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April 02 2013

12:06

January 06 2012

17:26

Daily Must Reads, Jan. 6, 2012

The best stories across the web on media and technology, curated by Nathan Gibbs


1. BitTorrent takes on Dropbox with personal file sharing (GigaOM)

2. Why ONA opposes #SOPA (Online News Association)

3. Europe's largest free WiFi zone set for London (BBC News)

4. Matt Alexander: The e-reader, as we know it, is doomed (The Loop)

5. How Google beat AP with Iowa caucus results (and why it matters) (Poynter)

6. News orgs form NewsRight to protect digital rights, licensing (MediaPost)




Subscribe to our daily Must Reads email newsletter and get the links in your in-box every weekday!



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This is a summary. Visit our site for the full post ».

September 14 2011

22:53

MediaShift Mixer Co-Hosted with ONA

Please join us at our MediaShift Mixer co-hosted by ONA in Boston as a kick-off to the ONA11 Conference (but you don't have to be registered for the conference to attend). Here's a partial list of the special guests at the mixer:

cuny logo.jpg

Mark Glaser, MediaShift
Dorian Benkoil, MediaShift

Jeanne Brooks, ONA

Andy Carvin, NPR

Professor Jeremy Caplan, CUNY

Professor Jere Hester, CUNY

Doug Mitchell, Project Director, UNITY

Greg Linch, Washington Post

Dan Schultz, MIT Media Lab

Miranda Mulligan, Boston Globe

Tiffany Campbell, Seattle Times

Chris Krewson, Variety.com

Details

drinksmall.jpg

September 21, 2011
Wednesday night

7 pm to 9 pm or so

Storyville (formerly the Saint)
90 Exeter St.

Boston, MA 02116

(617) 236-1134

Google Map location

The first round is on MediaShift; just find "the guy in the hat"!

This Mixer is brought to you by the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.

Please RSVP for the event with this form. We will prioritize people who RSVP'ed ahead of time in case of a large turnout.

(Note: You don't have to be registered for ONA to attend our Mixer.)

If you are interested in sponsoring future events, please contact MediaShift through this form.

This is a summary. Visit our site for the full post ».

July 10 2011

01:05

Help us lead and change the future of journalism

Uncle Sam

UPDATE, 7/10/11: The Society for News Design is also on the prowl for some new leadership! Nominations for their Secretary/Treasurer position is now open (they use a ladder system for the executive leadership, so in three years you could be the president). As you may know, I’m also heavily involved in SND and working as co-director of the SND St. Louis convention. The deadline for nominations is Sunday, July 31st and the winner of the election will actually be announced in St. Louis at the shindig, so bust a move. Check out all the details here.

Reminder: Monday, July 18th is the deadline for the Online News Association’s call for Board of Director nominations.

ONA is becoming one of the largest and most influential journalism organizations in the world, so the role the Board of Directors plays is not only steering the organization, but the potential future of journalism. So we really need the best and brightest allies at the helm. :) Please come join us or consider if any leaders you know might be interested and spread the word!

It may seem like an insurmountable goal to get elected, and believe me, I know. When I ran for election last year I didn’t think I really had a chance going up against more than 20 amazing leaders from around the country, including seven excellent incumbents, but thanks to your support, I was elected and have been rocking out and making a difference with the MJ Bear Fellowships, student and educators committee (and with that helping found ONA Mizzou) and ONA Issues. Also at board meetings, I’ve done my best to help drive the strategy, represent ‘fly-over country’ and made strong (sometimes unpopular) stances on issues I believed in, including challenging the removal of term limits for board members. (Fyi, Liz Lufkin and I were the only votes against. See page 5 of the Jan. meeting minutes if you want more info.) The board has a lot of power and a heavy hand in the organization, and with removal of term limits it’s exponentially important that we reach out to find the best, active leaders to help steer the organization.

Don’t get me wrong, ONA is doing fantastic, but as Uncle Ben in Spiderman said, “With great power comes great responsibility.” We need to keep up the great progress and continue to move forward and lead past the digital transition into the future. If you’re at all considering running, please contact me [Will -at- Journerdism.com] and feel free to ask any questions.

I’d also especially encourage those potential candidates who are based in the Midwest, South, West and international, and who believe in / work in entrepreneurial projects, community news or emerging technologies. We’re seeking out candidates who can help us represent more diversity in medium and geographic location on the board to help reflect members’ interests and growth areas in the industry.

Help us help the industry. Get involved.

 

May 24 2011

16:14

Apply now for the Online Journalism Awards

The Online Journalism Awards are now open for entries. Eight awards come with a total of $33,000 in prize money. The deadline is June 27. See last year’s winners here. To enter, read the rules and eligibility then head to the entry forms.

March 31 2011

19:01

January 05 2011

17:33

Are People of Color Missing in New Media? A #MediaDiversity Chat

How many times have you been to a technology or media conference and noticed the dominance of white male speakers at the podium or the room? That's what Arizona State University professor and media veteran Retha Hill saw when she attended the recent NewsFoo conference in Phoenix and the ONA conference in Washington, DC.

She wrote about the diversity problem at new media conferences, as well as some possible solutions, in a post on Idea Lab last week. Quickly, the response on social media and in the comments showed that it was a hot topic, and something that resonated with a lot of people in the industry.

So the next day, I organized a Twitter chat at the #mediadiversity hashtag, and invited Retha Hill, Doug Mitchell of New U (and former NPR), and Rafat Ali (founder of PaidContent) to participate. I threw out some questions and thought it was an excellent chat. Not only did we talk about the problems in the industry, but we talked about solutions and what we could do to make conferences -- and newsrooms -- more diverse.

Below is an edited version of the tweets from that conversation last week on Twitter, as culled via KeepStream. You can see a longer version of the chat here.

Plus, Robert Hernandez had a very personal take on this in OJR, and here's his conclusion:

If we don't invest in recruiting and training members of diverse groups to help us do and advanced journalism ... we are royally screwed.

My New Year's resolution is to harness my access and network to improve diversity across the board for web journalism. But I need your help. I need your ideas.

More importantly, in your newsrooms, your communities (and those you are not a part of) need your help. Reach out, connect, participate, preach and downright fight to ensure your news org's journalism reflects the diverse community it covers. Help it stay relevant.

It's hard to argue with his resolution.

Mark Glaser is executive editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He also writes the bi-weekly OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. He lives in San Francisco with his son Julian. You can follow him on Twitter @mediatwit.

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December 28 2010

14:30

Why Are New Media Conferences Lacking in Minorities?

It's been a couple of weeks since Tim O'Reilly's News Foo rolled into the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in Phoenix, and while I truly enjoyed thinking big thoughts with big thinkers about the direction of our industry, I couldn't help but notice how lacking in diversity the invitation-only gathering was. The same thing could be said for the Online News Association conference held in Washington, D.C., the end of October. True, there were a lot more brown faces at this last gathering than six or seven years ago when Ju-Don Roberts, then a senior editor at Washington Post-Newsweek Interactive, and I were the only African Americans in the room. The lack of diversity at ONA '10 was the subject of a brief but heated conversation between some National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) members, a few of whom wanted to "do something" about it, like call ONA's leadership out.

Was it an oversight? A slap? Or was it a reflection of the lack of diversity in the country's online newsrooms? Maybe it is the echo chamber effect of the online news types whose definition of who is innovating is limited to the people they hang with.

Plenty of Candidates

It surely couldn't be that there are no persons of color innovating in media. A year before, prior to the ONA conference in San Francisco, I helped put together a list of about 20 African Americans, ranging from online executives to entrepreneurs to a CTO, who could be on panels. Sadly, none of them made the cut. And each year, when I organize a week-long intensive innovation session held by the Newspaper Association of America Foundation, where three groups of five college students each have five days to come up with a new product for the newspaper industry, minorities and women are well represented on the speaker's list.

This year, more than half of the speakers were persons of color, including power hitters such as Chris Hendricks, VP of interactive media for McClatchy, who schooled the students about the reality of online advertising; Caesar Andrews of Gannett to talk about ethics and technology; Dr. Sybril Bennett of Belmont University who caught the students up on the latest technology innovations; and Brandon Harris of Gannett's innovation group, 11g, who guided them through the human-centered design approach to disruption.

It didn't take that much effort to put together the list of speakers, and I was pretty much restricted to NAA members so didn't reach out to people who are doing their own thing like Fern Shen, founder of Baltimore Brew, or Rick Hancock, who built a full multimedia studio in his basement where he runs a successful new media empire in Connecticut. And I didn't reach out to the likes of Denmark West, president of digital media for BET Networks; or Chuck Creekmur and Greg Watkins, the guys who successfully launched Allhiphop.com more than a decade ago when they were using two-way pagers to push the news out; or academics such as Kevin Clark, director of Digital Media and Innovation at George Mason University; or Michelle Ferrier, associate professor at Elon University and a J-Lab Women Entrepreneurs grant winner. These people are from a list off the top of my head, and there are many more out there.

I'm not going to put all of the blame, if you will, for the lack of diversity at these conferences on the organizers. Persons of color who are innovating or want to innovate need to get involved and raise their own profiles. The UNITY journalism groups have been way too slow in preparing members to make the transition from staff member to COO of their own ventures or training them to roll from legacy to new media. But that is changing. Thanks to the Ford Foundation, each of the minority journalism groups had funding this year to seed a startup, and a panel I was on that dealt with innovation was standing room-only at last summer's NABJ convention.

I also applaud those organizations that are consciously making sure that journalists of color are getting the training they need to be successful in new media. The Freedom Forum's New Media training at the Diversity Institute in Nashville and the Maynard Institute continues to make sure mid-level executives are steeped in new media and innovation. This summer, the Village Voice alt-weekly is launching a Minority Media Digital Fellowship, a 10-week training program for college students that will be held at the Cronkite School and facilitated by yours truly, because the publisher doesn't like the number of minorities doing the digital thing. The deadline for applying is Feb. 8.

New Year's Resolutions

I'm not one to see problems without thinking of solutions, so in light of a new year coming upon us, let's collectively make some resolutions when it comes to diversity in this new media that we are building:

• When planning conferences and panels, resolve to expand beyond your trusted go-to group of presenters to a more diverse set. If you don't know whom to invite, ask and I'll make sure I give you some names. Feel free to start with the people already mentioned.

• Go young: BET.com, MTV.com, Allhiphop.com to name a few are a wonderful source for millennials who have experience in interactive content and news. I am happy to see ONA launching a youth initiative as a tribute to one of its founding members, MJ Bear, who passed away in December. It was one of her last wishes.

NABJ, NAHJ, AAJA and NAJA, let's make sure this summer's conventions are steeped in innovation and new media training for our members. It's nearly 2011 and media are evolving and we need to make sure we evolve with it.

• Site managers please look at your staffs. If they are all white, resolve to diversify whether by hiring experienced persons of color or growing your own. I had to build an entire staff of culturally aware content producers in 1999 when BET.com launched at a time when the number of African Americans in new media was woefully small. So I trained black and Latino hip-hop magazine writers, BET television producers and young people straight out of Howard and Hampton universities in new media. Many of them are now leaders at new media companies across the country.

I believe that if there is a will, there is a way. We can't build a strong new media if their content and staffs are not diverse. New media cannot afford to make the same mistakes as old media, especially in the face of a changing America. More journalists of color have to take chances and innovate, whether it is at your legacy media company or at a startup that you form at your kitchen table. Whether you are pushed or you leap, you will need new media skills to get ahead. There is still time and there is still room in the media landscape for a diversity of ideas and people.

October 28 2010

18:33

Notable Moments From the 2010 ONA Conference

"Welcome to the conference where journalism supposedly doesn't know it's supposed to be dead."

Those were the welcoming words from Online News Association executive director Jane McDonnell as she opened the 2010 Online News Association Conference.

Many of the top people in online journalism in the Unites States, Canada and other countries are in Washington, D.C. this week for the conference. I'm here representing PBS MediaShift and OpenFile, the online news startup I'm involved with in Canada. This post is where I'll collect my thoughts, impressions and all of the notable things I see and hear at #ONA10.

Come back over the course of the weekend for the latest updates.

Friday TBD Keynote

The conference program officially kicked off with a keynote discussion featuring key people from TBD.com, the recently launched local news website for the D.C. area. Jim Brady (general manager), Erik Wemple (editor), Mandy Jenkins (social media producer) and Steve Buttry (director of community engagement) took part. Some notable quotes and information:

"The way I phrase [our revenue model] to people is that there's no silver bullet -- it's just shrapnel ... there isn't one stream that's going to make us successful." -- Jim Brady. He also later noted that TBD could roll out paid mobile apps that offer very targeted information and functionality. For now, though, their main apps are free and will likely stay that way.

"Burrell & Associates predicts there will be $1 billion spent this year in local mobile advertising, and they are seeing $11 billion by 21014. That's bigger than last year's decrease in print advertising." -- Steve Buttry

"Our editorial vision is that we try to focus on a few key areas: Transportation, arts and entertainment and sports that cut across the region. We can't be in every jurisdiction. For politics we are doing a fact checking approach ... The vision is just work really hard all the time, and always be checking your device. We are just trying to keep the site refreshed at all times." -- Erik Wemple

"If you run a website that doesn't have something that's terrible on it, you are not trying hard enough. You have to fail, fail, fail. You have to fail and fail miserably many times." -- Erik Wemple

Many Jenkins said that in order to do her job she has 22 columns open in TweetDeck, has keyword searches running constantly, and is reading around 200 news feeds constantly. "I follow a ton of our readers -- pretty much anyone who has sent us a news tip," she said.

"Social media, while it's a great source of information, you have to treat it like a tip line, not like a reporter. It's a matter of checking all of your sources before you run with them, and it's an important part of using [social media tools] responsibly." -- Mandy Jenkins

A lot of news organizations think social media "is a way to get our stuff out to people. [Mandy Jenkins] pushed an idea that it's also the police scanner of the 21st century." -- Jim Brady

"The commodity that's most restricted in people's lives is time." -- Jim Brady

More updates to come...

Craig Silverman is an award-winning journalist and author, and the managing editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He is founder and editor of Regret the Error, the author of Regret the Error: How Media Mistakes Pollute the Press and Imperil Free Speech, and a columnist for Columbia Journalism Review and BusinessJournalism.org and the Toronto Star. He serves as digital journalism director of OpenFile, a collaborative local news site for Canada. Follow him on Twitter at @CraigSilverman.

This is a summary. Visit our site for the full post ».

18:33

Notable Quotes, Impressions and Moments From the 2010 Online News Association Conference

"Welcome to the conference where journalism supposedly doesn't know it's supposed to be dead."

Those were the welcoming words from Online News Association executive director Jane McDonnell as she opened the 2010 Online News Association Conference.

Many of the top people in online journalism in the Unites States, Canada and other countries are in Washington, D.C. this week for the conference. I'm here representing PBS MediaShift and OpenFile, the online news startup I'm involved with in Canada. This post is where I'll collect my thoughts, impressions and all of the notable things I see and hear at #ONA10.

Come back over the course of the weekend for the latest updates.

Friday TBD Keynote

The conference program officially kicked off with a keynote discussion featuring key people from TBD.com, the recently launched local news website for the D.C. area. Jim Brady (general manager), Erik Wemple (editor), Mandy Jenkins (social media producer) and Steve Buttry (director of community engagement) took part. Some notable quotes and information:

"The way I phase [our revenue model] to people is that there's no silver bullet -- it's just shrapnel ... there isn't one stream that's going to make us successful." -- Jim Brady. He also later noted that TBD could roll out paid mobile apps that offer very targeted information and functionality. For now, though, their main apps are free and will likely stay that way.

"Burrell & Associates predicts there will be $1 billion spent this year in local mobile advertising, and they are seeing $11 billion by 21014. That's bigger than last year's decrease in print advertising." -- Steve Buttry

"Our editorial vision is that we try to focus on a few key areas: Transportation, arts and entertainment and sports that cut across the region. We can't be in every jurisdiction. For politics we are doing a fact checking approach ... The vision is just work really hard all the time, and always be checking your device. We are just trying to keep the site refreshed at all times." -- Erik Wemple

"If you run a website that doesn't have something that's terrible on it, you are not trying hard enough. You have to fail, fail, fail. You have to fail and fail miserably many times." -- Erik Wemple

Many Jenkins said that in order to do her job she has 22 columns open in TweetDeck, has keyword searches running constantly, and is reading around 200 news feeds constantly. "I follow a ton of our readers -- pretty much anyone who has sent us a news tip," she said.

"Social media, while it's a great source of information, you have to treat it like a tip line, not like a reporter. It's a matter of checking all of your sources before you run with them, and it's an important part of using [social media tools] responsibly." -- Mandy Jenkins

A lot of news organizations think social media "is a way to get our stuff out to people. [Mandy Jenkins] pushed an idea that it's also the police scanner of the 21st century." -- Jim Brady

"The commodity that's most restricted in people's lives is time." -- Jim Brady

More updates to come...

Craig Silverman is an award-winning journalist and author, and the managing editor of MediaShift and Idea Lab. He is founder and editor of Regret the Error, the author of Regret the Error: How Media Mistakes Pollute the Press and Imperil Free Speech, and a columnist for Columbia Journalism Review and BusinessJournalism.org and the Toronto Star. He serves as digital journalism director of OpenFile, a collaborative local news site for Canada. Follow him on Twitter at @CraigSilverman.

This is a summary. Visit our site for the full post ».

October 07 2010

14:00

Los Angeles Times collaborates across the newsroom and with readers to map neighborhood crime

There’s something about the immediacy of the web that makes interactive features seem effortless: One click and the information is there. But of course the feel of the end product is not the same as the process required to get it there. Just ask the Los Angeles Times.

Last week the Times unveiled a new stage in its ongoing mapping project, Mapping L.A. The latest piece lets users check out crime data by neighborhood, including individual crimes and crime trends. Ultimately, the goal is to give locals access to encyclopedia-style information about their neighborhoods, including demographic, crime, and school information. And for reporters, it’s a helpful tool to add context to a story or spot trends. Getting the project where it is now has been a two-year process, drawing on talent across the newsroom and tapping the expertise of the crowd. I spoke with Ben Welsh, the LAT developer working on the project, about what it’s taken to piece it together. Hint: collaboration.

“I was lucky to find some natural allies who had a vision for what we could find out,” Welsh told me. “In some sense it’s the older generation of geek reporters. There’s this whole kind of tradition of that. We talk the same language. They collect all this data — and I want data so we can do stuff online. Even though we don’t have the same bosses, we have this kind of ad hoc alliance.”

Before Welsh could start plotting information, like crime or demographics data, the Times had to back up to a much simpler question: What are the neighborhood boundaries in Los Angeles city and county?

“Because there are no official answers and there are just sort of consensus and history and these things together, we knew from the get-go it was going to be controversial,” Welsh said. “We designed it from the get-go to let people to tell us we suck.”

And people did. About 1,500 people weighed in on the first round of the Times’ mapping project. A tool allowed users to create their own boundary maps for neighborhoods. Between the first round and second round, the Times made 100 boundary changes. (Compare the original map to the current one.) “I continue to receive emails that we’re wrong,” more than a year later, Welsh said.

An offshoot project of the neighborhood project was a more targeted question that every Angeleno can answer: “What is the ‘West Side’?” Welsh said the hundreds of responses were impassioned and creative. The West Side project was recently named a finalist for the Online News Association’s annual awards in the community collaboration category.

Welsh has now layered census, school, and crime data into the project. Working with those varied government data set brings unique problems. “We put all kinds of hours in to clean the data,” Welsh said. “I think a lot of times journalists don’t talk about that part.” At one point, the Times discovered widespread errors in the Los Angeles Police Department data, for example. The department got an early look at the project and supports the Times’ efforts, and has actually abandoned its own mapping efforts, deciding to use the Times’ instead.

Welsh doesn’t talk about the project in terms of it ever being “finished.” “With everything you add, you hope to make it this living, breathing thing,” he said. In the long-run, he hopes the Times will figure out a way to offer a more sophisticated analysis of the data. “That’s a challenging thing,” he said. In the more immediate future, he hopes to expand the geographic footprint of the project.

September 28 2010

19:02

Online Journalism Awards finalists announced

Finalists for the 2010 Online Journalism Awards were announced today by the Online News Association and its partner, the School of Communication at the University of Miami.

The finalists are:

Knight Award for Public Service
The Las Vegas Sun and the Greenspun Media Group: Do No Harm
Sarasota Herald-Tribune: Flipping Fraud
The Roanoke Times | roanoke.com: I-81: Fear, Facts and the Future

Gannett Foundation Award for Technical Innovation in the Service of Digital Journalism
AP Stylebook Application, site, Twitter feed (123)
CNN iPhone App with iReport integrated
NPR API

General Excellence in Online Journalism, Micro Site
California Watch and the Center for Investigative Reporting
Gotham Gazette
St. Louis Beacon

General Excellence in Online Journalism, Small Site
ProPublica
The Texas Tribune | texastribune.org
voiceofsandiego.org

General Excellence in Online Journalism, Medium Site
The Las Vegas Sun and the Greenspun Media Group
Army Times Publishing Company: Military Times
Mother Jones
Salon Media Group: Salon.com

General Excellence in Online Journalism, Large Site
msnbc.com
NPR: NPR.ORG
New York Media: Nymag.com
The New York Times

General Excellence in Online Journalism, Non-English, Small Site
Cyberpresse.ca
OWNI
Local Foods Yahoo!Taiwan

General Excellence in Online Journalism, Non-English, Large Site
EL PAÍS
SA LA NACION
G1 – TV Globo

Breaking News, Small Site
The Oklahoman / NewsOK.com Staff: May 10 Tornados
The Tennessean: Nashville Flood

Breaking News, Large Site
Boston.com: The death of Edward M. Kennedy
CBC News: G20 Summit
CNN.com: Haiti Earthquake
The Seattle Times: Four Police Officers Slain
The New York Times: Haiti Earthquake Coverage

Specialty Site Journalism, Affiliated
BBC News: Election 2010
CHOW.com
NPR: NPR Music

Specialty Site Journalism, Independent
Curbed Network: Curbed.com
Design Observer Group: Design Observer
theheart.org by WebMD

Gannett Foundation Award for Innovative Investigative Journalism, Small Site
The Center for Public Integrity: Sexual Assault on Campus: A Frustrating Search for Justice
ProPublica, the New Orleans Times-Picayune and Frontline: Law and Disorder
Vancouver Sun: Vanishing Point: A five-part investigative series
voiceofsandiego.org: Out of Reach

Gannett Foundation Award for Innovative Investigative Journalism, Large Site
The Las Vegas Sun and the Greenspun Media Group: Do No Harm
The Los Angeles Times: Toyota: Road to Recall
The Philadelphia Inquirer: Justice Delayed, Dismissed, Denied
NPR, ProPublica, Frontline: Brain Wars: How the Military is Failing the Wounded
The New York Times: Toxic Waters

Multimedia Feature Presentation, Small Site
ABC (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) Innovation: Black Saturday
National Film Board of Canada: This Land
News21: Powering a Nation

Multimedia Feature Presentation, Medium Site
The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum, Domani Studios, The Martin Agency, AOL, AOLNews, AOL SHOUTcast: We Choose the Moon
The Denver Post: American Soldier
The Las Vegas Sun and Greenspun Media Group: Bottoming Out

Multimedia Feature Presentation, Large Site
NPR: Grand Trunk Road
Reuters, Online News and the Thomson Reuters Foundation: Surviving the Tsunami – Stories of Hope
The New York Times: Held by the Taliban
USATODAY: Vancouver Olympics

Multimedia Feature Presentation, Student
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University: SyracuseDiners.com
UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism: A Seed is Forever
UNC School of Journalism: Living Galapagos
Western Kentucky University Fleischaker-Greene Scholars: Farm to Fork: Investigating Agriculture

Online Topical Reporting/Blogging, Small Site
The Center for Public Integrity: Disaster in the Gulf (12)
FLORIDATODAY: The Flame Trench space blog (12)
Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty: Persian Letters (12)
voiceofsandiego.org: Building a Community around Education Coverage (12)

Online Topical Reporting/Blogging, Medium Site
CBC News: Inside Politics Blog (12)
Mother Jones: Team Coverage of BP Oil Spill (12)

Online Topical Reporting/Blogging, Large Site
AOL News: Haiti, Life After Death (12)
CNN.com: Technology (12)
CNN.com: Afghanistan Crossroads (12)

Online Commentary/Blogging, Small Site
Caring.com: Dad Has Dementia (12)
Forward.com: The Sisterhood
Truthdig: Chris Hedges (12)

Online Commentary/Blogging, Medium Site
Salon.com: Glenn Greenwald (12)
Mother Jones: Kevin Drum (12)

Online Commentary/Blogging, Large Site
ESPN.com: Howard Bryant (12)
Politics Daily: Jill Lawrence (12)
The Los Angeles Times: Christopher Knight, Culture Monster (12)

Outstanding Use of Digital Technologies, Professional
CNN.com: Home and Away: U.S. & Coalition Causalities
The Las Vegas Sun and Greenspun Media Group: Bottoming Out
The New York Times: Oil Spill Tracker
The Texas Tribune Data Apps

Outstanding Use of Digital Technologies, Student
No award given

Outstanding Use of Emerging Platforms
NPR.ORG Mobile Applications
USATODAY for iPad

Online Video Journalism, Small Site
Huffington Post Investigative Fund: Tapped Out: How an Unpaid Water Bill Cost a Baltimore Woman Her Home
MediaStorm: Take Care
Minnesota Public Radio News: Explaining Instant Run-off Voting
Yale Environment 360: Leveling Appalachia: The Legacy of Mountaintop Removal Mining

Online Video Journalism, Medium Site
The Las Vegas Sun and the Greenspun Media Group: Bottoming Out (1)
Knoxville News Sentinel / knoxnews.com: Death on Chipman Street
The Dallas Morning News: Choosing Thomas

Online Video Journalism, Large Site
NPR: Krulwich on Science (12)
NPR and ProPublica: Traumatic Brain Injury – The Battle For Care
TIME.com: Sudan Stories
The Toronto Star: William and the Windmill
The Washington Post: Scene In Video Series (12)

Online Video Journalism, Student
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University: The Fall Workshop (12)
Knight Center for International Media, School of Communication, University of Miami: My Story, My Goal

Community Collaboration
CBC News: G20: Street Level
CNN.com: Haiti: The Missing, The Found, The Victims
The Los Angeles Times: Westside Debate
West Seattle Blog: West Seattle’s only 24/7 news source

September 03 2010

10:05

ONA wins grant to overhaul website

Industry group the Online News Association (ONA) has received a $75,000 grant to redesign its website. The funding comes from the Excellence & Ethics in Journalism Foundation (EEJF) and will be used to create an open-source site containing resources and training materials for digital journalists.

Full release from the ONA at this link…Similar Posts:



May 06 2010

08:48

May 05 2010

22:37

NYT Data Journalist Walks Through ‘Toxic Waters’


The New York Times investigation into national water quality and pollution regulation required a tremendous effort in reporting and data analysis. The project, titled “Toxic Waters,” was enhanced by the painstaking efforts of many in the newsroom, including journalist-developer Derek Willis, a member of NYT’s Interactive News Technology team.

He described how the Times produced its award-winning series to members of the Online News Association and Hacks & Hackers in Washington yesterday. Above is the recording of his presentation.

(Note: I’m an active member of both organizations.)

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