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November 30 2010

17:00

Team of volunteer journalists wants to train locals in conflict zones to tell their own stories, improve their lives

What if online video could prevent genocide? That’s what three USC Annenberg School graduate students wondered when they hopped a flight to Rwanda a few years ago, Flip cameras in their carry-ons.

“The idea was, in a time where YouTube exists, it’s immoral for genocide to exist in human history,” Jon Vidar told me recently. The group wanted to give survivors tools to tell their own stories. “Honestly, we were pretty idealistic going in.” Since that first visit to Rwanda, Vidar, a freelance photojournalist, and his journalist friends have taken the concept to neighboring countries and then, earlier this year, to Iraq. Their ad hoc trips have morphed into a nonprofit, kept going by volunteers, called The Tiziano Project, named for an Italian journalist who liked to go where he shouldn’t. Their mission is straightforward: Train locals in conflict zones and post-conflict zones in the craft of journalism, particularly new media, and give them the tools they need to tell their own stories.

“We’re trying to train locals to be journalists,” Vidar said.

The group’s most recent project, Tiziano360, trained 12 locals in Iraq in new media, producing a website that “documents the life, culture, and news in present day Iraqi Kurdistan.” Vidar worked in the Kurdish region of Turkey for four years doing archaeological research, a motive for the region selection. Logistically, it was easier to work on the Iraq side of the border, Vidar said.

The site has a slick design and the content is high quality. It recently won an award from the New Media Institute for multimedia storytelling. But Tiziano also has a practical aim. “A direct goal of the project is job creation,” Vidar said. “We don’t care where people get jobs, as long as they are using the skills in new media storytelling.”

Four of the participants credit the project with new job offers. Other trainees from past projects now string for Western outlets.

“The best thing in this project was the practical aspect of it,” Shivan Soto, who participated in the Iraq project, wrote in an email. “[It] was a very good and new experience for me.”

Since picking up new skills, Soto has been offered a variety of gigs from news organizations and NGOs. And another participant, Sahar Alani, took a job with a large corporation in the region working in new media.

For now, Tiziano is funded project-by-project. For the 360 experiment, they submitted a pitch to a Facebook contest backed by the JP Morgan Chase Community Giving program. They won $25,000, Andrew McGregor, a Tiziano founder, told me.

“During the competition, we really motivated the Kurdish community [on Facebook],” Vidar told me. “We had 600 Kurdish friends, friends in the government. We had friends in NGOs.”

Next up for Tiziano is a project that will start by working with students in Los Angeles and move on to the Congo. The trainer himself is a genocide survivor.

October 18 2010

17:14

NPR: What's the Point of Journalism School, Anyway?

NPR has an interesting piece on why students spend thousands of dollars to get a degree that prepares them for what many believe is dying profession.

Several people in the report question the conventional wisdom that journalism is on the skids.

"It's a renaissance, a re-creation," says Geneva Overholser, director of journalism at the USC Annenberg School, where NPR based its story. "I don't

July 27 2010

02:20

USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism for Prospective Students

USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism for Prospective Students The undergraduate degrees at USC Annenberg provide a strong foundation for people interested in working in the communication industries: the media, public relations, advertising, strategic corporate and organizational communication, political consulting, higher education, and many more. USC Annenberg offers three undergraduate degrees: * Communication: One of the most versatile degrees offered at USC, a bachelor’s degree in communication prepares you for professional employment or graduate work. * Journalism: With options in Print & Digital Journalism and Broadcast & Digital Journalism, undergraduate students focus on writing, ethics and the use of new technology in a rapidly changing industry. * Public Relations: Emphasizes communication problem solving, strategic thinking, applied skills and management, rather than communication theory; alumni work in all types of organizations. For more information for prospective students: annenberg.usc.edu

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