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August 02 2011

05:47

Japan - Nuclear plant workers developed cancer despite lower radiation exposure

There is no reason to believe that low(er) radiation exposure is more safe. The following story reported by The Mainichi Daily reminds us of the workers still staying at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. It shows that we should not feel too save if we hear exposure is below legal limits. It's a deathly job and it will be the same tomorrow.

Mainichi Daily :: Of 10 nuclear power plant workers who have developed cancer and received workers' compensation in the past, nine had been exposed to less than 100 millisieverts of radiation, it has been learned. The revelation comes amid reports that a number of workers battling the crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant were found to have been exposed to more than the emergency limit of 250 millisieverts, which was raised from the previous limit of 100 millisieverts in March.

Continue to read mdn.mainichi.jp

June 30 2011

05:04

Japan after March 11th - 24m tons: debris removal, recycling daunting, piecemeal labor

Japan Times :: According to the Environment Ministry, roughly 24 million tons of disaster waste was generated from the three hardest-hit prefectures: For Miyagi the total runs to 16 million tons, while Iwate faces 4.5 million tons and Fukushima 2.8 million tons. Together it easily exceeds the 14.5 million tons Hyogo Prefecture had to deal with following the 1995 Great Hanshin Earthquake.

In addition to the scale of the disaster, experts say the complex ways the debris was created adds to the headache.

Continue to read (photos available) search.japantimes.co.jp

June 14 2011

05:43

Fukushima Daiichi - Young parents continue to leave the towns near the nuclear power plant

Mainichi :: Young parents are moving away from towns near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant as areas of high radiation continue to be discovered, raising fears over the effects on young children.

I can't stop thinking about the power plant. I can't smile or laugh with all my heart," says Aki Ohashi, 30, tearfully as she cares for her children in her home here.

Published June 11, 2011

Continue to read mdn.mainichi.jp

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