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May 28 2013

17:06

Sports Illustrated is the latest to go for live video webshows

Josh Sternberg at Digiday has the info:

The Time Inc. sports outlet is rolling out a 30-minute daily live talk show called “SI Now powered by Ford” with the hopes of bringing back some of SI’s swagger. Anchored by SI’s Maggie Gray, the show will broadcast live at 1p.m. EDT, Monday through Friday. It will include commentary and analysis from a roster of SI contributors but also tap into the social world where visitors can log into the site to comment, ask questions, answer polls. After the show airs, it will get a second life on the site where visitors can view on demand.

May 14 2013

19:42

Brightcove Announces Live Streaming Platform

BOSTON – Brightcove, the big video services company, announced today a full-blown, live streaming platform.  The company allows the live file to be uploaded to the cloud and and then encoded into as many as 20 live renditions, says founder and executive chairman Jeremy Allaire in this interview with Beet.TV

We spoke with him at BrightcovePLAY, the company’s annual customer conference taking place in Boston.  He says the new service will be available to Brightcove customers but will also be available as a one-off engagement to others.

Disclosure:  Our coverage of the Brightcove event is sponsored by the company.

November 03 2010

18:00

Election night video streams: How TV-like is too TV-like?

If the 2008 election coverage was a coming-out party for social media, then last night was to some extent a party for live-streamed video. On news sites large and small, national and local, the red-and-blue infographics you’d expect to see stretched across homepages were often broken up by boxes of straight-from-the-newsroom, live presentations by reporters. Two biggies in that group came from two biggies in online news: The New York Times, building off of its TimesCasts experience, offered an occasional, from-the-newsroom live-stream — a first for the paper — while the Wall Street Journal, building off its daily NewsHub video, featured a constant, six-hour-long event.

Both “broadcasts” had a Wayne’s World-but-in-suits feel to them: fairly casual, conversation-oriented, and, most of all, markedly lo-fi in setting and aesthetics — a kind of cable-access-channel-like response to the ZOOM! POW! PLEASEPLEASEPLEASEDONTCHANGETHECHANNEL! pizzazz of cable news proper. It was a bit of a back-to-the-future move for news organizations that largely marketed last night’s coverage not in terms not of personality — “let Dan Rather guide you through election returns” — but of platform: “We have X graphic!” “Tune in for X interactive!” On cable channels, the anchors and reporters and news analysts and commentators were often framed not merely as authorities in their own right, but also as hosts for a pageant-like parade of pretty new technologies. (Check out CNN’s awesome new Hologram Wall! And, oh yeah, some reporter.)

The video feeds suggested a reverse of that: On the webcasts, technology became the conduit for the personality. The video brought bylines to life (so that’s what Jim Rutenberg looks like!); it humanized the otherwise extra-personal data and narrative that pinged around the papers’ sites last night. And while there’s something to be said for the lean-back experience of effortless immersion that is watching election results, as opposed to reading about them or hearing about them, online — for news audiences, passivity itself can be a selling point for content — it’s an open question how much room the web has for such straight-from-cable thinking when it comes to the content that lives on it. Which is to say, the content that’s created for it.

Last night’s webcasts, as informal as they felt, also had the feeling of trying to be cable news without actually, you know, being cable news: They took the mores of the visual medium — analysis, punctuated by banter, interrupted by breaking news — and adopted them. Instead of adapting them. The attempts to bring a new dimension to election coverage was certainly admirable, as most experimentation generally is. But they also begged an open question: With the web’s increasing ability to act like television…how much should it act like television? Why try to out-TV TV?

March 10 2010

16:04

Watch the UK National Digital Inclusion Conference Online Today and Tomorrow

Digital InclusionOver the next two days, key influencers from around Britain and around the world are at the National Digital Inclusion Conference organizing and planing for digital inclusion in the UK. You can take part by watching the live video stream and sharing your opinions on Twitter.

read more

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