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January 16 2012

14:28

Comment call: Objectivity and impartiality – a newsroom policy for student projects

I’ve been updating a newsroom policy guide for a project some of my students will be working on, with a particular section on objectivity and impartiality. As this has coincided with the debate on fact-checking stirred by the New York Times public editor Arthur Brisbane, I thought I would reproduce the guidelines here, and invite comments on whether you think it hits the right note:

Objectivity and impartiality: newsroom policy

Objectivity is a method, not an element of style. In other words:

  • Do not write stories that give equal weight to each ‘side’ of an argument if the evidence behind each side of the argument is not equal. Doing so misrepresents the balance of opinions or facts. Your obligation is to those facts, not to the different camps whose claims may be false.
  • Do not simply report the assertions of different camps. As a journalist your responsibility is to check those assertions. If someone misrepresents the facts, do not simply say someone else disagrees, make a statement along the lines of “However, the actual wording of the report…” or “The official statistics do not support her argument” or “Research into X contradict this.” And of course, link to that evidence and keep a copy for yourself (which is where transparency comes in).

Lazy reporting of assertions without evidence is called the ‘View From Nowhere’ – you can read Jay Rosen’s Q&A or the Wikipedia entry, which includes this useful explanation:

“A journalist who strives for objectivity may fail to exclude popular and/or widespread untrue claims and beliefs from the set of true facts. A journalist who has done this has taken The View From Nowhere. This harms the audience by allowing them to draw conclusions from a set of data that includes untrue possiblities. It can create confusion where none would otherwise exist.”

Impartiality is dependent on objectivity. It is not (as subjects of your stories may argue) giving equal coverage to all sides, but rather promising to tell the story based on objective evidence rather than based on your own bias or prejudice. All journalists will have opinions and preconceived ideas of what a story might be, but an impartial journalist is prepared to change those opinions, and change the angle of the story. In the process they might challenge strongly-held biases of the society they report on – but that’s your job.

The concept of objectivity comes from the sciences, and this provides a useful guideline: scientists don’t sit between two camps and repeat assertions without evaluating them. They identify a claim (hypothesis) and gather the evidence behind it – both primary and secondary.

Claims may, however, already be in the public domain and attracting a lot of attention and support. In those situations reporting should be open about the information the journalist does not have. For example:

  • “His office, however, were unable to direct us to the evidence quoted”, or
  • “As the report is yet to be published, it is not possible to evaluate the accuracy of these claims”, or
  • “When pushed, X could not provide any documentation to back up her claims”.

Thoughts?

July 30 2011

04:57

A portrait: David Minthorn, grammar expert for the Associated Press

Washington Post :: In its modern, digital forms, writing has become something like an untended garden. It’s overgrown with text-speak and crawling with invasive species like tweets and dashed-off e-mails. OMG, it’s a mess. So think of David Minthorn as a linguistic gardener, doggedly cultivating this weedy patch in the hope of restoring some order and maybe coaxing something beautiful out of it. Minthorn’s mission is the maintenance of English grammar, the policing of punctuation and the enforcement of a consistent written style.

A portrait - Continue to read Paul Farhi, www.washingtonpost.com

July 25 2011

17:34

The style challenge

Odd one out - image by Cliff Muller
Spot the odd one out. Image by Cliff Muller

Time was when a journalist could learn one or two writing styles and stick with them. They might command enormous respect for being the best at what they did. But sometimes, when that journalist moved to another employer, their style became incongruous. And they couldn’t change.

This is the style challenge, and it’s one that has become increasingly demanding for journalists in an online age.

Because not only must they be able to adapt their style for different types of reporting; not only must they be able to adapt for different brands; not only must they be able to adapt their style within different brands across multiple media; but they must also be able to adapt their style within a single medium, across multiple platforms: Twitter, Facebook, blogs, Flickr, YouTube, or anywhere else that their audiences gather.

Immersion and language

Style is a fundamental skill in journalism. It is difficult to teach, because it relies on an individual immersing themselves in media, and doing so in a way that goes beyond each message to the medium itself. This is why journalism tutors urge their students so strongly to read as many newspapers as they can; to watch the news and listen to it, obsessively. Without immersion it is difficult to speak any language.

Now, some people do immerse themselves and have a handle on current affairs. That’s useful, but not the point.

Some do it and gain an understanding of institutions and audiences (that one is left-leaning; this one is conservative with a small c, etc.).

This is also useful, but also not the point.

The point is about how each institution addresses each audience, and when.

Despite journalists and editors often having an intuitive understanding of this difference in print or broadcast, over the last decade they’ve often demonstrated an inability to apply the same principles when it comes to publishing online.

And so we’ve had shovelware: organisations republishing print articles online without any changes. We’ve had opinion columns published as blogs because ‘blogs are all about opinion’. And we’ve had journalists treating Twitter as just another newswire to throw out headlines.

This is like a person’s first attempt at a radio broadcast where they begin by addressing “Hey all you out there” as if they’re a Balearic DJ. Good journalists should know better.

Style serves communication

Among many other things a good journalism or media degree should teach not just the practical skills of journalism but an intellectual understanding of communication, and by extension, style.

Because style is, at its base, about communication. It is about register: understanding what tone to adopt based on who you are talking to, what you are talking about, the relationship you seek to engender, and the history behind that.

As communication channels and tools proliferate, we probably need to pay more attention to that.

Journalists are being asked to adapt their skills from print to video; from formal articles to informal blog posts; from Facebook Page updates to tweets.

They are having to learn new styles of liveblogging, audio slideshows, mapping and apps; to operate within the formal restrictions of XML or SEO.

For freelance journalists commissioning briefs increasingly ask for that flexibility even within the same piece of work, offering an extra payments for an online version, a structured version, a podcast, and so on.

These requests are often quite basic – requiring a list of links for an online version, for example – but as content management systems become more sophisticated, those conditions will become more stringent: supplying an XML file with data on a product being reviewed, for example, or a version optimised for search.

What complicates things further is that, for many of these platforms, we are inventing the language as we speak it.

For those new to the platform, it can be intimidating. But for those who invest time in gaining experience, it is an enormous opportunity.

Because those who master the style of a blog, or Facebook, or Twitter, or addressing a particular group on Flickr, or a YouTube community, put themselves in an incredible position, building networks that a small magazine publisher would die for.

That’s why style is so important – now more than ever, and in the future more than now.

17:34

The style challenge

Odd one out - image by Cliff Muller
Spot the odd one out. Image by Cliff Muller

Time was when a journalist could learn one or two writing styles and stick with them. They might command enormous respect for being the best at what they did. But sometimes, when that journalist moved to another employer, their style became incongruous. And they couldn’t change.

This is the style challenge, and it’s one that has become increasingly demanding for journalists in an online age.

Because not only must they be able to adapt their style for different types of reporting; not only must they be able to adapt for different brands; not only must they be able to adapt their style within different brands across multiple media; but they must also be able to adapt their style within a single medium, across multiple platforms: Twitter, Facebook, blogs, Flickr, YouTube, or anywhere else that their audiences gather.

Immersion and language

Style is a fundamental skill in journalism. It is difficult to teach, because it relies on an individual immersing themselves in media, and doing so in a way that goes beyond each message to the medium itself. This is why journalism tutors urge their students so strongly to read as many newspapers as they can; to watch the news and listen to it, obsessively. Without immersion it is difficult to speak any language.

Now, some people do immerse themselves and have a handle on current affairs. That’s useful, but not the point.

Some do it and gain an understanding of institutions and audiences (that one is left-leaning; this one is conservative with a small c, etc.).

This is also useful, but also not the point.

The point is about how each institution addresses each audience, and when.

Despite journalists and editors often having an intuitive understanding of this difference in print or broadcast, over the last decade they’ve often demonstrated an inability to apply the same principles when it comes to publishing online.

And so we’ve had shovelware: organisations republishing print articles online without any changes. We’ve had opinion columns published as blogs because ‘blogs are all about opinion’. And we’ve had journalists treating Twitter as just another newswire to throw out headlines.

This is like a person’s first attempt at a radio broadcast where they begin by addressing “Hey all you out there” as if they’re a Balearic DJ. Good journalists should know better.

Style serves communication

Among many other things a good journalism or media degree should teach not just the practical skills of journalism but an intellectual understanding of communication, and by extension, style.

Because style is, at its base, about communication. It is about register: understanding what tone to adopt based on who you are talking to, what you are talking about, the relationship you seek to engender, and the history behind that.

As communication channels and tools proliferate, we probably need to pay more attention to that.

Journalists are being asked to adapt their skills from print to video; from formal articles to informal blog posts; from Facebook Page updates to tweets.

They are having to learn new styles of liveblogging, audio slideshows, mapping and apps; to operate within the formal restrictions of XML or SEO.

For freelance journalists commissioning briefs increasingly ask for that flexibility even within the same piece of work, offering an extra payments for an online version, a structured version, a podcast, and so on.

These requests are often quite basic – requiring a list of links for an online version, for example – but as content management systems become more sophisticated, those conditions will become more stringent: supplying an XML file with data on a product being reviewed, for example, or a version optimised for search.

What complicates things further is that, for many of these platforms, we are inventing the language as we speak it.

For those new to the platform, it can be intimidating. But for those who invest time in gaining experience, it is an enormous opportunity.

Because those who master the style of a blog, or Facebook, or Twitter, or addressing a particular group on Flickr, or a YouTube community, put themselves in an incredible position, building networks that a small magazine publisher would die for.

That’s why style is so important – now more than ever, and in the future more than now.

08:07

The style challenge

Odd one out - image by Cliff Muller

Spot the odd one out. Image by Cliff Muller

Time was when a journalist could learn one or two writing styles and stick with them. They might command enormous respect for being the best at what they did. But sometimes, when that journalist moved to another employer, their style became incongruous. And they couldn’t change.

This is the style challenge, and it’s one that has become increasingly demanding for journalists in an online age.

Because not only must they be able to adapt their style for different types of reporting; not only must they be able to adapt for different brands; not only must they be able to adapt their style within different brands across multiple media; but they must also be able to adapt their style within a single medium, across multiple platforms: Twitter, Facebook, blogs, Flickr, YouTube, or anywhere else that their audiences gather.

Immersion and language

Style is a fundamental skill in journalism. It is difficult to teach, because it relies on an individual immersing themselves in media, and doing so in a way that goes beyond each message to the medium itself. This is why journalism tutors urge their students so strongly to read as many newspapers as they can; to watch the news and listen to it, obsessively. Without immersion it is difficult to speak any language.

Now, some people do immerse themselves and have a handle on current affairs. That’s useful, but not the point.

Some do it and gain an understanding of institutions and audiences (that one is left-leaning; this one is conservative with a small c, etc.).

This is also useful, but also not the point.

The point is about how each institution addresses each audience, and when.

Despite journalists and editors often having an intuitive understanding of this difference in print or broadcast, over the last decade they’ve often demonstrated an inability to apply the same principles when it comes to publishing online.

And so we’ve had shovelware: organisations republishing print articles online without any changes. We’ve had opinion columns published as blogs because ‘blogs are all about opinion’. And we’ve had journalists treating Twitter as just another newswire to throw out headlines.

This is like a person’s first attempt at a radio broadcast where they begin by addressing “Hey all you out there” as if they’re a Balearic DJ. Good journalists should know better.

Style serves communication

Among many other things a good journalism or media degree should teach not just the practical skills of journalism but an intellectual understanding of communication, and by extension, style.

Because style is, at its base, about communication. It is about register: understanding what tone to adopt based on who you are talking to, what you are talking about, the relationship you seek to engender, and the history behind that.

As communication channels and tools proliferate, we probably need to pay more attention to that.

Journalists are being asked to adapt their skills from print to video; from formal articles to informal blog posts; from Facebook Page updates to tweets.

They are having to learn new styles of liveblogging, audio slideshows, mapping and apps; to operate within the formal restrictions of XML or SEO.

For freelance journalists commissioning briefs increasingly ask for that flexibility even within the same piece of work, offering an extra payments for an online version, a structured version, a podcast, and so on.

These requests are often quite basic – requiring a list of links for an online version, for example – but as content management systems become more sophisticated, those conditions will become more stringent: supplying an XML file with data on a product being reviewed, for example, or a version optimised for search.

What complicates things further is that, for many of these platforms, we are inventing the language as we speak it.

For those new to the platform, it can be intimidating. But for those who invest time in gaining experience, it is an enormous opportunity.

Because those who master the style of a blog, or Facebook, or Twitter, or addressing a particular group on Flickr, or a YouTube community, put themselves in an incredible position, building networks that a small magazine publisher would die for.

That’s why style is so important – now more than ever, and in the future more than now.

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March 15 2011

17:30

A very important matter: Should ebook titles be in quotes or italics?

We’ve been writing quite a bit lately about ebooks and their potential as a distribution mechanism (and maybe even revenue driver) for journalism. Whether it’s Foreign Policy, The New York Times, ProPublica, or N+1, lots of news organizations are interested in the medium as a place for work that sits somewhere between a news article and a full blown traditional book.

But that opens up a question we’ve been debating here today and that I’m hoping you can help me answer. How, visually, do you refer to the titles of these ebooks that fall in between? Do they get italics or “quotation marks”?

(I know — I promised this was a very important matter.)

Here at the Lab, and like many of us were taught in high school English, we use italics for traditional books. It’s Here Comes Everybody, not “Here Comes Everybody.” And that holdover from print still seems reasonable to me. But does it apply in the same way to ebooks, which by their nature can be much more varied — including, when natively digital, often much shorter — than a cloth-and-spine acid-free hardcover?

Argument for italics: Did you see the word “book,” right there inside “ebook”? Books get italics! Most ebooks published are still digital versions of print books, and if it’s The Sun Also Rises on your shelf, wouldn’t it also be The Sun Also Rises on your Kindle?

Argument for quotation marks: “Ebook” is a flexible catch-all term for lots of different kinds of things. Sure, it can mean Hemingway, but it can also mean a few short pages of tales about Jennifer-Love-Hewitt-as-superhero (seriously, go buy that, three bucks, Kevin Fanning’s great), a single Robin Sloan short story, or a bunch of tweets strung together with a title.

Many traditional style guides say “A Short Story” goes in quotes, while A Real Book goes in itals. But what happens when you publish and sell that short story on its own, outside the confines of the larger book container? Similarly, when Sebastian Rotella writes a story for ProPublica’s website, it’s “Pakistan and the Mumbai Attacks: The Untold Story.” When it gets shifted to the Kindle, word-for-word, does it somehow become, Transformer-like, Pakistan and the Mumbai Attacks: The Untold Story? Heck, when you email a Word doc to Amazon to convert it to Kindle format, does it magically become Fred Davis’ Grocery List, March 2011 Edition?

What the experts (or “experts”) say

I note that Yahoo’s style guide comes down on the side of quotation marks — but it’s making a broader argument that isn’t specifically about ebooks. Even a print first edition of “The Sun Also Rises” is denied italics in Yahoo’s eyes.

In contrast, Wikipedia’s style manual says italics for all books. It doesn’t address ebooks directly, but notes that “[t]itles of shorter works should be enclosed in double quotation marks (“text like this”)” and says it “particularly applies to works that exist as a smaller part of a larger work.” (But the same work can now be a smaller part of a larger work and its own freestanding work per se.)

The AP Stylebook doesn’t use italics for anything — but that’s thanks to historic newspaper printing conventions, so it’s not of much relevance here.

The MLA and APA style guides apparently treat ebooks as regular books with italics. Same with Chicago, although all three are really thinking only of the most traditional, book-like ebooks.

The Atavist uses quotation marks for its Kindle-length nonfiction. But Amazon puts those same works in italics. (Except when it doesn’t. But it never uses quotes, far as I can see — it’s either italics or plain roman.) Wired, of all outlets, goes italics.

Or to look at the world of music, which has a similar whole-vs.-part problem: Albums get italics (The Dismemberment Plan’s Emergency & I), songs get quotes (The Dismemberment Plan’s “Memory Machine”). So are these new ebooks more like EPs, which get italics, or more like a 7″ single, which would generally get quotes despite having multiple songs on it?

Or as Megan (a known italics supporter) just suggested, will the usefulness of both go away as the continued hypertexting of everything means you can just link to Emergency & I for anyone who really wants to know more about it, reducing the need for a visual cue for what-this-is?

Italics, “quotes,” “both,” or neither?

My impulse is in the direction of quotation marks. I long ago decided that news outlets would not get silly italics (it’s The New York Times here, not The New York Times), because the italics are all about the physical artifact of a newspaper, not the news organization that backs it — and the Internet era has made it abundantly clear the creating entity is the organization, not the dead tree. I feel similarly about ebooks, that they’re part of a general dragging of books away from being A Separate Holy Thing and toward a world where content of all shapes and sizes sits together on common platforms, whether that’s your web browser, your Kindle, or your iPad.

But does that mean that print books need to be dragged over to quotation marks with their electronic cousins? Or is it okay if it’s The Sun Also Rises in one format and “The Sun Also Rises” in another? Should some ebooks get quotes and others get italics? Is the container, the form, no longer the defining quality — is it a case-by-case question now?

I bring this up not because the world will care one bit which we use, but because it’s a broader sign of the disruptive power of new digital forms. Our rules about titles are largely rules about packages and forms: What kind of a box does something fit into? Books get x, articles get y, films get z. But those containers aren’t as neat as they used to be, and they don’t always tell us the same things about their contents as they used to. So it’s only natural that the way we talk about them — and the way we think about them — will evolve alongside them.

So what do you think? Italics, quotes, or some variant thereof?

February 05 2011

13:22

Four levels of storytelling…

Thanks to teachj for this link to the four levels of storytelling.

Most high school journalists are on level one, with a few managing to get to level two.

Most broadcast journalists are on level three, with some still struggling at level two.

Level four is for the masters…the names you remember. Charles Kuralt is probably the best known of these. Steve Hartman is another. They weave their magic with words…with interviews…nats…visuals.

Level four is the golden standard we should all strive for.


September 21 2010

12:47

How to create a wordpress magazine theme using Twenty Ten – Part 1

This is part one of a short series outlining how to tweak a wordpress template to get some magazine style functionality.

I’m in the process of updating installations of wordpress for our students to use. In one sense it’s a stop gap measure as we are in the process of commissioning a more “industrial strength” system for them. But even with a new system in place I think we will still leave some courses the option of going the wordpress route. The magazine students for example, love the flexibility (and low level of tech) that design templates offer. It doesn’t seem to have done them any harm in terms of nominations.

When it comes to design, finding a wordpress template you like is half the battle, there are thousands out there. As more people use wordpress to get publications online, magazine style templates have become a popular search and a big growth area for premium template developers.

It’s tempting to pay for a template you like – nothing wrong with that. But it’s not as complicated as you think to get something up and running, out of the box, with very little tinkering. Especially if you build on existing templates. So I thought it would be useful to look at how easy it would be modify the standard Twentyten theme in to something with some magazine functionality.

Hacking around like this is how I learnt a lot of stuff about wordpress and it’s also a way to get your feet wet with a programming language. In this case PHP

To play along with this you’ll need:

  • Your own installation of the latest version of the wordpress.org software (as I write this it’s 3.0.1). Sorry wordpress.com won’t do.If you have webspace and your thinking of adding wordpress you could do worse than check out the wordpress codex entry on installing wordpress. Some hosts will offer automated installation of wordpress – very useful.
  • A text editor. Even word will do.

That’s it.

The design

The adapted Twenty Ten Theme

This is a screenshot of what we are going to end up with. It has a front page that has a featured post at the top and sections underneath for each category. You’ll also notice that I’ve tinkered around with the header to remove the big image. OK, it’s not going to win any design awards but this is more about exploring the concepts.

Normally you’d plan this kind of thing on paper first. You’d also work on the code in a development environment. An installation of WordPress that only runs on your machine, not the web.

If you’re feeling really brave you can set one up. Here are few resources

I’m going to assume that we dive straight in and edit the template live! I know, bad, bad, bad. All I’m going to say is do so at your own risk.

A word on programming and PHP

WordPress is written in a programming language called PHP.  This isn’t a programming tutorial (I’m not going to explain the basics of programming), but there are a couple of important things to know.

Spotting PHP

You may already be familiar with HTML. You can spot it in the raw code for a webpage because it is contained in pointy – brackets.

[html]

Anything here will appear as a heading two

[/html]

In a similar way, you can spot PHP in the raw code for a webpage because it is always between  <?php …. ?>. Here’s an example:

[php]

[/php]

But if you look at the source for this webpage in your browser you will only see HTML. Why don’t we see the PHP?

PHP is a server side language. That means the webserver looks at the page and processes any PHP it finds before it sends you the page. When we use PHP as part of wordpress themes we are using it to generate HTML.

Functions

When programmers write code they will always look for ways to avoid repetitive jobs. Rather than write the same code every time, they write a function. This is a set of instructions that can be called when needed.  The example of PHP above is a function:

[php]

[/php]

Whenever we want to show the title of post we call the function the_title() and the server runs the code needed to get all the right information. The semi-colon is also important. Here’s another example:

[php]

[/php]

This time it’s a function to show a thumbnail for a post. But there is also some content in the brackets. This is a parameter or extra information that the function might need. When the server runs the function to get the post thumbnail it tells the function it wants the thumbnail sized thumbnail. I know, sounds like repetition. We could also say:

[php]

[/php]

That says ‘get the thumbnail but make it medium sized’. In case you were interested, the thumbnail and medium sizes are defined in the media settings of your blog. But more on that later.

There are hundreds of these functions in wordpress. Some are specific to templates, like the examples above, but others do the heavy lifting of making the blog work. We’ll be scratching the surface of the template functions here but I thought it was worth a little intro.

So we are going to be looking at a little PHP to call some functions to help us modify the TwentyTen template. Hopefully, now, that might statement might make a bit more sense.

How wordpress themes work.

You can get a really good overview of the way themes work from the wordpress codex and plenty of other websites around. A google search for wordpress theme tutorials should give you plenty of options. But let’s break it down in to a few simple ideas.

A wordpress theme is split in to parts:

  • the content you want in a structured form
  • instructions on the way you want it to look.

This information is held in a number of different files.  These are stored in a folder, one for each theme, in the WP_content/themes folder of your wordpress installation. The more complex the theme, the more files there tend to be.

In a basic theme, for example, you will have a file called single.php. That’s the content and structure part. This is a mixture of HTML and PHP. But the way it looks, the colour and style of text, position on the page etc is controlled by a file called style.css. This is a cascading style sheet file.

The Twentyten theme we are going to edit, has 18 content and structure files and four style sheet files. We wont be using all of these for this tutorial. We are only interested in two.

  • Main Index Template (index.php)
  • Stylesheet (style.css)

Accessing template files

There are several ways we can get at these files:

Any of those will do. But I’m going to work through on the assumption you are using the built in editor.

First thing to do is check you have the TwentyTen theme activated by going to Appearance >Themes. It should show Twenty Ten as the current theme. Then click through to the editor panel (Appearance > Editor).

The Theme editor

You’ll see a list of the 18 template files down the right-hand side and an editor window. By default this displays the Visual Editor Stylesheet (editor-style.css). All  you need to do is find and click Main Index Template or Stylesheet on the right to load up the files we will be working with.

Permission to edit.

When you look at the bottom of the editor window you may see a warning: – You need to make this file writeable before you can save your changes

You need to set the permissions on the theme folder!

This could be the biggest stumbling block of the process. But if you are serious about having a go at theme development, even tweaking like this, it’s worth getting your head round.

To remove the error message you need to set the permissions for the Twenty Ten folder to be 666.

Does that make no sense? You could try:

If you set the permissions correctly, the message should be replaced by a big Update File button.

You're ready to start editing!

Some final preparation

From this point I’m going to assume that you have a working installation of wordpress up and running. But before we experiment with the theme we need to have some content to work with. So if your blog doesn’t have posts yet you need to add a few posts to work with. You could do this manually using the lipsum.com, a lorem-ipsum generator and some liberal cut and paste for content. There are also a number of random content generator plugins available. For this exercise I used demo data creator.

We will also need to create some categories and assign the posts across the categories. I’ve used the following for this demo:

  • News
  • Sport
  • Featured Story

Once you have done that we are ready for Part 2 tomorrow, where we will start to edit the front page to get that magazine look.

As always, feedback and suggestions always welcome

June 03 2010

07:53

AP updates Stylebook with social media guidelines

The Associated Press (AP) has updated its Stylebook to include 42 new entries under a special social media section. The new edition of the style guide, which is widely used in the US and internationally, has changed its recommendation for “web site” to “website” and now includes terms such as “app”,” blogs”, “click-throughs”, “friend” and “unfriend”, “metadata”, “RSS”, “search engine optimisation”, “smart phone”, trending, widget and wiki. (Not all necessarily in keeping with the Journalism.co.uk house style…)

The new Stylebook also includes advice for journalists using social media for their work, in particular tips on how to use Twitter and Facebook effectively.

Full release at this link…

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March 22 2010

02:38

Christmas Dollar Store Style E-book.

How To Decorate, Entertain And Create Beautiful Christmas Gifts Using Only Ordinary Items From Any Dollar Store. Create Christmas Gifts With Class – For A Lot Less Cash.
Christmas Dollar Store Style E-book.

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March 14 2010

08:42

New Style Entertainment Centers for New Style Tv?s

Last year we had a new dilemma. Our old television died and we had to get a new one. In a sense, with the digital conversion takes place this year was very good. But a new TV is not the dilemma was the dilemma, a new entertainment center. In the past, a new TV is that you need to change the large pieces of furniture in your house, but with the new style of flat television, this time it was necessary.

Well, I love our new TV and make all men in the house, they have to wear. Our old 27 “TV have weighed about 200 kg., Our new and larger TV weighs less than 50 kg, the change in such a way is good. But television is not in our entertainment center, so look for a new and research for the perfect room for our family was our work.

When it comes to entertainment centers, people have different needs. The most important condition of my old recreation center has been able to completely close one, as the television. But then we lived in our old house and we only had a living room. With a separate family room now, it was not an important feature. The main feature I was interested at that time was a space saved. Our entertainment center years has been close to him very deeply television and the space was very floor. We absolutely must not stand more, so I was happy for the extra room. The family room is narrow, so I wanted to keep something on the TV and additional components.

Shopping, entertainment center was fun and the variety was greater than I expected. The new style of TV produced a new type of entertainment center, and old styles are also available. The main styles available include:

For our purposes were the two best style entertainment centers, furniture and basic TV TV Lift Cabinet. Part of the furniture LIFT was very nice, they were like fine furniture, and have been offered in many styles. When television was in the living room, I would in any case such a solution. But they have opted for a basic pine furniture tv. It’s the perfect size, not to take too much space, and so on shelves for components. It is also about half the width of our existing entertainment center, so that the space seems larger. Yes, we are very pleased with our new entertainment center and TV, plus, it’s beautiful, so do not worry decoder digital conversion!

MJ wrote for ClickShops Inc., which offers a wide selection of entertainment centers at www. entertainment centers. us. com.

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