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July 02 2013

00:41
How to write a Ted Talk


How to write a Ted Talk

Tags: innovation

June 27 2013

19:13
Yahoo News has redesigned it’s site. It looks very similar...


Yahoo News has redesigned it’s site.

It looks very similar to the new home page, including a customizable news stream.

Mike Kerns, Vice President, Product, says:

"We made the news stream customizable so you can tell us what content you’d like to see more of. Yahoo! News will get smarter over time - the more you use it when signed in with your Yahoo! ID, the more it learns about your preferences, creating a personal news hub just for you."

June 24 2013

14:21

Facebook aims to become a 'newspaper for mobile' with new app

Facebook aims to become a 'newspaper for mobile' with new app:

Facebook is aiming to become a newspaper for mobile devices, WSJ reports. “The social network has been quietly working on a service, internally called Reader, that displays content from Facebook users and publishers in a new visual format tailored for mobile devices, people with knowledge of the matter said.”

But owning news consumption will be a challenge for Facebook, analysts say. Both Twitter and LinkedIn have been pushing their own services aggressively, while Flipboard has more than 50 million users. “There are a lot of things people didn’t do on Facebook several years ago that they now do,” said Nate Elliot, a Forrester analyst. “But I imagine it’s going to be very hard” to retrain consumers to see Facebook as a go-to hub for news. Mr. Zuckerberg is watching the Reader project closely, one of the people with knowledge of the matter said, and he has provided input and reviewed aspects of the design at various turns. While Mr. Zuckerberg has made “move fast and break things” a Facebook company mantra, the development of Reader has been relatively slow and deliberate. The team has focused on creating a product experience that works on both tablets and smartphones, the person added, and it has explored different ways to highlight news content to users, including showing public posts that are trending on the site.

June 19 2013

13:38
Very cool visualization of global tourism using Twitter...


Very cool visualization of global tourism using Twitter data:

With the power of MapBox and Twitter data from Gnip, data artist Eric Fischer worked with the Gnip team to create a fully-browsable worldwide map of local allegiances.

Blue points on the map are Tweets posted by “Locals”: people who have tweeted in a city dated over a range of a month or more. Red points are Tweets posted by “Tourists”: people who seem to be Locals in a different city and who tweeted in this city for less than a month.

June 10 2013

20:11

May 09 2013

16:28

GI Joe and the invention of the viral video

The Verge:

At least as far as internet culture is concerned, [2003] was also the year of the “GI Joe PSAs”: 25 weird, short videos made from re-edited versions of ‘80s GI Joe cartoons. Before YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter were alive to launch a meme in a minute, the GI Joe PSAs went “viral” in a time when that idea didn’t even exist.

02:28

NPR launches new smartphone site with infinite scrolling, comments & more

Highlights of the new page include:

imageInfinite headlines: The new mobile homepage features the moment’s top news, arts and music stories, followed by an unlimited list of links to all of NPR’s recent best.

Smartphone-friendly stories: For the first time, each mobile homepage headline links to the full version of that story, including all photos, audio and video. You won’t find any more abridged articles. In the past year, we’ve redesigned our stories to work well on phones and other devices.

Easy access to audio: At the top of the new mobile homepage, you’ll find quick ways to listen to NPR. Play the “24-hour program stream” to hear a continuous lineup of our recently aired shows. Or tap “hear news & programs” to play hourly news updates or browse all of our shows.

More at your fingertips: Visitors entering our site through the mobile homepage will now have access to story comments, advanced searching and extended NPR listening opportunities, such as NPR Music’s First Listen series.

April 02 2013

12:12

March 31 2013

17:49

10 examples of bespoke article design and scrolling goodness

Have you been noticing all the pretty sliding/scrolling articles that are popping up around the Internetz? My students think they’re wonderful, and so do I. So let’s look at a roundup of some great ones.

Screenshot: Snow Fall

Of course we’ll begin with Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek. This New York Times multimedia feature had the world journalism community talking and tweeting like crazy as soon as it appeared online. This blog post – More than 3.5 million page views for New York Times’ “Snow Fall” feature – reproduces an internal New York Times memo about how popular the multimedia feature turned out to be. In this post at Source (a project concerning journalism code) – How We Made Snow Fall: A Q&A with the New York Times team – the graphics director, graphics editor, video journalist, and deputy director for digital design who created this feature explain how they did it.

Screenshot: America: Elect!

America: Elect! (from The Guardian) is not only a fun, slidy mini-graphic novel – it’s also the subject of a short but very helpful how-to article: How we built our “America: Elect!” graphic novel interactive, by interactive developer Julian Burgess. Parallax scrolling libraryskrollr (check this one out).

Screenshot: Dock Ellis 1 of 2

Screenshot: Dock Ellis 2 of 2

ESPN was ahead of the pack with The Long, Strange Trip of Dock Ellis, a lavishly illustrated story about the Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher. Plugincurtain.js.

Screenshot from Pitchfork 1

Screenshot from Pitchfork 2

Pitchfork magazine used the technique as a showcase for photography, featuring Bat for Lashes singer Natasha Khan, in a cover story titled Glitter in the Dark.

Screenshot: Lost and Found

Lost and Found, an NPR story about photographer Charles W. Cushman, has a beautiful horizontal scrolling audio story in the middle of the page. Look for the Play button below the heading “The Year Is 1938.” Frameworkpopcorn.js.

Screenshot: Fracking

Screenshot: Every Last Drop

The Guardian‘s Burgess linked to a scrolling graphic story about fracking — What goes in and out of hydraulic fracturing (it appears that designer Linda Dong rolled her own scrolling code for this one) — which reminded me a little of Every Last Drop, which uses scrolling graphics to tell the story of how much water we waste every day (parallax scrolling libraryskrollr). I found the fracking story to be more journalistic, especially given the sources listed at the end.

Screenshot: Cycling's Road Forward

Another long-form narrative dressed up very nicely with this technique: Cycling’s Road Forward, from The Washington Post. Framework: Bootstrap. Tools include Modernizr.

Screenshot: Unfit for Work

Unfit for Work (from Planet Money, a program that runs on NPR) has a beautiful responsive article design. I love the big data graphics embedded throughout the article. I’ve been all over the code looking for the bit that slides the sections up and down, but all I can find is very clean CSS and HTML, great attention to responsiveness, and assorted JavaScript files that don’t reference the section element, the H3, or the wallpaper class. I’m super-impressed by the code, because it looks like it can be replicated for other articles. In other words, this design is repeatable.

Screenshot: Too Young to Wed

Too Young to Wed (from the United Nations Population Fund) is a little harder to navigate than the others, in my opinion (it interrupts the vertical scroll with horizontal-scrolling slideshows), but the gorgeous photography and heartbreaking story make it well worth a look. jQuery plugin: ScrollTo.

There are many tutorials for parallax scrolling — here’s one.

Related: The future of the feature: Breaking out of templates to build customized reading experiences, by Kevin Nguyen, November 2012

Do you have other examples to recommend? Please share links in the comments!

17:49

10 examples of bespoke article design and scrolling goodness

Have you been noticing all the pretty sliding/scrolling articles that are popping up around the Internetz? My students think they’re wonderful, and so do I. So let’s look at a roundup of some great ones.

Screenshot: Snow Fall

Of course we’ll begin with Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek. This New York Times multimedia feature had the world journalism community talking and tweeting like crazy as soon as it appeared online. This blog post – More than 3.5 million page views for New York Times’ “Snow Fall” feature – reproduces an internal New York Times memo about how popular the multimedia feature turned out to be. In this post at Source (a project concerning journalism code) – How We Made Snow Fall: A Q&A with the New York Times team – the graphics director, graphics editor, video journalist, and deputy director for digital design who created this feature explain how they did it.

Screenshot: America: Elect!

America: Elect! (from The Guardian) is not only a fun, slidy mini-graphic novel – it’s also the subject of a short but very helpful how-to article: How we built our “America: Elect!” graphic novel interactive, by interactive developer Julian Burgess. Parallax scrolling libraryskrollr (check this one out).

Screenshot: Dock Ellis 1 of 2

Screenshot: Dock Ellis 2 of 2

ESPN was ahead of the pack with The Long, Strange Trip of Dock Ellis, a lavishly illustrated story about the Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher. Plugincurtain.js.

Screenshot from Pitchfork 1

Screenshot from Pitchfork 2

Pitchfork magazine used the technique as a showcase for photography, featuring Bat for Lashes singer Natasha Khan, in a cover story titled Glitter in the Dark.

Screenshot: Lost and Found

Lost and Found, an NPR story about photographer Charles W. Cushman, has a beautiful horizontal scrolling audio story in the middle of the page. Look for the Play button below the heading “The Year Is 1938.” Frameworkpopcorn.js.

Screenshot: Fracking

Screenshot: Every Last Drop

The Guardian‘s Burgess linked to a scrolling graphic story about fracking — What goes in and out of hydraulic fracturing (it appears that designer Linda Dong rolled her own scrolling code for this one) — which reminded me a little of Every Last Drop, which uses scrolling graphics to tell the story of how much water we waste every day (parallax scrolling libraryskrollr). I found the fracking story to be more journalistic, especially given the sources listed at the end.

Screenshot: Cycling's Road Forward

Another long-form narrative dressed up very nicely with this technique: Cycling’s Road Forward, from The Washington Post. Framework: Bootstrap. Tools include Modernizr.

Screenshot: Unfit for Work

Unfit for Work (from Planet Money, a program that runs on NPR) has a beautiful responsive article design. I love the big data graphics embedded throughout the article. I’ve been all over the code looking for the bit that slides the sections up and down, but all I can find is very clean CSS and HTML, great attention to responsiveness, and assorted JavaScript files that don’t reference the section element, the H3, or the wallpaper class. I’m super-impressed by the code, because it looks like it can be replicated for other articles. In other words, this design is repeatable.

Screenshot: Too Young to Wed

Too Young to Wed (from the United Nations Population Fund) is a little harder to navigate than the others, in my opinion (it interrupts the vertical scroll with horizontal-scrolling slideshows), but the gorgeous photography and heartbreaking story make it well worth a look. jQuery plugin: ScrollTo.

There are many tutorials for parallax scrolling — here’s one.

Related: The future of the feature: Breaking out of templates to build customized reading experiences, by Kevin Nguyen, November 2012

Do you have other examples to recommend? Please share links in the comments!

August 16 2012

14:00

Prehype Uses Collaboration to Bring Startup Culture to Big Companies

What if you could incubate the energy and talent that fuels so many startups, inside a big company?

Prehype, a product innovation company with offices in New York City, London, Copenhagen, and Rio, is doing just that, providing an infrastructure of collaboration in which big company executives and their team members willingly play on equal ground. The result? Companies retain more talent, and entrepreneurial employees get the chance to remake their day jobs into their dream jobs.

Capturing the Startup Spirit

Henrik Werdelin

In the not-so-distant past, every business school graduate's dream was to get an offer from a Fortune 500 company, thanks to the promise of a good salary, competitive benefits, and a strong foothold on the corporate ladder. But these days, new MBAs are increasingly forming their own ventures instead. And often, the startups they create are the result of collaboration.

At the Wharton School, 5 percent of graduating MBAs started their own business rather than looking for jobs; that means more Wharton MBAs are becoming entrepreneurs than hedge fund managers. At Stanford, a whopping 12 percent of 2012 MBAs started their own businesses rather than going to work for someone else.

Big companies are scared by this trend -- and they should be. The talented employee who tenders her resignation in order to start her own company often inspires others to follow suit. This exodus lowers morale at a big company and causes a drain on the talent pipeline that such companies have long taken for granted.

Enter Prehype, which brings the creativity and exhilaration of a startup venture into big company structures. Prehype founder Henrik Werdelin, a Danish digital dynamo, has designed his career around turning conventional business wisdom on its head. Watch a video of Henrik talking about innovation:

Rebuild big business - how to innovate from within?, Henrik Werdelin, Prehype from Rebuild21 on Vimeo.

He and partners Philip Petersen and Steven Dean all have deep product experience working for and with big companies and startups alike, so they speak both cultures' languages. And they believe the two cultures have much to learn from one another -- and a lot to gain by collaborating.

Cultivating Internal Stars

Traditionally, when a big company wants to expand into a new line of business or target a new customer segment, it scrambles to hire outside talent. Prehype helps break this paradigm, focusing instead on finding entrepreneurial talent inside a company's ranks.

Prehype then helps these internal entrepreneurs -- or "Entrepreneurs in Residence" -- develop their new product ideas and pitch them to company executives. When execs give the green light, they give the employees the freedom, investment (of time and money), and opportunity to bring the idea to life.

Since a product's fate ultimately lies with customers' willingness to buy it, Prehype helps companies get customer feedback as early as possible in the life of the product -- namely, within 100 days.

Leveraging a company's existing human resources to develop innovative products comes with a host of advantages:

  1. Employees want to be happy, appreciated, intellectually challenged, and engaged. Prehype believes the best way to achieve this is to help employees execute their own ideas in an effort to support the company where they work.
  2. Companies develop a stronger spirit of collaboration, and employees feel a renewed sense of pride in their work and loyalty to the company.
  3. The 100-day launch timeline instigates a high level of camaraderie. It leaves no time for office politics, power plays, and the dreaded corporate silo mentality. To get a product off paper and into the hands of customers in 100 days, everyone involved needs to roll up their sleeves and work together.
  4. Though working for a startup sounds like nirvana to many a corporate employee, the truth is that it is a lot of work and success takes time to build. For people who have hefty financial obligations (such as mounting student loan debt, a mortgage, or a spouse or children who depend upon a stable income and benefits), leaving a corporate job for a startup can be difficult to near impossible. Prehype's method gives employees a way to keep the stability of their corporate jobs while increasing the satisfaction they get from their work.
  5. It's far cheaper for companies to fail and learn with their existing teams than it is to do an external talent search that may bring forward a candidate who doesn't understand, like, or fit into the company culture.

Making Big Companies Better

Prehype focuses on bringing together companies, entrepreneurs, and freelancers with world-class technical chops to help large companies capitalize on opportunities and minimize threats.

Of course, that doesn't always work. The bigger the company, the more complex its politics. And when a big company has been successful for a long time, it can be difficult to get its management to realize that what made them successful in the past will not necessarily make them successful in the future. Plus, in the current economic downturn, even the boldest corporate employees can be reticent about suggesting new ways of doing things, for fear of losing their jobs.

Given these challenges, why not just help entrepreneurial-minded people get out of Dodge, ditch their companies, and start their own business independently? The Prehype team certainly has the skills and connections to make that happen. Steven Dean offered one answer.

"Companies have interesting problems to solve," he said. "They have an enormous impact on society because they are deeply entrenched in our everyday living, and they have been for a long time. If we can help them succeed, then we all win."

Though they are open to working with a wide variety of companies in a whole host of industries, the Prehype team has found that certain company characteristics are more likely to predict success with the Prehype model than others. Midsize companies, with a demonstrated ability to change with the times, are much more open to the Prehype methodology. It also helps if a company's back is up against the wall and it has no choice but to change or fall off the map. Desperate times call for unprecedented measures, which can be just what's needed to allow a company to embrace the change it needs.


Prehype is currently on the hunt for new markets and partners who want to reinvent the way business innovates. Given the number of frustrated corporate employees and big companies that desperately need creative solutions to stay alive, I'd say Prehype has a lot of potential ahead of it, indeed.

Christa Avampato is a product developer, freelance writer, and yoga and meditation teacher based in New York City. She blogs daily about the art of creative living at Christa In New York: Curating a Creative Life. Learn more about the things that light her up by visiting her company website Chasing Down the Muse and very-often-updated Twitter feed.

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May 03 2012

17:09

Working toward a more "open" news organization at @TheTyee

Come in we're open

I haven’t done much “thinking out loud” about my ongoing work for the award-winning daily online news site, The Tyee. The collaboration started in 2007 when I was asked to retool and automate The Tyee’s e-newsletter systems. From there, we started working together on special projects and campaigns, and — after their design refresh in 2009 — I took over as the resident Web Maker on May 1st, 2010.

Over the last two years, I’ve worked most closely with The Tyee’s Front Page & Technical Editor, Geoff D’Auria. We work together so closely, in fact, that I often stay at Geoff’s when I’m in Vancouver for work sprints with The Tyee (you know a working relationship is a good one when you can pull that off!).

We’ve often discussed the opportunity to be more “open” and transparent with The Tyee’s community — specifically, we’ve discussed being more proactive in talking about technical changes we implement and about technical priorities in the coming months. For example, there have been several re-launches of The Tyee’s commenting system over the years — it started as a kludge to tie together story pages with Web forum software back in 2003 or 2004 — and eventually became what it is today, where the comments are powered by Drupal, while the site itself is managed with Bricolage. There’s a good chance it will change again later this year — part of our push to simplify the technical infrastructure as much as possible — and it would be an interesting experiment to communicate that to users in advance, and to invite feedback on the options that we’re investigating.

There are many other projects that would have been interesting to announce ahead of their implementation, like the HTML5 Web app, the “Small-M” mobile site, and the new Video section. And, as new non-technical projects roll out at The Tyee this year, like the Master Class series, the Builder Campaign, and a soon-to-be-launched iBook experiment, my sense is that there are lots of opportunities to leverage the wisdom of The Tyee’s crowd, who are in my experience smart, often tech-savvy, and very tuned-in to local and regional issues.

But, practically, what does this type of user engagement look like?

Geoff and I have discussed everything from a “Tyee Labs” blog, similar to what several news organizations with “news apps” teams have done, to something more straightforward like The Verge’s Version History page. For me, neither are quite right for The Tyee. Even though the team at The Tyee likes to think of the whole enterprise as an experiment (which is an awesome context to be able to work within), the honest truth is that technical resources are stretched pretty thin and we don’t have a lot of extra cycles for true “experiments,” so my sense is that a “Labs blog” might be underwhelming. On the flip side, while I like the simplicity of the Version History idea, it does nothing to provide a forward-looking view into what we’re working on, i.e., what’s on deck for next week, next month, or next year.

The more I think about it, the more a picture comes to mind that is half what the Guardian UK is trying by publishing their “news lists” and with their Inside The Guardian blog, and half an idea that Amanda Hickman waxed poetic about at last year’s NICAR conference that involved using a “bug tracker” or issue-tracking system for news, and making that system visible to the users. In summary, something that would capture both what we are working on, what we’re discussing, what we’ve completed recently, and what “bugs” or issues that the community has brought to our attention.

Ultimately, I wrestle with the two tensions around a project like this:

  • First, I have a gut sense that a lot of the Tyee’s community would really appreciate a “view inside” their favourite news organization, a peek “inside the tent” if you will. But what I’m talking about here is almost exclusively technical, and not about the editorial calendar or the personalities inside The Tyee, which is probably the most outwardly interesting stuff. So, would this view across technical projects be enough to create some deeper engagement with Tyee users?

  • Second, there’s the obvious question of the work involved in “opening-up The Tyee,” whether that’s technical systems or, more likely to be a big push, the effort to change the way we do things so that there’s more “thinking out loud.” Then, after that work, there’s the added overhead of listening to users and bringing their voices into regular planning meetings, and so on. Just like having comments on stories, once you give users the opportunity to speak you have to be prepared to make time to listen.

With any new project I always try to consider the opportunity cost, i.e., What will we not be able to do because we’re embarking on this undertaking, and I try to weight that against the possible upside, i.e., what’s the best and worst possible outcome of the project in question and does it justify the investment of time and resources?

It’s a tough question.

Having inspiring examples of other news organizations that have lead the way on projects like this is always helpful fodder for these discussions. So, if you have some examples, please drop them in the comments, or shoot me a note on The Twitters.

April 23 2012

15:36

Slides from ISOJ talk on Andy Carvin sourcing of the Arab Spring

Here is the presentation I gave at the International Symposium on Online Journalism at UT Austin of our paper, Sourcing the Arab Spring: A case study of Andy Carvin’s sources during the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions.

The abstract is available on the papers site of the International Symposium on Online Journalism.

15:32

New feature makes News.me your virtual ‘Paper Boy’

News.me, a wonderful iPhone app that curates all the news that your friends are sharing, launched a great new feature today called “Paper Boy,” that automatically downloads the latest news to the iPhone app whenever you leave home. All you have to do is set your home location so that...

April 21 2012

19:31

WSJ Raju Narisetti on the need to create great news experiences

The last keynote at ISOJ was Raju Narisetti, managing editor, Wall Street Journal Digital Network

Narisetti said the big challenge faces journalism is turning great content into great experiences

He noted that great content is now available in a wide variety of places. So just having smart content is not enough. Instead, he said, we have to create experiences to engage the user.

We are terrible at turning the multimedia parts of stories into a great experience, said Narisetti. There are words, images, perhaps video. But collectively, they do not make for a great experience

For him, a great experience comes at the intersection of technology and content.

Narisetti said that great experiences will not just come from developers or programmers. Instead we should think about embedding the developers in the newsroom.

“The physical architecture of the newsroom matters a lot,” he said. Titles matter now, he added, as a title will affect how journalists in the newsroom perceive and react to a developer.

In his view, a title like frontend developer or backend developer makes it hard for journalists to relate to the work of developers.

Moreover, Narisetti said the credits matter. He recalled how at the Washington Post, a major project credited the journalists but not the developers.

Looking ahead, Narisetti said we need to consider how projects will live on in the future. Is there a shelf-life? Do we post a note to readers, telling them this database is no longer updated?

We have to maintain the experience, he said, or think of the shelf-life of an experience.

In other words, newsrooms must plan for impermanence.

Talking about journalism education, Narisetti asked how students were being taught about engagement, about metrics, about enhancing loyalty to the brand.

One of the things they are doing the WSJ is thinking about the news as a stream of content. He showed an example of the WSJ live coverage of the Oscars.

The WSJ is doing the same thing with market coverage, to have a stream of news and information.

For Narisetti, it is about finding ways of having readers come back to your journalism and your brand.

 

15:09

Making data visualisation useful for audiences

At ISOJ, Alberto Cairo, lecturer in visual journalism, University of Miami, raised some critical questions about the visualisation of data in journalism.

Cairo explained that an information graphic is a tool for presenting information and for exploring information.

In the past, info graphics were about editing data down and summarising it. But this worries me, he says, as it is just presenting information but does not allow readers to explore the data.

Today we have the opposite trend and often ends up as data art which doesn’t help readers understand the data.

Cairo cited a New York Times project mapping neighbourhoods which he said forced readers to become their own reporters and editors to understand the data.

We have to create layers, he said. We have the presentation layer and we have the exploration layer, and these are complementary.

But readers need help to navigate the data, he said. Part of the task is giving clues to readers to understand the complexity of data.

Cairo quoted a visualistion mantra by Ben Shneiderman: “Overview first, zoom and filter, then details-on-demand.”

His approached echoed earlier comments by Brian Boyer, news applications editor, Chicago Tribune Media Group. Boyer said that we should make data beautiful, inspirational but make it useful to the audience.

 

14:29

April 20 2012

21:47

The challenges for journalism start-ups in Europe

Online journalism start-ups in Europe are struggling, according to a report from the Reuters Institute for the study of Journalism.

Rasmus Kleis Nielsen presented the results of the study, Survival is Sucess, co-authored by Nicola Bruno, at ISOJ.

They found that journalism start-ups are facing a challenging time.

First, news is still dominated by legacy businesses, with national differences. In Germany, there is a strong but declining legacy news media, whereas in France and Italy, there is a weak and rapidly declining legacy media.

Secondly, the market for online advertising is tough, with low Cost Per Thousand Impressions (CPM) rates. And it is dominated by a few very large US-based players which capture much of the search and display advertising in Europe.

The journalism start-ups found it hard to survive just based on advertising. The report suggests that “though internet use and online advertising is growing rapidly across Europe, it is not clear that this alone will provide the basis for a new generation of innovative and sustainable journalistic start-ups.”

There are individual examples of success, such as Mediapart, an investigative news website operating behind a paywall in France. But the track record in Europe has been less than inspiring, said Nielsen.

The report concludes:

Based on the countries and cases examined here it seems that at this juncture the journalistic start- ups most likely to thrive are those that deliver a distinct, quality product, operate with lean organisations, have diverse revenue streams, and are oriented towards niche audiences poorly served by existing legacy media.

 

19:58

The six traits of successful entrepreneurs

Mark Briggs, author of Entrepreneurial Journalism and director of Digital Media at KING 5, Seattle, got people thinking at ISOJ by going over the six traits for entrepreneurs.

First of all, you have to be able to get some funding. You need to be able to make the ask, said Briggs, or you are not an entrepreneur.

Then you need to be able to sell, convince others about the value of your idea or proposal.

Briggs said to be successful you needed to be open.  Traditionally journalists tend not be open about their story ideas and more. But as a entrepreneur, said Briggs, you have to be able to socialise your idea, get feedback and collaborate.

The fourth trait was failure. Briggs said failure was inevitable and failure leads to success.

Five, you need partners – people to work with who can bring your idea to fruition.

And finally, Briggs said you have to be able to innovate.  You have to embrace and understand innovation.

And with that quickfire talk, Briggs wrapped up his talk at ISOJ.

 

16:49

Study into Twitter as a community reporting tool

The first academic presentation at International Symposium on Online Journalism came from Carrie Brown of the University of Memphis.

For her study, #Memstorm: Twitter as a community-driven breaking news reporting tool, she looked at real-time flow of information on Twitter during the storms that hit the region.

She highlighted how the hashtag, #Memstorm, did not come from the news outlets but from the public.

Fox tried to created its own hashtag to brand the storms, but Brown noted there was an audience backlash against Fox.

The most common type of tweets were direct observation, essentially eye-witness reports. There were also examples of people asking questions about reports and rumours to verify information.

For retweets, Brown found there was also a significant amount of material from the media, especially TV stations.

Brown found there was a sense of people commiserating with each other on Twitter, expressing emotion and sympathy.

There were also attempts at humour around the storm on Twitter.

She suggested the role for journalists in an ambient journalism environment was verification, amplification of the best stuff, engaging with audiences and providing very specific location information.

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