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August 23 2010

12:02

August 19 2010

08:00

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – inspiration for photojournalists

Photojournalism: An inspirational blog for budding photographers and working photojournalists from the LA Times, offering great examples of work as well as handy tips on skills and kit. Tipster: Laura Oliver. To submit a tip to Journalism.co.uk, use this link - we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.


August 18 2010

09:39

Paparazzi agencies delay People iPad app launch

Celebrity magazine publishers could have problems getting their products onto the iPad device, according to the Hollywood Reporter, as photo agencies are reportedly “banding together” to try and reach an agreement with one title – People magazine – to seek extra compensation for use of their images.

This has been linked to the postponed launch date of the publication’s new app, although this is denied by a spokesperson for the magazine in the report.

While the standoff centers on one publication for now, just about any other brand that makes photos of the rich and famous their stock in trade is watching nervously from the sidelines. Whatever deal they strike could set the terms of trade for the industry going forward.

See their full report here…Similar Posts:



August 11 2010

11:15

‘We will not be held to ransom’, Bournemouth Echo warns Southampton FC

Bournemouth Echo sports editor Neil Meldrum says the paper “will not be held to ransom” by Southampton Football Club, which recently announced plans to ban press photographers and syndicate the club’s own photographs of the team’s home matches.

Mr Cortese [executive chairman] clearly thinks his club will make a buck or two by syndicating pictures taken by their own man. I’ve got news for you, Nicola: You won’t.

If newspapers hate one thing, it is the greed of people like you and we press people tend to stick together in defiance of arrogance.

Yes, the Echo has let its readers down today by not printing pictures of last night’s match.

But we will not be held to ransom by the likes of Nicola Cortese.

Full post on the Bournemouth Echo blog at this link…Similar Posts:



August 09 2010

14:18
09:39

Bangkok Post publishes Thailand’s first 3D newspaper

A Thai newspaper has become the first in the country to produce a 3D photo edition of its newspaper, according to the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper blog.

The Bangkok Post, an English-language daily, published the special edition to celebrate its 64th anniversary.

The three-dimensional effect was also applied to the advertisements and to a special section called Our Pride, published in celebration of the newspaper recently winning the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers’ (WAN-IFRA) Best Overall Design award in Asia-Pacific and Middle East.

See the full post here…Similar Posts:



July 30 2010

10:28

Controversy over Time Magazine cover showing mutilated Afghan woman

The Atlantic Wire site has published a series of different points of view about this week’s Time Magazine cover, which shows a harrowing image of an 18-year-old Afghan woman who has had her nose and ears cut off by the Taliban.

Under the headline “What Happens if We Leave Afghanistan”, the magazine’s picture caption reports that the woman was attacked for having tried to flee from “abusive in-laws”.

The Wire asks if the Time is right to publish the cover, with answers first quoted from managing editor Richard Stengel discussing the reasons for their decision.

I thought long and hard about whether to put this image on the cover of Time (…) But bad things do happen to people, and it is part of our job to confront and explain them. In the end, I felt that the image is a window into the reality of what is happening — and what can happen — in a war that affects and involves all of us. I would rather confront readers with the Taliban’s treatment of women than ignore it. I would rather people know that reality as they make up their minds about what the U.S. and its allies should do in Afghanistan.

The article then moves to comments from a range of other publications, some who say the cover is “good journalism” while others feel is “oversimplifies war”.

See the full post here…Similar Posts:



July 29 2010

10:40

World Press Photo 2010 tour comes to Edinburgh and London

Winning images from the World Press Photo 2010 contest will be exhibited at the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh from 3 August until 28 August.

The WPP 10 exhibition is touring the the world and will return to the UK for an exhibition at the Royal Festival Hall, London from 12 November until 9 December.

In 2009, Anthony Suau took the top prize in the photography contest for his image of home evictions in Cleveland, Ohio.

See a full list of exhibition dates and locations at this linkSimilar Posts:



July 22 2010

15:33

Photojournalism student’s work captures attention of New Yorker visual editor

A photojournalism student from the University of Gloucestershire has had her work selected and commented on by Elisabeth Biondi, visual editor of the New Yorker.

Along with other final-year students on the photojournalism and documentary photography course, Deborah Coleman submitted a small selection of images from her major project on the Wootton Bassett repatriation to Source, a photography magazine.

Four students from other universities have also had their work analysed by Biondi for the magazine’s website.

See the full selection of images at this link…Similar Posts:



July 10 2010

09:07

Texas newspaper posts video of photographer’s run in with BP and police

A short update to a post from earlier in the week about the case of Lance Rosenfield, a freelance photographer detained in Texas by police, a BP security officer and the city’s police department liaison to the Joint Terrorism Task force.

Rosenfield had been taking photographs of a sign outside BP refinery in Texas City for non-profit news organisation ProPublica and had remained on a public right of way.

Texas newspaper the Daily News has posted three dashboard-camera videos of the exchange between the police and Rosenfield. The News also details the laws under which Rosenfield was asked to reveal his images to police and give his name, phone number and social security number.

The audio in these videos is poor due to wind, but they show a relatively relaxed situation in which police try to determine that Rosenfield has no suspicious motive for photographing an oil refinery.

Full post at this link…

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July 07 2010

22:20

Apply now for the Ian Parry Scholarship – deadline extended to this Friday, July 9

Good news for anyone considering applying to this year’s Ian Parry Scholarship:

The Ian Parry Scholarship 2010 deadline has been extended to Friday 9th July 10am (UK Time). Applications are digital. FTP instructions and application forms are available from www.ianparry.org

The Ian Parry Scholarship is designed to award young photojournalists with a bursary that will enable them to undertake a chosen project and raise their profile in the international photographic community. The Scholarship is aimed at traditional or contemporary photojournalism and photographers with strong story telling capabilities.

Ian Parry was a photojournalist who died whilst on assignment for the Sunday Times during the Romanian revolution in 1989. He was just 24 years old. The Scholarship was set up by Aidan Sullivan and Ian’s friends and family in order to build something positive from such a tragic death.

The competition is for photographers on full-time photographic courses or who are 24 years or under. The prize is £3,000 towards an assignment, a commission for Save The Children plus £500 for runners up.

July 06 2010

17:10

ProPublica photographer followed by BP employee, detained by police

Police in England have come in for a fair amount of criticism recently for their treatment of photographers (see here and here), but their US counterparts have received some attention too after detaining freelance photographer Lance Rosenfeld, who was working for ProPublica at the time.

Rosenfeld was driving away after taking photos of a BP refinery in Texas City, Texas when he was followed by a BP employee, blocked off by two police cars and detained. Rosenfeld had remained in a public space outside the refinery while working. The police reviewed his pictures and recorded his date of birth, Social Security number and other personal information. According to Rosenfeld these details were then shared with BP.

Paul Steiger, editor-in-chief of ProPublica, said:

“We certainly appreciate the need to secure the nation’s refineries. But we’re deeply troubled by BP’s conduct here, especially when they knew we were working on deadline on critical stories about this very facility. And we see no reason why, if law enforcement needed to review the unpublished photographs, that should have included sharing them with a representative of a private company.”

Full story at this link…

via Fishbowl NY blogSimilar Posts:



June 29 2010

13:58

Police remove teenage photographer from parade, citing terrorism act

Jules Mattsson, a 16-year-old photographer, challenged police officers attempting to restrict his photographing of an Armed Forced Parade in Romford on Saturday. As the recording posted to YouTube demonstrates, Mattsson was unrelenting in asserting his rights to the policeman, who eventually resorted to telling him he was a “threat under the terrorism act” and confiscating his camera. Mattsson can then be heard accusing the officer of pushing him down a flight of stairs.

Mattsson writes about the incident on his blog:

Especially poignant this incident took place the day after photojournalist Marc Vallee and videographer Jason Parkinson won their case against the met for an incident outside the Greek Embassy where Marc had his camera grabbed and Jason had his lens covered by an armed police officer. Many have hailed this ruling as ‘a victory for press freedom’, and I would be inclined to agree. However, until the met’s guidance on photography and a clearer understanding of the law filters down to the streets, we will continue to see incidents like this.

Read more on the Marc Vallee/Jason Parkinson case on Journalism.co.uk.


Source: Boing BoingSimilar Posts:



June 18 2010

09:29

Flickr/Getty deal brings new revenue opportunity for photographers

The photo-sharing website Flickr has introduced a new option which allows photographers to publicly nominate their images for licensing by Getty.

When another user sees an image they would like to licence, they will be put in touch with Getty to arrange the sale.

In short, the new Flickr/Getty feature, called Request to License, lets photographers nominate their photos directly to users searching for photos to license – without first going through Getty.

Cnet News has a report with a bit of context here:

In Flickr’s initial partnership with photo licensing powerhouse Getty Images, Getty representatives cherry-picked Flickr photos and photographers they liked. Later, Flickr members could offer their own candidates for evaluation by Getty for licensing.

More detail from the Flickr blog:

When a prospective licensee sees an image marked for license, they can click on the link and be put in touch with a representative from Getty Images who will help handle details like permissions, releases and pricing. Once reviewed, the Getty Images editors will send you a FlickrMail to request to license your work, either for commercial or editorial usage. The decision to license is always yours.

Flickr recently added the 100,000th photo to the Flickr Collection on Getty Images.

Similar Posts:



June 11 2010

08:00

#Tip of the day from Journalism.co.uk – police guidelines for treatment of photographers

Photography rights: the Metropolitan Police recently issued guidelines that lay out how police should treat camera owners and users. For more explanation read this FreelanceUK article. Tipster: Judith Townend. To submit a tip to Journalism.co.uk, use this link - we will pay a fiver for the best ones published.


June 03 2010

15:56
09:10

Photographer tracks down subjects from 30-year-old photos

From last week a nice story from Peterborough Today (and picked up elsewhere) about photographer Chris Porsz – nicknamed the ‘paramedic paparazzo’ because of his day job – who with the help of the local paper has tracked down some of the subjects of photos he took in the 1980s, finding out what had happened to the people in them and recreating the original pictures.

Full story at this link…

More pictures from Porsz are featured in this Mail Online article.

Similar Posts:



May 15 2010

07:23

When Mount St. Helens came to (my) town

Thirty years ago on May 18, 1980, I was a senior in high school in Spokane, Washington. It was Sunday afternoon and I was still feeling the pain from a beer-induced hangover, you know, the only kind you can get when your best friend Russ throws an  “End of High School” party for most of the senior class.

I grabbed a cup of coffee and went out on Russ’s front porch.  Glancing up at the sky I was perplexed at what I saw. Instead of blue sky, it was brown with a pillow texture to it. “ Must be a dust storm coming,” said my friend’s father who also had no answer for weird brown sky. Suddenly, a robin came fluttering in front of us. It dove hard, landing dead on impact at my feet. I gingerly picked the bird up and when I shook it, a small cloud of dust came off its wings.  What the…

I would soon find out that Mount St. Helens, 290 miles away, had literally exploded in a cataclysmic volcanic eruption. The best part? A dark cloud of ash would soon turn  daylight into darkness. It rained ash overnight and part of the next day. For the next week communities in Central and Eastern Washington banded together to clean up the mess. Ask anyone who experienced the ash fall and I’ll guarantee they’ll have a story to tell.

A week ago, it was politely suggested to me that I should do a multimedia piece for the Mount St. Helens 30th anniversary coming up.

“Sure I can do that, I said. “I’m sure we have tons of photos in the digital archive.”

A quick look showed only a few pictures from that time, many of which had been used over and over. A trip in the print photo archive left me nowhere. It was as if Mount St. Helens ash never came to Spokane. “ Where the hell were all the photos”?

Searching the negative archive I found the whole weeks worth of negatives missing from the box. About to give up, I walked to the far dark corner of the neg room on a hunch. I found a shelf of orphan negative boxes labeled with old projects I was hard pressed to remember.  Running my finger down the labels I stopped on the three words: “Mount St. Helens. “

Bingo!

I think over the years and many volcano anniversaries later, long gone photo editors found that putting all the prints and negs in one box was a good idea. If I hadn’t made that turn into a dark corner, this audio slideshow would have been pretty lame.

My next chore was to find someone willing to write and voice a narrative that would reflect the content of the photos I had edited together.  My go-to guy for historical narratives is staff writer Jim Kershner.

“You wanna do a Looking Back piece for St. Helen 30th”? I asked Kershner.

I could tell Kershner was swamped, but he said he could probably crank something out by the next afternoon.  I told Kershner just to write the story of the first week in Spokane and I would match the photos up with whatever he  wrote.  The next day as I was pawing through old unlabeled negative sheets, Kershner arrived with a killer script in hand. Only two takes later, I was ready to start assembling our St Helens story.  I like to use Final Cut Pro as I find it gives me the most flexibility with photos. I can color correct, put motion on the photo, create multi-photo windows where I can time the show to the beat of the music.

The fun part of this story for me was really the detective part, where I had to find a photo that would match the narrative. When Kershner said “Soon taverns and golf courses began to reopen,” I was lucky enough to find a photo from that week  showing rednecks covered in ash drinking tavern beer and a group of lady golfers walking an ash-laden course.

For music, our company has an extensive Digital Juice music library I can use for multimedia projects such as this. I also used a couple of Garage Band stingers– short mood building clips–that helped set the ominous tone of the ash cloud coming our way.

All in all, it was a fun project to do in such a short amount of time.


May 11 2010

19:26

Crowdsourcing goes global: The NYT’s “Moment in Time”

Visit the New York Times’ Lens blog today, and you’ll find an image slightly different from the high-quality photographs that normally populate the outlet: a spinning globe, highly stylized, its surface popping with piles of pictures.

“Here it is,” the site announces: “Earth, covered by stacks of thousands of virtual photographs, corresponding in location to where they were taken by Lens readers at one ‘Moment in Time.’”

The moment in question? Sunday before last, at 11 a.m. EST — the time when the paper asked its users to take photos in an image-gathering project that was equal parts collaborative art and crowdsourcing on steroids.

The invitation to participate:

Attention: everyone with a camera, amateur or pro. Please join us on Sunday, May 2, at 15:00 (U.T.C./G.M.T.), as thousands of photographers simultaneously record “A Moment in Time.” The idea is to create an international mosaic, an astonishingly varied gallery of images that are cemented together by the common element of time.

The feature’s editors — James Estrin, who conceived of it and oversaw its implementation, David Dunlap (who wrote much of the project’s witty instructions and textual updates), and Josh Haner (who, along with Aron Pilhofer, Jacqui Maher, and the Times’ vaunted interactive news team, helped facilitate the behind-the-scenes tech masterminding) — expected that the blog’s invitation would elicit a couple thousand photos. And that organizing and presenting them would take a couple days.

But: they received, in the end, over 10,000 user-generated submissions, Estrin told me — from photographers amateur and professional, from around the world. (Actually, they received over 13,000 at first — then removed some from the pile when it became obvious, whether by lighting or timestamp or other indicators, that the photos weren’t, in fact, taken at the allotted time.) And the process of organizing all that content took well over a week — a fact about which Dunlap repeatedly (and wittily) apologized. In a post entitled “Patience,” Dunlap wrote, “We have to ask it of you once again. Our interactive ‘Moment in Time’ gallery isn’t ready yet.”

We were bold — O.K., maybe a bit foolhardy — to think we would only need two or three days to prepare a complex three-dimensional computer display showing more than 13,000 photographs from around the world; organized geographically and searchable by topic, with captions and photo credits as coherent and accurate as possible. It’s obviously taken us longer than that and will almost certainly take us a day or two more. (We’re getting out of the prediction business for now.) We simply hadn’t had the experience of dealing with such numbers before. The popular “Documenting the Decade” project, for example, drew only 2,769 submissions.

Please bear with us while we take the time we need to get it right…Be assured that we’ll post as soon as we can. And don’t think for a moment that we’ve been using this time to weed out pictures of cats, dogs, tulips and coffee cups. There’ll be plenty.

And plenty, indeed, there are. The pictures (sortable by fellow-user recommendation, but also by Community, Arts and Entertainment, Family, Money and the Economy, Nature and the Environment, Play, Religion, Social Issues, Work, and — my personal favorite — Other) are, in general, high-quality and compelling. There’s the predictable fare — meditative close-ups of flowers, pictures of cats — but there’s also more surprising and evocative stuff: a grandmother and grandson in Bangladesh, a couple lounging in bed (caption: “My boyfriend and I planned a big adventure for Sunday morning, but we both ended up sick”), an Amish horse-and-buggy (caption: “We live in a part of Pennsylvania where wifi and No-fi coexist pretty well”).

“A Moment in Time” (and, with that, I’ll try not to use the project’s name again in this post — so that you won’t, as I did, get something unfortunate stuck in your head as a result of repeated exposure) is aesthetically compelling and socially revealing. It also suggests the Times’ openness to exploring avenues of documentation and expression that don’t fall into the neat categories of traditional journalism.

“I was driving to work, and it just hit me: Okay, we’ll get thousands of people around the world to take a photograph at the same moment,” Estrin told me of the project’s inception. And the goals of the project mix the artistic and the journalistic to the point that it’s difficult to tell where the journalism ends and the aesthetic begins: first, to produce a valuable document, one that records — to an extent — a particular moment as it’s lived out across the world. Second, from the social media angle, to facilitate the sense of shared identity that comes with “doing things as a community around the world — doing the same things at the same time.” Ultimately, Estrin says, the project was about “the intentional profundity of the moment.”

Whether the feature represents journalism, or something more, or something less, the reaction it’s received from Times users offers a lesson for news organizations chasing after the holy grail-and-sometimes-white-whale that is reader engagement. If the project’s participatory outpouring is any indication, it has struck a nerve with Times users. In a good way. And the ‘why’ in that is instructive. The project involved an assignment with specific instructions; users weren’t merely being asked for something — a hazy invitation to contribute — but to provide something specific, and easily attainable. And to provide something, moreover, that would be part of a project with a clearly defined, but also inspiring, purpose: to document the world, via its many corners, at a particular moment. That mix of depth and breadth, of pragmatism and idealism, can be a potent incitement to action — a fact evidenced by the thousands of images currently blanketing the globe over at the Lens blog.

April 06 2010

13:30

Check out the future of photography: The current issue of Nieman Reports

Written journalism isn’t the only form being radically transformed by technology. Sure, the Internet may have eliminated the monopoly that the Gotham Morning News enjoyed, and any web page could be one link away from the attention of millions. But photojournalism is also having both its distribution model and its production model changed. The old client news organizations aren’t paying any more (at least not as much). The price of quality cameras has dropped so much that a skill-less amateur can, almost by accident, create a great shot. And a good photo gets spread around the Internet so quickly that maintaining ownership — and the money that comes with it — can be almost impossible.

Those issues are some of the ones that the current issue of Nieman Reports wrestles with. Where is photojournalism headed? Is it into a headlong embrace of new technologies? Toward a business model that can sustain professional work? Or toward a model in which an army of cameraphones are good enough? As Nieman Reports editor Melissa Ludtke puts it in her intro to the issue:

Photojournalism’s destination and audience, once pre-ordained by the news organizations that paid the cost of doing business, are now in flux. Digital possibilities are limitless, but what is now required of photojournalists are an entrepreneurial mindset and a facility with digital tools. On the Web, photographs now act as gateways to information and context, to stories told by participants and conversations held by viewers.

Here are some of the stories Lab readers will be interested in:

— Ed Kashi writes about shifting to multimedia in the age of declining traditional media.

— Brian Storm talks with Melissa about the new digital distribution model for photography.

— VII’s Stephen Mayes talks about the shifting roles of photo agencies.

— Ian Ginsberg compares photojournalism’s changes to those of the music industry.

— Turi Munthe explains the digital wire service they’ve built at Demotix.

The entire issue is worth your time.

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