Jak Kotek Zwierzatka Mlekiem Czestowal (Poland, 1958)
M. Mackiewicz, illus. for Jak Kotek Zwierzatka Mlekiem Czestowal (Poland, 1958)


M. Mackiewicz, illus. for Jak Kotek Zwierzatka Mlekiem Czestowal (Poland, 1958)
M. Mackiewicz, illus. for Jak Kotek Zwierzatka Mlekiem Czestowal (Poland, 1958)


M. Mackiewicz, illus. for Jak Kotek Zwierzatka Mlekiem Czestowal (Poland, 1958)
M. Mackiewicz, illus. for Jak Kotek Zwierzatka Mlekiem Czestowal (Poland, 1958)


M. Mackiewicz, illus. for Jak Kotek Zwierzatka Mlekiem Czestowal (Poland, 1958)
M. Mackiewicz, illus. for Jak Kotek Zwierzatka Mlekiem Czestowal (Poland, 1958)


Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958) cover
Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958) cover


Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958)
Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958)


Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958)
Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958)


Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958)
Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958)


Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958)
Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958)


Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958)
Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958)


Zdzislaw Witwicki, illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958), back cover
Zdzislaw Witwicki, cover illus. for Kto w lesie mieszka by Czeslaw Janczarski (Poland, 1958)


Polish kid's book, back cover, 1960
Polish kid's book, back cover, 1960


Halina Gutsche, illus. for Cztery Male Krasnoludki by Janczarski 1 (Poland, 1959)
Halina Gutsche, illus. for Cztery Male Krasnoludki by Janczarski (Poland, 1959)


Halina Gutsche, illus. for Cztery Male Krasnoludki by Janczarski (Poland, 1959)
Halina Gutsche, illus. for Cztery Male Krasnoludki by Janczarski (Poland, 1959)


Halina Gutsche, illus. for Cztery Male Krasnoludki by Janczarski, back cover (Poland, 1959)
Halina Gutsche, illus. for Cztery Male Krasnoludki by Janczarski (Poland, 1959), back cover

Post unfortunately not sponsored by the City of Łódź

You might also enjoy these previous features:




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Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl