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April 16 2013

00:54

Adobe Launches Collaborative Editing Solution at NAB

LAS VEGAS  —  At NAB last week,  Adobe presented its collaborative editing solution called Adobe Anywhere.  At the show, we  interviewed Adobe Anywhere Senior Product Manager Michael Coleman about the product.

Coleman explained, “Anywhere is going to allow professionals that are working with Premiere Pro and Prelude to collaborate on media over the network.”  Groups of people can work on centrally-located shared productions from anywhere in the world. “It’s a really big shift in the way people work.”

Adobe Anywhere doesn’t use proxy files, says Coleman.  “We work directly with high resolution media, and we have a new technology called the Adobe Mercury streaming engine that will send the high res media all the way across the network to the editor who’s working right in Premiere Pro and Prelude.  It’s a great way to work and it’s a huge advance in productivity.”

Coleman explains more about the product and target user, as well as gives a short demo of Adobe Anywhere, in the video interview.

Megan O’Neill

January 17 2012

09:48

Max from sbooth.org

If you would like to convert your audio from one format to another, Max can read and write audio files in over 20 compressed and uncompressed formats at almost all sample rates and and in most sample sizes.

December 18 2011

05:48

December 01 2011

15:20

LocalWiki Launches First Pilot, Announces Major Software Release

Hey friends! We've got two extremely exciting announcements for you. Our first focus community, serving Denton, Texas, has launched. And we're making the first major release of the new LocalWiki software today!

denton_cheers_small.jpg

The LocalWiki project is an ambitious effort to create community-owned, living information repositories that will provide much-needed context behind the people, places, and events that shape our communities. We were awarded a 2010 Knight News Challenge grant to create an entirely new sort of software to make our vision of massively collaborative local media a reality.

Launching our first pilot

The DentonWiki, serving the community of Denton, Texas, has officially launched to the public. Check it out.

texas_bound_email.jpg

Denton is a small, college-focused community in North Texas, about an hour from Dallas. Being a college town, it's easy to see parallels to Davis, Calif. But it's a radically different place than Davis, as anyone who's been to the Dallas area can attest.

Folks in Denton had been building up and playing around with their project for a few months. With the new LocalWiki software at a good point, and a solid amount of interesting pages on their project, I packed up and headed out to Denton for two weeks to help them get their project ready to launch.

We held several marathon editing/hang-out sessions while there, met with lots of local Denonites, got a feel for the community, and did a bunch of work to prep the site for launch.

editing_hangout.jpg

The Denton project has already seen a higher level of participation and usage than DavisWiki did in its early days. And we're really seeing our extreme focus on usability pay off -- I watched many non-technical people simply get handed a laptop and just immediately start creating great stuff without any guidance.

If you want to read more about DentonWiki and the launch process there, check out some information we're compiling on our guide site.

This first focus community launch -- the first of many -- is a huge milestone for the project.

LocalWiki software released

Today we are also excited to announce the first major release of the LocalWiki software! Check it out at localwiki.org. Make sure you watch the video.

screenshot.png

Starting today, any community can create a local wiki using our new software. The software is designed to be installed by someone who's somewhat technical -- someone who's had some experience working with Linux, for instance. We worked hard to make the software as easy to install as possible.

Most people will simply use the software -- not install it, though. We're hoping that over the coming months many technically-savvy community champions will set up LocalWiki for their communities. The localwiki.org site is currently focused on targeting these sort of technically minded folks.

There's a list of communities currently running LocalWiki here (and a map here). We'll let you know as more come online, develop and launch!

There's so much more we have planned for the LocalWiki software -- but this day marks a significant step toward realizing the dream of collaborative, community-run media in every local community.

xo-
Philip & Mike

A version of this post first appeared on the LocalWiki blog.

October 07 2011

15:00

Apply or nominate for the Antonio Pizzigati Prize!

Through October 31, 2011 you can apply or nominate  for the Antonio Pizzigati Prize. The challenge annually awards open source software developers. The 10,000 USD prize is founded by The Florence and Frances Family Fund of Tides Foundation and honors the brief life Tony Pizzigati, an early advocate of open source computing.

“And The Prize Goes To...”


The Pizzigati Prize challenge seeks to recognize developers who are making a two-faceted contribution to social change. First, they have an important practical impact: their software helps nonprofits both become more effective on a daily basis and build their capacity to better inform and mobilize their constituents. In addition, public interest software developers play a broader role. The ideals of public interest computing, as they have evolved inside the open source movement, promote collaboration and sharing.


Applicants will be evaluated by an advisory panel that includes past winners of the Prize on a range of criteria. The winner is expected to have:

  • Developed an elegant open source software product that serves a critical need in the broader U.S.-based nonprofit community
  • Evolved a plan to scale the product through wide distribution of the code
  • Exemplified the values of public interest computing
  • Demonstrated vision and inspired innovation in the field of public interest computing

 

All completed application materials for the 2012 prize competition including

  • an application
  • nomination form, as well as
  • a link pointing to the the relevant software

must be sent in one email to pizzigatiprize@tides.org no later than by 5pm EST, October 31, 2011.  The Tides Foundation, as host of the prize process, will name the next annual Pizzigati Prize winner at the Nonprofit Technology Network's  2012 Nonprofit Technology Conference in April 2012.

 

Do more

 

January 08 2011

13:02

Boxee Readies Launch Of Hulu Plus and Netflix

LAS VEGAS -- Fresh on the heels on the announcement to stream CBS television programming on the Boxee platform, the service will launch Vudu this week and will soon provide Hulu Plus and Netflix, says Avner Ronen, CEO in this interview with Beet.TV

We caught up with him at the CES show earlier this week.

 

December 20 2010

03:09

Blip.tv Readies HTML5 as its Standard Player, Replacing Flash

While most of the the major video sites and online video services providers are providing HTML5 support, primarily for Apple iOS devices, Blip.tv is going to adopt HTML5 as its standard player for the Web and other platforms, says Justin Day, co-founder and CTO in this interview with Beet.TV

Day says that HTML5, which runs within the browser without a Flash plug-in, runs "faster."

Although no date is set for shift to HTML5, Day told me that it will likely take place in Q1 of 2011.

Kaltura is the only major online video services company which is exclusively HTML5

The "battle" between HTML5 and Flash will be one of the most interesting developments to watch in 2011.

Blip.tv is primarily a site for eposide online video programming. The company said it had 100 million video views in October.  

Beet.TV uses Blip as its principal video player.

Andy Plesser

 

 

 

 

 

December 10 2010

18:22

Teleprompters…

Courtesy Creative Commons

Somehow I’ve always taken teleprompters for granted. Never had to deal with them myself ’cause I always worked wild and free in the field and rarely inside the confines of the station. But they are there and used daily, by anchors on news sets and by glassy eyed wanna-bes elsewhere. Heck, even the President uses it daily. And with today’s complex stories and the need to get facts straight, they are becoming part of the VJ’s toolkit.

What exactly IS a teleprompter? Well, first let’s break the word down into its roots. Tele means distant or far. Prompter refers to a person who is offstage reading a play from a book, providing the actors (talent) with their lines. Thus a teleprompter is something that provides lines or information from a distance.

However in these highly technological times we really don’t want someone offstage passing along forgotten lines in a harsh stage whisper. So we resort to a printed script projected where the speaker can see and read it at his or her own pace.

There are usually two parts to this distance prompter. Hardware and software. Below I’ll review some inexpensive or free options for both, as well as link to some pro gear sites.

Now the easiest way to prompt from a distance is with plain old paper and markers. Get a big sheet of paper (or a white board) and write down your script. Then, when ready, hold up the paper out of sight of the audience so the speaker can read along. Problem with that is the speaker must look over towards the script…and if the “teleprompter” is hidden from the audience, then he will be looking away from them. Makes it kinda obvious. And if you’re taping, from the camera’s perspective, she will be looking off screen – and THAT will make the speaker look shifty-eyed.

Next best is a desktop or laptop with software loaded…either sitting near the camera or even on the desk in front of the talent. A bit better, but there is still the problem of talent not looking directly at the camera lens. Actually the laptop on the desk is workable because an audience watching would realize and accept that the talent is checking either a script or facts.

So the next level is a combination of hardware and software that allows the image to be projected onto a surface that only the speaker can see. I’m going to skip how it is done for public speakers (think Presidential), but the concept is pretty much the same, although without a camera.

So – hardware first. We’ll assume you already have the necessary gear – a camera, mike, lights and talent. Your hardware will cost you anything from a few dollars to as much as you care to spend.

My choice is always to check out low end first.

Here’s an example: PromptDog’s do it yourself teleprompter plan. For this you’ll need a cardboard box, flatscreen monitor (your laptop lcd should do fine), glass or acrylic, black fabric, and a few other items. PromptDog suggests you feed from your computer to a flatscreen in the box so you can control the pacing of the words…but you could also position your laptop in there and use a remote. No estimated cost give, but since the main cost is the glass, maybe under $25.00. For some reason the diagram on the main page shows half-silvered glass but that is specified in the actual plan. You want one-way glass so the camera can see through it while the talent reads from the other side. Oh – and you also get a discount coupon for PromptDog’s software with the plans.

And <a href="

“>here’s a video for another plan. It’s kind of bulky and only good for in-house use.

For other plans just Google “teleprompter plans.” One of the results that came up was Top Twenty site that gave even more options, one of which is Teleprompter Mirrors. On this site you can get prompters, plans, and even free software.

You can also buy the prompters, again costing from around one hundred dollars and up. One of the low end prompters I’m tempted to try is the QuickPrompt from telepromptermirrors.com. The price is right and it seems simple to set up and use.

And here’s just a list of sites I found that look interesting enough to research:

Bodelin
prompterpeople
teleprompters.com

Once you get past the hardware, you’ll need software. Many of the hardware site have links to free or for-pay software. Below are some that I’ve used.

VideoCue Pro, Prompt 7 Lite, MirrorScript Pro

There are dozens more out there…from freeware to shareware to full scale full cost applications. Here’s one suggested by 10,000words.

How to choose? You want a few basics, which include

1. Ability to type lengthy scripts (some of the shareware or freeware may have limited abilities here)
2. Choice of white on black or black on white. Color does NOT matter here. Oh – and with BIG clear font choices. You want your talent to be able to see the type from a distance of anywhere from four or five feet to maybe up to ten or fifteen feet.
3. Ability to control speed of your content. Either you or (preferably) your talent needs to be able to control the speed of the type as it scrolls up the page so that they can read at a natural pace.

And finally…once you have it all together…PRACTICE. That glassy-eyed look you see with some inexperienced on-air folks doesn’t mean they are stoned or their minds are wandering. It means that, despite the hardware and software that are meant to make them look like pros, they HAVE NOT PRACTICED. And they are reading word for word directly off the prompter and not looking beyond the prompter into the lens and at their audience. The teleprompter is exactly that – a distance aid to help on-air, on-camera folks who have already familiarized themselves with the script, present their lines accurately.

BTW: if you have favorites or suggestions, add them to the comments below. I know I’ve just barely skimmed the surface here.


December 06 2010

01:01

W3C's Le Hegaret: Developer "Sentiment" is Building Around Google's WebM Video Codec

CAMBRIDGE, Mass -- With its acquisition of ON2 and its video codec VP8,  Google is seeking to establish a unified, industry-wide codec for publishers to create HTML5 video.

Google's effort is called the WebM Project. It involves several industry hardware and software companies including Adobe.

Recently Beet.TV visited the offices of the W3C, the global, non-profit organization headed by Tim Berners-Lee, which sets standards for the Web.   The W3C is headquartered on the MIT campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Philippe Le Hegaret, W3C interaction domain leader, who heads the video standards group for the W3C, is interviewed here.

In a nuanced and decidedly diplomatic conversation, he said while a standard around one codec for HTML5 is not yet settled, he sees "potential" with WebM. 

When asked about the performance of WebM vs. Ogg Theora, Le Hegarert cites community "sentiment" which finds that WebM has better performance interms of "bandwidth and quality."

The difference in performance is not suprising as Ogg is based on an earlier ON2 codec.

Also in the interview he speaks about evolving standards for surfacing metadata from videos.  He explains how standards around metadata and video will likely be standarized next year.

Andy Plesser

November 11 2010

15:01

Nominate a Developer Working Towards Social Change for this Year's Pizzigati Prize

Nominations are now open for the fifth annual awarding of the $10,000 Antonio Pizzigati Prize for Software in the Public Interest, an award aimed at software developers working with nonprofits to help forge innovative social change. The prize welcomes applications from — and nominations of — single individuals who have demonstrated leadership in the field of public interest software. 

Prize criteria:

read more

November 08 2010

11:28

"The World of Flash and HTML5 will be a Great One," Adobe's Kevin Towes

LOS ANGELES -- The talk of platform wars between Flash and HTML5 has apparently ended, at least publicly from Adobe's side.

Adobe's Kevin Towes tells Beet.TV that "the Web is ready for HTML5" and Adobe is supporting its development through its popular authoring tool Dreamweaver.

We spoke with him last week at the Streaming Media West conference.  Our correspendent Jamison Tilsner caught up with him at the show.

He also speaks about the latest introduction of the company's new Flash severs and how it supports delivery of high quality video effectively through P2P and multicast to various devices including Google TV.

Andy Plesser

Jamison is a contributor to Beet.TV.  HIs day job is Evangelist at Kantar Video.  

November 02 2010

10:34

Adobe's Flash Has Bridge to HTML5 with New Conversion Tool

Last week, Adobe announced it was providing developers with a tool to convert Flash video files to HTML5, the new format which is increasingly widespread on mobile devices.

The tool that allows this conversion is from open source video platform company Kaltura.  Kaltura has provided Adobe with the code based on its open source library.

Yesterday, we spoke with Kaltura co-founder and president Michal Tsur about the new widget and the opportunities for developers using Adobe tools to be integrated into the emerging world of HTML5.

Of the battle between Apple and Adobe over Flash, she declares "there is no war."

Andy Plesser

October 25 2010

09:35

Net2 Think Tank Round-up: Creating Awesome Video

For this month's Net2 Think Tank we asked you to share your tools and tactics for creating effective video messages - regardless of budget and organization size. Affordable video capability and basic editing software are now widely available and easy to use. But, how can organizations and enterprises best use video to inspire change? Below is a list of tips and suggestions on making decisions to do with hardware and software, message and editing, video quality, and promotion ideas. 

read more

October 21 2010

19:45

Diminished reality…

This via OHITLT and crunchgear.com: real time manipulation of video.

Huh? What doest THAT mean?

Well…let’s say you’re setting up for a live skype and you notice there chipped paint on the wall behind you. No time to grab a brush and fix it, so you hop into your Diminished Reality software and erase it.
Here’s the link to the crunchvideo article.

Now for the real meat of this. Sometimes technology gives us wings to go where we shouldn’t go. I can see this or filmmaking…for fun. But for news?

Hey! Let’s clean up that background a bit…get rid of the graffiti on the wall…maybe cover up those stupid kids who are screwing up the scenery. Remove the offensive sign in the live shot of the demonstration.

Don’t even wanna go there…


October 17 2010

21:44

HTML5 Video is Not Ready for the Web, W3C's Le Hargaret

CAMBRIDGE, Mass -- Despite the growing demand for HTML5, and its deployment by many big online players, its commercial introduction is premature as there is no standard for the new technology, says Philippe Le Hargaret, leader of effort at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to establish standards for HTML and SVG.

This lack of standardization will create problems interoperability as publishers embrace different implementations.   Le Hargaret's warnings about the early adoption of HTML5 was reported last week in Info World.

In an interview earlier week in his office on the MIT campus, Le Hagaret told Beet.TV that a standard for HTML5 will be finaized in 2011.  While he says that some implementations work well, notably for mobile devices (we assume he is referrring to Apple), the lack of standarization around HTML for devices is also a problem.

The issue is starting to make waves in the developer community, with engineers at Facebook pushing back on the W3C' s caution about standarization, reported Stephen Shankland at CNET earlier this week.

In addition to the lack of standardization and its related issues, he addressed some issues about privacy and the problems created with HTML5 content downloaded to a desktop.  Some of these issues were raised by The New York Times this week.

This is the first of two interviews with Le Hargaret.

Andy Plesser

October 05 2010

17:06

Android's Massive Success Due to Verizon, NPD's Ross Rubin

Today's news from Nielsen about the fast growth of Android to become the most popular mobile operating system in the U.S. owes much of its success to the support of Verizon Wireless, says Ross Rubin, lead technology analayst at the NPD Group.

Rubin says that Verizon's predominent installed base and price support for the sophisticated device are the key factors in its success.

This is one of three video segments we produced from out conversation.

Andy Plesser

14:26

BlackBerry, Qualcomm in $10 Million Round for Facial Recognition Firm

Viewdle, the facial recognition company with its origins in the Soviet military, has closed a $10 million funding round  with the the BlackBerry VC fund and Qualcomm, David Kaplan at paidContent reports on the deal this morning.

In July, I interviewed John Albright, co-managing partner of the BlackBerry fund and its investment in Viewdle.  He explains how the Viewdle technology will be integrated into handsets from several manufacturers next year.  

When we reported the investment in July, the amount of the investment and other participants on the round were not disclosed.

I interviewed him at the paidContent mobile conference in Manhattan.

Andy Plesser

October 04 2010

02:13

August 23 2010

17:30

Wordpress Software?

Getting pretty tired of WP's clunky backend interface. Is there easy to use desktop software that will allow me to manage and edit posts, and also work with the plugins I use? (Publish2, image galleries, etc.)

August 13 2010

15:52
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