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May 10 2013

14:12

Videology’s Jamboretz: Asian TV Migrating Straight To Mobile

Online video innovation is now quickening outside the United States – but in very different ways, according to the international director of video ad technology group Videology.

“The general notion when we first started our international business three years ago was, markets outside the US were 18 to 24 months behind,” Ryan Jamboretz told Beet.TV’s recent London Video Ad Strategy Summit. “It’s compressing. It’s now starting to feel like six to nine months.”

But Jamboretz said that evolution is happening at different speeds in different markets. “When we go to Asia, the majority of our distribution of our video assets for our clients… TV isn’t morphing to PCs; it’s morphing to mobile.” Much European video consumption remains PC-based, he added.

 

July 27 2012

17:34

Best Online Resources for Following the 2012 London Summer #Olympics

olympics digital 2012 small.jpg

The 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London have largely been anticipated as the first social media Olympics. Athletes, fans, and the media shared their voices online during the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver, but this time in London, even the International Olympic Committee (IOC) decided to adopt a full-fledged social media strategy. Starting with the Athletes' Hub - fully integrated with Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram -- fans can keep track of all their favorite Olympians. The IOC has also created official accounts on Tumblr and Instagram. Meanwhile, NBC continues to announce partnerships with social platforms, which now include Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and Storify. All of these social media channels provide countless ways for viewers to fully immerse in the Olympic experience.

We also saw the ugly side of social media this week, as Greek athlete Voula Papachristou was promptly removed from the Games for posting a tweet that was deemed as racist. But hopefully, the vast array of social media options will carry out their intended function in the next two weeks - that is, to allow everyone involved in the London Olympic Games to share more of their stories and thoughts in more engaging ways. And to help you navigate the Games' endless flow of exciting content, the following list compiles the best resources across the Web.

SPECIAL SITES AND PAGES

BBC's London 2012 page

ESPN's Olympics page

Huffington Post's Olympics page

IOC's Olympics site

IOC's Olympic Athletes' Hub

NBCOlympics.com

NY Times' Olympics page

Official London 2012 site

SB NATION's Olympics page

Sports Illustrated's Olympics page

The Guardian's Olympics page

Yahoo! Sports' Olympics page

TWITTER LISTS

AP Olympics Staff list

Automated Results from the Games

International Paralympians

NBCOlympics' Summer Olympics List

NY Times' 2012 Olympians list

NY Times Olympic journalists list

Twitter Verified Olympians

2012 US Olympic Athletes

2012 Great Britain Olympic Athletes

TWITTER FEEDS

BBC News' coverage

Canadian Olympic Team

Great Britain Olympic Team

NBC Olympics

NY Times' coverage

London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics

Swiss Olympic Team

The Telegraph's coverage

UK's Press Association

US Olympic Team

FACEBOOK PAGES

IOC's Olympics page

Official London 2012 page

NBC Olympics

NBC Olympics app

OTHER SOCIAL MEDIA COMMUNITIES

Instagram: @Olympics

@facesofolympians

Google+: IOC's Olympics page

Pinterest: NBC Olympics

TODAY Olympics

2012 Olympic Games

Quora: 2012 Summer Olympic Games

Storify: 2012 Summer Olympic Games by NBCNews

Olympics topic index

Tumblr: IOC's Olympic Moments Tumblr

London 2012's Explore the Ceremonies Tumblr

Youtube: London 2012

NBC Olympics

PHOTOS

The London Olympics 2012. Get yours at bighugelabs.com

Flickr's 2012 London Olympic Games pool (in a slide-show below)

Guardian's live blog

Huffington Post

IOC's photo page

NBCOlympics

Yahoo! Sports

VIDEO

IOC's video page

London 2012's video page

NBCOlympics videos

jordyn weiber routines.jpg

NBCOlympics streaming video

Yahoo! Sports video

MOBILE

London 2012 mobile apps

NBCOlympics mobile apps

BLOGS AND ARTICLES

10 Bold Predictions for the 2012 Summer Olympics

30 must-follow Olympians on Twitter

London itself is something of an Olympic Village

London Olympics: This time, Summer Games are about the athletes

Marketers to spend big in social media during Olympics

Missteps at the 2012 Olympics

Twitter Crashes Day Before Olympics

Twitter Embraces Olympics to Train for the Big Time

US Olympic Committee wants Olympics footage out of campaign ads

If you know an Olympics resource that should be on this list but isn't, please share in the comments, and we'll add them!

Jenny Xie is the PBS MediaShift editorial intern. Jenny is a rising senior at Massachusetts Institute of Technology studying architecture and management. She is a digital-media junkie fascinated by the intersection of media, design, and technology. Jenny can be found blogging for MIT Admissions, tweeting @canonind, and sharing her latest work and interests here.

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November 07 2010

13:05

Advice for journalism educators in Africa

While I was attending the annual Online News Association conference a week ago, one of several great panels I sat in on was titled “From Earthquakes to Coups: Tools for Crisis Reporting.” I’ve been interested in crisis mapping and other crowdsourced efforts during disasters ever since I learned how valuable these were after the earthquake in Haiti earlier this year.

After the panel I managed to grab two of the panelists in the hallway for quick interviews. First up, Rob Baker of Ushahidi:

Next, Mark Frohardt of Internews:

I missed my chance to talk with Robert Soden, a senior GIS developer at Development Seed, who gave an inspiring presentation about OpenStreetMap.

It’s interesting to think of the ways that crowdsourced information linked to maps could be used in conjunction with reporting stories. Any community problem such as bad roads could be documented via text messages from members of the public.

October 11 2010

08:22

wikiSCHAP on Net Squared --> Exclusive Footage --> CAST YOUR VOTE for wikiSCHAP on Monday Oct 11 @ 12:00 pm

Greetings Net Squared Community,

SCHAP is introducing our first exclusive preview into a revolutionary concept of wikiSCHAP.  Below is a sneak peak behind the scenes preview into what is coming next.  SCHAP is taking International Program Development to a whole new level and is looking for citizens who are interested and excited about becoming a Global Citizen.  Global Citizens have a interest in what is happening around the world and would like to become part of an international team.

The official SCHAP website: http://www.schap.info/SCHAP/Home/Home.html

read more

March 26 2010

21:29

Join Global Pulse 2010! Talk with Youssou N'Dour, senior officials from the White House, ambassadors and others

Next week, the US Government will launch Global Pulse 2010, an unprecedented, online brainstorming event focused on global sustainability and development. This forum will give participants a chance to engage with thousands of people from around the world on 10 major challenges facing the global community.

read more

February 20 2010

08:35

Why is International Market Research so Important?


Market research gives businesses essential information on customers, competitors, and market. Most businesses claim to understand the value of this research because they are using this information to sell their product to their clients.

Market research is just as important for international business. And even more so…

Your success in foreign markets will depend on your international market research. It is especially important during your business planning phase.

Reasons For International Business Planning

There are two main reasons to be very thorough when researching your international markets. During this planning phase you need to learn:

what you can hope to accomplish
what to not to do and avoid cross cultural blunders

The Difference In International Market Research

The difference between domestic and international market research is the importance of the smallest details and the differences in the smallest details can influence your success.

Different cultures respond differently to your product, your marketing, your business. This implies more than simple interest in your product. Some markets may actually use your product differently than you expect. You need to know exactly how each of your markets respond to your product, your company, your marketing.

Cross cultural communication differences will influence everything you can think of and more. If you are not intimately familiar with the cultures you are targeting plan for surprises.

Schedule More Time For International Business Planning

This is why it is essential to have a strong international market research strategy. Here is what to do:

Schedule more time researching prior to any launch.
Continue with your international market research.
Diversify your research channels.
Use web marketing to stimulate international market feedback.
Question everything possible.
… And be methodical.

Market Research For Online Businesses

International web marketing allows you to jump into sales faster than ever before. In fact, if you have an online business you might even get non-domestic sales without doing anything in particular to sell your products abroad. But don’t make the mistake of not implementing good international business practices.

You can easily set up a new market research strategy in parallel with your current business.

Once you start getting sales inquiries internationally, start researching those new markets. This will allow you to see your potential international business opportunities.

Remember, you can’t rely on analyzing your online international sales alone. Only by researching your market can give you the whole picture.

Continuous Market Research

It’s important to actively carry out your market research continuously throughout all of your online sales and marketing efforts. This is key to developing your business internationally.

Internet can be an easy solution and an essential part of your expansion plan… only if you do sufficient international market research. Don’t simply put your order page up and sit back.

Create your website to help you in your information.
Set up a good tracking tool to measure your results.
Direct your international market research based on your measurements.
Start an international market research plan.
Add a little web marketing to get more market feedback.
Continue researching all of your markets.

You will learn how to develop your markets internationally, and what to not do. That is why market research is so important and is one of the foundations for successful international business.

Are you committed to speeding up your international sales cycles?

Learn how to combine cross-cultural marketing tools and international sales strategies for faster sales.

Join us on the International Sales Road Map.

Would you like to develop your international business?
Are you a beginner at international sales and marketing?
Read the Beginners Guide Discover Your International Business.

Cindy King
Cross-Cultural Marketer & International Sales Specialist


Over 25 years field experience in aligning cultural offers for international sales.


International content strategy

Custom publishing in English to build international markets B2B international lead generation


40km south of Paris, France – GMT+1

Cell: +33 6 98 91 86 11
Follow me on Twitter
Get International Clients

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November 13 2009

15:54

Advice for German media

I have an op-ed in today’s Welt Kompakt newspaper in Germany giving my advice to a German mediasphere that I see becoming more protectionist. It’s not online (ironically) but so you can see the play, a PDF of it is here and here. This is my original English text:

* * *

At the Müncher Medientage, I spoke to 500 German executives from my home in New York and dared to give them some advice about their fate. I urged them to learn these lessons from watching American news companies shrivel and die: Protectionism is no strategy for the future. Every company in every industry (especially media) must be reinvented for the post-Guttenberg age—for the Google era. And the only sane response to change is to embrace it and find the opportunity in it.

I have been impressed with the innovation and openness to change I have seen in German media: Axel Springer shifted a large proportion of its revenue to digital; Bild equipped Germans with video cameras to report news; Burda invested in the networks Glam.com and Science Blogs; Holtzbrinck innovated in its incubator; WAZ created a world pioneer in DerWesten.

But when the times got tough in the financial crisis, I suddenly saw German media looking for an enemy to blame for their problems. The head of the Deutscher Journalisten-Verband called for legislation to condemn Google as a monopoly, an enemy of the press. Dr. Hubert Burda, a digital visionary I greatly admire, urged that copyright law should be expanded to protect publishers, whom he said deserve a share of search engines’ revenue. Chancellor Merkel is considering such changes in copyright. A group of publishers issued the Hamburg Declaration saying that all online content need not be free (though that has always been completely in their control).

Schade. In these pronouncements, I hear echoes of American media’s funeral hymns. I see companies resisting the new reality of the internet age by trying to preserve the old rules of their old industry. Take, for example, Rupert Murdoch vowing to put all his news properties behind pay walls just because that’s how media used to operate—when that will only reduce audience, traffic, influence, and advertising just at the moment when growth is needed most. He is even threatened to block Google. That is simply suicidal.

Though I sympathize with media’s economic nostalgia, I must say that swimming upstream against the internet is futile. The better idea is to go with the flow of the internet, to see and exploit its opportunities.

Rather than fighting Google, learn lessons from it. Google understands the new economics of media. That is why it is successful—not because it exploits old media companies. Those old companies still operate in the content economy, begun 570 years by Guttenberg, in which the owner of content profited by selling multiple copies. Online, there needs to be only one copy of content and it is the links to it that bring it value. Content without links has no value. So when search engines, aggregators, bloggers, and Twitterers link to content, they are not stealing; they are giving the gift of attention and audience. Indeed, publishers should be grateful that Google does not charge them for the value of its links.

This link economy brings three imperatives for publishers. First, it requires them to make their content public if they want to be found. That is their choice, but if they retreat behind pay walls, hidden from search and links, they will not be discovered and they only create opportunities for new, free competitors. Second, the link economy demands specialization: Do what you do best and link to the rest. This specialization also brings a new efficiency that can make publishers more profitable. Third, in the link economy, it is the recipient of links who must exploit their value. That is still the publisher’s job.

Google has earned an estimated 30 percent of online ad revenue because it serves advertisers differently—and better. Here, too, Google understands a new economy, one based on abundance rather than scarcity. Publishers, even online, still sell scarcity as if the internet were print: only so many ad positions for so many eyeballs—what the market will bear. Google instead charges for clicks; it sells performance. Thus Google takes a share of the risk and that is what motivates it to place advertising all over the internet, to create more relevant positions for ads that will perform better for both the marketer and Google. That is why advertising has shifted to Google—not because it is enemy of the media but because advertisers prefer it. We call that competition.

The most important lesson to learn from Google is that it grew huge not by trying to acquire and control content on the internet, as publishers do. Google doesn’t want to own the internet, only to organize it. So Google created a platform that enables others to succeed with technology, content, promotion, and advertising revenue. That is Glam’s model, too, creating networks of hundreds of independent sites and then helping them succeed. I believe that platforms and networks will form the basis of the future of media—and much of the next economy.

At the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism, where I teach, I am running the New Business Models for News Project [funded by the Knight Foundation], envisioning a profitable future for news if regional newspapers covering cities die. Though national news brands—whether this publication or the Guardian or The New York Times—have a future, regional newspapers across America and Europe are in trouble and some will die. Yet I am confident that journalism in those cities will not die, because there is a market demand for news, which we believe the market can meet.

We believe that news will emerge from ecosystems made up of many players—journalists, citizen journalists, citizen salespeople, volunteers, technologists—operating under different motives and means. Today, in America, we see hyperlocal bloggers earning $100-200,000 a year in advertising; these are real businesses. We see an opportunity to help them make more money by creating local, regional, and national advertising networks. We see the opportunity for a new newsroom to continue beat and investigative reporting and to work collaboratively with these networks. Without the cost of print and distribution, these new news organizations become smaller but profitable.

If you are trying to protect old jobs in old structures of old companies in old industries, then you might see my vision of the future as a threat. But if you embrace change and innovation, then you will see opportunities to reimagine and remake journalism, to find new ways to gather and share news collaboratively, supported by new revenue, reaching profitability thanks to new efficiencies.

Publishers will not get to that bright future by urging government to protect them from innovators and competitors. No, if we want anything from government, it should be universal broadband to encourage society’s migration to a digital economy, and a lack of regulation to assure a level playing field for innovation.

I hope that once the desperation of the current economic crisis subsides, my German media friends will not try to retreat to their old models but will instead continue to invent new ways and to again become leaders in innovation. That is the only sensible path to survival and success.

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