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March 19 2012

03:05

Mobile, tablet devices increase news consumption

New research shows that mobile and tablet devices are increasing American’s news consumption, according to the 2012 State of the News Media report by Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. More than a quarter of Americans (27%) now get news on mobile devices, and for the...

03:01

How Facebook, Twitter differ for news consumption

People who get news from Facebook are most likely to get it from friends and family, rather than directly from a news organization they follow, according to the 2012 State of the News Media report released today by Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. For Twitter users,...

September 13 2011

20:15

Mobile Web use to surpass PC by 2015

By 2015, more U.S. Internet users will access the Internet through mobile devices than through PCs or other wired devices, according to a new report from International Data Corporation (IDC). ”Forget what we have taken for granted on how consumers use the Internet,” said Karsten Weide,...

May 20 2011

13:51

Did you know that LinkedIn can be a huge traffic source?

Most media sites are obsessively focused on how to get more traffic from Facebook and Twitter, but few pay attention to LinkedIn. Big mistake. It is one of the fastest growing social networking sites with deep user loyalty and engagement, and is quickly becoming a big potential traffic source, especially to news and information sites.

On B2B sites, in fact, LinkedIn refers more traffic than Facebook and Twitter combined, according to a 2010 study by LeadForce.

Since LinkedIn launched its LinkedIn Today news section, sites have seen a big uptick in traffic from LinkedIn. The chart below from Silicon Alley Insider shows how dramatic the growth has been recently.

chart of the day, referrals by linkedin, may 2011

I’m increasingly meeting people who now visit LinkedIn on a daily basis and who find new features like LinkedIn Today incredibly valuable.

 

July 28 2010

16:14

New report: Internet more important than newspapers, but still not trustworth

Newspapers are now less important than the Internet as a source of information, yet the majority of online users say most online information is not reliable, according to the 10th annual study of the impact of the Internet on Americans by the Center for the Digital Future.

The study also found that 70 percent of online users believe that Internet advertising is “annoying,” yet 55 percent of users said they would rather see Web advertising than pay for content.

Among the study’s findings:

  • Americans on the Internet — For the first time, the Internet is used by more than 80 percent of Americans — now 82 percent.   Weekly hours online — The average time online has now reached 19 hours per week.  Although more than two-thirds of Americans have gone online for a decade, the largest year-to-year increases in weekly online use have been reported in the two most recent Digital Future studies.
  • Gaps in Internet use in age groups — Not surprisingly, Internet use continues to increase as age decreases, with 100 percent of those under age 24 going online.  However, a surprisingly high percentage of Americans between 36 and 55 are not Internet users: among respondents age 46 to 55, 19 percent are non-users; among those 36 to 45, 15 percent are non-users.
  • Low adoption of new media — Although new media is used by large percentages of  Internet users age 24 and under, overall large percentages of Internet users never go online to do instant messaging (50 percent), work on a blog (79 percent), participate in chat rooms (80 percent), or make or receive phone calls (85 percent).
  • Does technology make the world a better place — The percentage of users age 16 and older who said that communication technology makes the world a better place has declined to 56 percent of users from its peak of 66 percent in 2002.
  • Internet and Political Campaigns — although more than 70 percent of users agree that the Internet is important for political campaigns, only 27 percent of users said that by using the Internet public officials will care more about what people think, and 29 percent said that the Internet can give people more of a say in what government does.
  • Buying online — 65 percent of adult Internet users buy online (the same as in 2008), and make an average of 35.2 purchases per year (up from 34.1 per year in 2008).
  • Internet impact on traditional retail declines — 61 percent of Internet users said that online purchasing has reduced their buying in traditional retail stores — down from 69 percent in 2008.
  • Top 10 online purchases — 59 percent of Internet users said they purchase books or clothes online, followed by gifts (55 percent), travel (53 percent), electronics/appliances (47 percent), videos (46 percent), computers or peripherals (41 percent), software or games (40 percent), CDs (40 percent), and products for hobbies (38 percent).
  • The study found that as sources of information – their primary function – newspapers rank below the Internet or television.  Only 56 percent of Internet users ranked newspapers as important or very important sources of information for them – a decrease from 60 percent in 2008 and below the Internet (78 percent), and television (68 percent).
  • Even lower are the percentages of users who consider newspapers important as sources of entertainment for them, now considered important by 29 percent of Internet users, and down from 32 percent in 2008 – also last among principal media.
  • Eighteen percent of Internet users said they stopped a subscription to a newspaper or magazine because they now get the same or related content online – down slightly from 22 percent in 2008, but nevertheless a strong indication that print newspapers can be sacrificed by a significant percentage of Internet users.
  • Internet users were asked where they would go for information provided by their newspaper if the print edition ceased, 59 percent said they would read the online edition of the publication; only 37 percent said they would instead read the print edition of another newspaper.
  • Twenty-two percent of users who read newspapers said they would not miss the print edition of their newspaper.
  • Sixty-one percent of users said that only half or less of online information is reliable — a new low level for the Digital Future Project.
  • Even more disturbing is that 14 percent of Internet users said that only a small portion or none of the information online is reliable – a percentage that has grown for the past three years and is now at the highest level thus far in the Digital Future Project.
  • Also revealing is the percentage of users who have limited trust even in the Web sites they visit regularly: although 78 percent said that most or all of the information on the sites they visit regularly is reliable (a decline from the previous two years), 22 percent of users say that only one half or less of information on sites they visit regularly is reliable.
  • Even search engines such as Google and Yahoo – traditional stalwarts of online credibility – have lost some of their luster.   While 53 percent of Internet users said that most or all of the information provided by search engines is reliable and accurate, that percentage declined slightly in the current Digital Future Study and is well below the peak of 64 percent in 2006.
  • 36 percent of users said only about half of information provided by search engines is reliable and accurate, and 12 percent said only a small portion or none of it was reliable.
  • Only 46 percent of users said they have some trust or a lot of trust in the Internet in general.  Nine percent of users have no trust in the Internet.

May 24 2010

02:54

Twitter relies less on traditional media than blogs

the stories and issues that gain traction in social media differ substantially from those that lead in the mainstream press, according to a detailed analysis of social media by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. The study also found that the links shared in Twitter are much less likely to be to traditional media outlets than the links in blogs.

Among the findings:

  • Social media and the mainstream press clearly embrace different agendas. Blogs shared the same lead story with traditional media in just 13 of the 49 weeks studied. Twitter was even less likely to share the traditional media agenda — the lead story matched that of the mainstream press in just four weeks of the 29 weeks studied. On YouTube, the top stories overlapped with traditional media eight out of 49 weeks.
  • The stories that gain traction in social media do so quickly, often within hours of initial reports, and leave quickly as well. Just 5% of the top five stories on Twitter remained among the top stories the following week. This was true of 13% of the top stories on blogs and 9% on YouTube. In the mainstream press, on the other hand, fully 50% of the top five stories one week remained a top story a week later.
  • Politics, so much a focus of cable and radio talk programming, has found a place in blogs and on YouTube. On blogs, 17% of the top five linked-to stories in a given week were about U.S. government or politics, often accompanied by emphatic personal analysis or evaluations. These topics were even more prevalent among news videos on YouTube, where they accounted for 21% of all top stories. On Twitter, however, technology stories were linked to far more than anything else, accounting for 43% of the top five stories in a given week and 41% of the lead items. By contrast, technology filled 1% of the newshole in the mainstream press during the same period.
  • While social media players espouse a different agenda than the mainstream media, blogs still heavily rely on the traditional press — and primarily just a few outlets within that — for their information. More than 99% of the stories linked to in blogs came from legacy outlets such as newspapers and broadcast networks. And just four — the BBC, CNN, the New York Times and the Washington Post accounted for fully 80% of all links.
  • Twitter, by contrast, was less tied to traditional media. Here half (50%) of the links were to legacy outlets; 40% went to web-only news sources such as Mashable and CNET. The remaining 10% went to wire stories or non-news sources on the Web such as a blog known as “Green Briefs,” which summarized daily developments during the June protests in Iran.
  • The most popular news videos on YouTube, meanwhile, stood out for having a broader international mix. A quarter (26%) of the top watched news videos were of non-U.S. events, primarily those with a strong visual appeal such as raw footage of Pope Benedict XVI getting knocked over during Mass on Christmas Eve or a clip of a veteran Brazilian news anchor getting caught insulting some janitors without realizing his microphone was still live. Celebrity and media-focused videos were also given significant prominence.


May 06 2010

11:38

Who is using Twitter, and how

Interesting data  about the growth of Twitter and social media in this recent study from Edison Research and Arbitron.

Highlights of the study include:

Awareness of Twitter has exploded from 5% of Americans 12+ in 2008 to 87% in 2010 (by comparison, Facebook’s awareness is 88%)

Despite equal awareness, Twitter trails Facebook significantly in usage: 7% of Americans (17 million persons) actively use Twitter, while 41% maintain a profile page on Facebook.

Nearly two-thirds of active Twitter users access social networking sites using a mobile phone

51% of active Twitter users follow companies, brands or products on social networks

Twitter Usage in America 2010 from Tom Webster on Vimeo.

For the complete report, including a downloadable PDF of the slides and executive summary, click here: Twitter Usage in America: 2010 – Complete Report


May 01 2010

23:50

One in eight to cancel cable and satellite TV in 2010

Watch out: We’re starting to see the beginnings of a trend of people getting rid of their cable and satellite TV subscriptions in favor of Internet streaming. One in eight consumers will eliminate or scale back their cable, satellite or other pay-TV service this year, according to a new study released this week by Yankee Group.

Interesting, the biggest reason why customers will cut the cord, according to the study, is the growing cost of pay-TV service — which is increasing on average 5% a year.

March 31 2010

11:26

The people who want to buy iPads are…

Market research company The NPD Group has released a new report, Apple iPad: Consumers’ Perceptions and Attitudes, that found the consumers most interested in buying an iPad are 18-34 year olds (78 percent) with $100,000 or greater income (80 percent).

More from the report:

Those demographic groups are the ones with the most interest in buying an iPad. Only 18 percent of all consumers surveyed expressed a real interest in owning an iPad while 27 percent of 18-34 year olds and 24 percent of Apple owners said they were extremely or very interested.

One of the main reasons Apple owners are interested in the iPad is because it’s an Apple product.  Thirty-seven percent cited “liking the Apple brand” as a top reason for their interest in the iPad.  That tied with “multi-touch screen”, which was also the number one reason driving interest among 18-34 year olds.  The 18-34 year old consumer is also the most likely to play music and access the internet on the iPad.

“The most interested potential iPad customers see it primarily as a music device, or for its internet access capabilities,” said Stephen Baker, vice president of industry analysis at NPD.  “Considering what people are planning to use the iPad for, it’s not hard to understand why people who have these capabilities on other devices, such as the iPod Touch or a notebook/netbook, may not want to spend $500 or more on a similar device.  This points to the need for Apple to close the content deals that focus the iPad on what is likely to be its best long-range value proposition around high quality media consumption.”

March 24 2010

16:04

iPad study: Likely use mimics desktops and laptops, not mobile

comScore: “Nearly half indicated a high likelihood of using the iPad for browsing the Internet 50 percent and email 48 percent, while more than one third said they would use it for listening to music 38 percent, reading books 37 percent, maintaining an address book/contact list 37 percent, watching videos/movies 36 percent, storing and viewing photos 35 percent and reading newspapers and magazines 34 percent.”


March 23 2010

02:25

60% of Americans Use TV and Internet Together

Nielsen reports that in the last quarter of 2009, simultaneous use of the Internet while watching TV reached three and a half hours a month, up 35% from the previous quarter. Nearly 60% of TV viewers now use the Internet once a month while also watching TV.

More tidbits:

  • Online video consumption is up 16% from last year. Of note, approximately 44% of all online video is being viewed in the workplace.  The research shows that Americans watch network programs online when they miss an episode or when a TV is not available.  Online video is used essentially like DVR and not typically a replacement for watching TV.
  • Active mobile video users grew by 57% from the fourth quarter of 2008 to the fourth quarter of 2009, from 11.2 million to 17.6 million.  Much of this increase can be linked to the strong growth of smartphones in the marketplace.


March 22 2010

00:57

Facebook Users Prefer Broadcast Media

Facebook now sends more traffic to media sites than Google News. Perhaps even more interestingly, Hitwise finds that a larger proportion of Facebook’s News and Media traffic is directed toward Broadcast Media websites compared with Google News, while print media brands dominate the sites that get visited after Google News.

March 17 2010

00:49

Americans are becoming news “grazers”

The American news consumer is increasingly becoming a grazer, across both online and offline platforms, according to new research from PEJ and the Pew Internet and American Life Project. “On a typical day, nearly half of Americans now get news from four to six different platforms—from online to TV to print and more.”

Within the online universe the same pattern holds true. People graze across multiple websites for their news. Only 21% say they tend to rely primarily on one destination; only a third even say they have a favorite news website (35%) among those they use. But these online news grazers do not range far. Most (57%) usually rely on two to five websites.


March 14 2010

00:33

News is a social experience

The latest Pew Internet & American Life Project report, “Understanding the Participatory News Consumer,”  examines how Americans are increasingly using their social networks and social networking technology to filter, assess, and react to news.

News consumption is a socially-engaging and socially-driven activity,
especially online. The public is clearly part of the news process now.
Participation comes more through sharing than through contributing news
themselves.
Getting news is often an important social act. Some 72% of American news consumers
say they follow the news because they enjoy talking with others about what is
happening in the world and 69% say keeping up with the news is a social or civic
obligation. And 50% of American news consumers say they rely to some degree on
people around them to tell them the news they need to know. Online, the social
experience is widespread:
! 75% of online news consumers say they get news forwarded through email or posts
on social networking sites and 52% say they share links to news with others via those
means.
! 51% of social networking site (e.g. Facebook) users who are also online news
consumers say that on a typical day they get news items from people they follow.
Another 23% of this cohort follow news organizations or individual journalists on
Pew Internet & American Life Project Understanding the Participatory News Consumer | 6
! 75% of online news consumers say they get news forwarded through email or posts
on social networking sites and 52% say they share links to news with others via those
means.
! 51% of social networking site (e.g. Facebook) users who are also online news
consumers say that on a typical day they get news items from people they follow.
Another 23% of this cohort follow news organizations or individual journalists on
social networking sites.
Some 37% of internet users have contributed to the creation of news, commentary about
it, or dissemination of news via social media. They have done at least one of the
following: commenting on a news story (25%); posting a link on a social networking site
(17%); tagging content (11%), creating their own original news material or opinion piece
(9%), or Tweeting about news (3%).

The report says:

“News consumption is a socially-engaging and socially-driven activity, especially online. The public is clearly part of the news process now. Participation comes more through sharing than through contributing news themselves.

“Getting news is often an important social act. Some 72% of American news consumers say they follow the news because they enjoy talking with others about what is happening in the world and 69% say keeping up with the news is a social or civic obligation. And 50% of American news consumers say they rely to some degree on people around them to tell them the news they need to know. Online, the social experience is widespread:

  • 75% of online news consumers say they get news forwarded through email or posts on social networking sites and 52% say they share links to news with others via those means.
  • 51% of social networking site (e.g. Facebook) users who are also online news consumers say that on a typical day they get news items from people they follow.
  • Another 23% of this cohort follow news organizations or individual journalists on on social networking sites and 52% say they share links to news with others via those means.
  • 51% of social networking site (e.g. Facebook) users who are also online news consumers say that on a typical day they get news items from people they follow.
  • Another 23% of this cohort follow news organizations or individual journalists on social networking sites.
  • Some 37% of internet users have contributed to the creation of news, commentary about it, or dissemination of news via social media. They have done at least one of the following: commenting on a news story (25%); posting a link on a social networking site (17%); tagging content (11%), creating their own original news material or opinion piece (9%), or Tweeting about news (3%).

  • February 25 2010

    01:57

    1 in 7 used both TV and Web during Super Bowl, Olympics

    One in seven people who watched the Super Bowl and the Olympics opening ceremony surfed the Web at the same time, according to Nielsen.

    “The Internet is our friend, not our enemy,” Leslie Moonves, chief executive of CBS Corporation, told The New York Times. “People want to be attached to each other.”


    February 05 2010

    16:09

    Facebook overtakes Google News as media site traffic driver

    Facebook was the #4 source of visits to News and Media sites last week, after Google, Yahoo! and msn, according to Hitwise. Google News accounted for 1.39% of visits to News and Media websites, and Facebook accounted for 3.52%. That’s a big shift since last April, when they were about equal.
    Facebook versus Google News


    January 14 2010

    15:30

    Web viewers are watching longer clips

    Web video viewers are watching longer clips on average; time spent (per viewer watching online video) jumped 13.2 percent to 193.2 minutes in December. According to the latest report issued by Nielsen Online, 137.4 million Americans watched Web video in December, a healthy increase of 10.3 percent versus the same month in 2008. Those viewers streamed over 10.7 billion videos during the month, representing an increase of 11.8 percent versus the same time period a year earlier.

    January 11 2010

    03:49

    Local news reports are repetitive

    A new study by the Project for Excellence in Journalism, an arm of the Pew Research Center finds that 83 percent of the reports in local news media “were essentially repetitive, conveying no new information.” The study looked at six major story lines that developed over one week last July in Baltimore.

    December 10 2009

    08:50

    Study reveals high interest In live, local mobile video

    According to a new Magid Media Labs study commissioned by the Open Mobile Video Coalition (OMVC), mobile consumers in the U.S. respond enthusiastically to the notion of watching live, local mobile DTV.

    When asked what live video they want to see, nearly nine out of ten survey respondents say they are interested in watching live news and weather programming while on the go.

    The national survey of 1,000 adults reveals that local news and information content will drive live mobile DTV, as 88% of respondents expressed interest in watching this content on mobile devices including laptops, netbooks, cellular handsets, and smartphones.

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